The Armory Art Show II

Lead: In 1913 a group of artistic innovators, rebels in another formulation, brought to the 69th Regiment Armory in New York a transformation of American art.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: They were known as the The Eight. Realistic painters, former newspaper artists from Philadelphia, yet they were strongly influenced by and drawn to the revolutionary transformation of European art particularly by the Impressionists. Their work demonstrated that while most American artists drew their inspiration from the salon style of universities and art academies, this approach was not universal.

 


The Armory Art Show I

Lead: In February and March 1913 an art exhibition in the 69th Regiment Armory in New York exploded what many considered to be the complacency of American Art. It was the Armory show.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: American art in the 19th century was quite traditional, a form of realism that was almost descriptive, often termed narrative art. Images were recognizable, designed to inspire, not necessarily to challenge the viewer. The typical American artist produced works, whether in portraiture or landscape, that were recognizable and comfortable, especially to the uninitiated.

 


Michelangelo I

Lead: In 1508 Pope Julian II commissioned one of the most ambitious projects in the history of art - the painting of the unadorned ceiling of the Sistine Chapel.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Michelangelo Buonarroti was born in Caprese, Italy, in 1475. He spent his formative years in Renaissance Florence, one of Italy’s premier centers of artistic learning. At age 13 Michelangelo was apprenticed to a prominent painter and learned the skills of the fresco, the application of paint to a freshly plastered wall. Within two years he had shown such skill that he attracted the interest of a wealthy and powerful patron, Lorenzo de Medici, he of the most prominent banking family in Florence. Michelangelo was invited to study classical sculpture in the de Medici Palace, where he also met leading artists, philosophers and poets and had access to the family’s extensive ancient art collection. By age 16, Michelangelo had produced two marble relief sculptures and was fast on the way to establishing a reputation as a brilliant and creative artist. This was confirmed by his early works, such as the Pieta in St. Peter’s Cathedral in Rome and the powerful but somehow delicate David, his most famous sculpture, which was commissioned by the city of Florence.

 

Read more →

Michelangelo Part II

Lead: Between 1508 and 1512 Michelangelo Buonarrati painted the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel – one of the greatest accomplishments in the history of art.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: The Sistine Chapel, built in 1473 in the Vatican Palace, was named for Pope Sixtus IV. In 1508 his successor Julius II commissioned 33-year-old Michelangelo to paint the unadorned ceiling of the chapel, but the artist abandoned the original plan, which was to surround the twelve Apostles with geometric ornaments.

 

Read more →

Elizabeth Vigee LeBrun

Lead: In 1778, young French portrait painter Elisabeth Vigee LeBrun was summoned to Versailles to become the court painter of one of the most fascinating figures of French history—Queen Marie Antoinette.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Marie Louise Elizabeth Vigee LeBrun was born in Paris in 1755. She received art lessons from her father. She was largely self-taught at a time when female artists were denied admittance to art academies. By age fifteen, Vigee LeBrun had demonstrated such skill that she able to help support her widowed mother and brother. At the age of 20, at the insistence of her mother, Vigee LeBrun married their landlord, Jean Baptise Pierre LeBrun, an art dealer and artist. By copying many of the fine works around her, she later recalled that she “received the best lessons I could have attained.”

Read more →

Mexican Muralism

Lead: At the root of the explosion of graffiti on American public spaces was the revolutionary artistic movement known as Mexican Muralism.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Murals have been around since prehistoric times, but the modern genesis of the term in part originated with the Mexican "muralista" art movement. In the years following the Mexican revolution, during the 1920s and 1930s, native art, often with a powerful political message, began to decorate blank walls all over Mexico. Varying in quality, murals helped turn the cities into works of art. Muralists used open public spaces to call attention to a troubled society’s dreams, needs and hopes, revealing the need for social transformation. These murals could not be quickly eradicated, though the authorities tried. They were in-your-face, provocative, and demonstrated insistent demands by the artists for social justice.

Read more →

Howard Carter and the Tomb of Tutankhamen IV

Lead: Five years of failure and disappointment flashed away as Howard Carter looked through opening he had made. The young King came alive.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: The rule of Pharaoh Tutankhamen was a short one. He lived about 1350 years before Christ and died at seventeen, his rule brief, obscure and dominated by powerful advisors. He was buried and over the years the location of his small tomb was forgotten. Most Egyptologists had assumed the grave site to have been discovered but Carter and his partner George Lord Herbert Carnarvon thought otherwise and spent the five years before 1922 searching the Valley of the Kings near ancient Thebes for the young King's illusive tomb. After nearly giving up, on November 4th, workmen discovered a step cut into the rock of the Valley floor. Carter cabled his partner to come from England and Lord George arrived November 23rd. By that time a stairway and door were uncovered and Carter had found the name of Tutankhamen cut into the wall at several places. Two days later the corridor leading into the tomb had been cleared and he had reached a second door. At 4:00 PM Carter made a small hole in the door and looked in. Carnarvon recalled the scene. "Mr. Carter, holding a candle before him, put in his head." He did not say anything for two or three minutes, but kept me in rather painful suspense. I thought I had been disappointed again, and I said, "Can you see anything?" "Yes, yes," he replied. "It is wonderful."

 

Read more →

Howard Carter and the Tomb of Tutankhamen III

Lead: Howard Carter believed it was there and would not give up.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: The rule of Egyptian Pharaoh Tutankhamen was a short one. He lived about 1350 years before Christ and died at seventeen, his rule brief, obscure and dominated by powerful advisors. He was buried and over the years the location was forgotten. Ironically, this anonymity probably saved his tomb from plundering by graverobbers. Wealthy Egyptians would fill their graves with rich articles supposedly for use in the afterlife. Thieves and even some of the priests who buried them would take note of the tomb's location, wait a day or so, break in and clean it out.

 

Read more →