LFM: Elizabeth Zane and the Siege of Fort Henry

Lead: For 400 years service men and women have fought to carve out and defend freedom and the civilization we know as America. This series on A Moment in Time is devoted to the memory of those warriors, whose devotion gave, in the words of Lincoln at Gettysburg, the last full measure.

Intro: A Moment In Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: In one of the last skirmishes of the American Revolution Betty Zane performed an act of exceptional heroism. The City of Wheeling was established at the juncture of Wheeling Creek and the Ohio River in the panhandle of West Virginia. The name is taken from a Delaware Indian term meaning skull, or head, which refers to the beheading of a party of early settlers. The story of Elizabeth Zane comes out of that turbulent era.

 

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The Last Full Measure – Francis Marion, The Swamp Fox

Lead: For 400 years service men and women have fought to carve out and defend freedom and the civilization we know as America. This series on A Moment in Time (is presented by the people of _________ and) is devoted to the memory of those warriors, whose sacrifice gave, in the words of Lincoln at Gettysburg, the last full measure.

Content: From the opening of hostilities at Lexington and Concord in 1775 until signing of the Treaty of Paris in 1783, the Revolution was America's longest war until the Vietnam conflict. While tension between Loyalist and Patriot sympathizers continued throughout the former colonies, active fighting for the most part had shifted to the South after 1779. First Savannah, then Charleston fell, and British forces under Lord Cornwallis began a series of raids into the interior culminating in the Battle of Camden, South Carolina in August, 1780. Patriot forces under the command of General Horatio Gates suffered a disastrous defeat. After that there appeared almost nothing standing in the way of ultimate victory for the British commanders. In 1780 the fleeting hopes of American Independence were kept alive in the South by partisan guerrillas.

 

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Washington Assumes Command II

Lead: Though he had a certain magisterial demeanor, George Washington knew he was the servant of civilian rule.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: From the beginning, the American Republic vested ultimate power in the hands of people in the person of their elected representatives. Though the nation admired military leaders and has often elected them to power, republican sentiment has always distrusted the man on horseback and insisted that in peace and in war power rests with civilians.             In many ways this attitude, if not originating with George Washington, was certainly re-enforced by his respectful approach to his civilian masters and his willingness to give up power, twice in fact.

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America’s Revolution: First Continental Congress II

 

Lead: When, in September 1774, the First Continental Congress met in Carpenters’ Hall in Philadelphia, tensions between Great Britain and her rebellious colonies had reached fever pitch.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: After the Boston Tea Party the previous year, the English Parliament passed what the colonists called the Intolerable Acts. In protest, a convention of delegates from the colonies gathered in Philadelphia to organize resistance to the Acts and to facilitate colonial unity. This convention came to be known as the First Continental Congress. It was made up of fifty-six delegates from twelve of the thirteen colonies (since Georgia’s royal governor had been able to block his delegates from attending). The convention met in September and October. Leaders of the Congress included Samuel Adams, John Jay, George Washington, Patrick Henry, Richard Henry Lee, John Adams, and Peyton Randolph of Virginia, who was elected President. With a few exceptions, those gathering in Philadelphia at this time did not want independence, but rather used the meeting to express grievances against royal policy and to persuade the London government to recognize the colonials’ basic rights.

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Washington Assumes Command I

Lead: When he returned home in 1783, he was the most famous man in the world. It all started eight years before.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: In June 1775, the Continental Congress, itself willing to start a war but not yet to declare American independence, appointed George Washington of Virginia its military commander and sent him off to Boston to confront 10,000 British troops occupying the port. In the course of nine months he would meet the men with whom he would prosecute America’s longest-declared war, he would experiment with those strategic martial impulses that for good and for ill sustained his Army and the country through to the end, and would begin the process of maturation that would shape him into the nation’s most consequential founder.

 

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America’s Revolution: First Continental Congress I

 

Lead: In early spring 1774, the British Parliament, angered over colonial insubordination, passed a series of acts that would prove the law of unintended consequences. They would ignite a revolution.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Just before Christmas the previous year in Boston harbor, colonial agitators, disguised as Native Americans, removed thousands of pounds of British East India Company Tea from cargo holds and threw them in the water. The Company was in debt and needed a political boost. It was able to persuade Parliament to permit the sale of tea direct to American consumers, thereby undercutting local merchants. A tiny little import tax was assigned to the tea. Thus followed the Boston Tea Party. This act of defiance sent the House of Commons into a rage and in retaliation it passed what was known in America as the Coercive or Intolerable Acts. The port of Boston was closed until restitution was paid British East India, the independent legislative  powers of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts were restricted, British officials, arrested in America, were removed from colonial jurisdiction and transported to England for trial, and colonials were required to quarter royal troops in their homes.

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Jamestown Journey – England and Virginia, the Bands that Break II

Lead: Unrest in the early 1770’s in Virginia quickly grew into full-scale rebellion. Yet, Parliament would not relent.

Intro.: Dan Roberts and A Moment in Time with Jamestown - Journey of Democracy, tracing the global advance of democratic ideals since the founding of Jamestown, Virginia in 1607.

Content: In response to the “tea parties” in Virginia and particularly Boston, the British Parliament in the Spring of 1774 passed the Massachussetts Government Act, the Administration of Justice Act, the Boston Port Act, and the Quartering Act, known collectively as the “Intolerable Acts”. While the Acts were most harshly laid on Boston, many Virginians saw the attack as a thinly disguised assault on all colonial freedoms. Fiery young Virginia Burgesses, Thomas Jefferson, Patrick Henry, and Richard Henry Lee, led the House in adopting strong resolutions against the Acts. In response an angry Governor Dunmore dissolved the General Assembly.

 

 

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America’s Revolution: Taxation Without Representation III

 

Lead: In the 1700s the United States broke from England. No colony in history had done that before. This series examines America’s Revolution.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

Content: Severe financial burdens resulting from British involvement in the French and Indian War caused the government in London to seek revenues from the thirteen North American colonies, essentially to pay for a peaceful frontier and oceans free for colonial commerce. Surprisingly there were calls by some in Britain proposing colonial representation in Parliament. Adam Smith, Edmund Burke and for a time, Benjamin Franklin, Pennsylvania’s representative in London, advocated some form of Colonial seats in the commons, but these proposals went nowhere and were not revived until long after the beginning of open hostilities in the late 1770s. Ironically, American radicals ultimately squelched the idea of colonial representation. They were convinced that if there were Americans seated at Westminster, there would be no restraint on Parliamentary enthusiasm for draining colonial pockets. Better to argue that Parliament had no right to tax the colonies, period.

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