Betsy Ross, Entrepreneur

Lead:      Though probably alien to her in that era, if the word entrepreneur does not describe Elizabeth Griscom Ross Ashburn Claypoole, the woman we know as Betsy Ross, who does it describe?

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Defying her parents and the Quaker community, Philadelphian Elizabeth Griscom, called “Betsy,” eloped in 1773 with Anglican John Ross. Both were apprentice upholsterers. The Rosses’ established a home and upholstery business on what was then Mulberry Street in Philadelphia.  At marriage, Betsy was not pregnant, though thirty percent of American pregnancies between 1761 and 1800 were “short-term” or pre-marital conceptions.

 

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LFM: Elizabeth Zane and the Siege of Fort Henry

Lead: For 400 years service men and women have fought to carve out and defend freedom and the civilization we know as America. This series on A Moment in Time is devoted to the memory of those warriors, whose devotion gave, in the words of Lincoln at Gettysburg, the last full measure.

Intro: A Moment In Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: In one of the last skirmishes of the American Revolution Betty Zane performed an act of exceptional heroism. The City of Wheeling was established at the juncture of Wheeling Creek and the Ohio River in the panhandle of West Virginia. The name is taken from a Delaware Indian term meaning skull, or head, which refers to the beheading of a party of early settlers. The story of Elizabeth Zane comes out of that turbulent era.

 

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The Last Full Measure – Francis Marion, The Swamp Fox

Lead: For 400 years service men and women have fought to carve out and defend freedom and the civilization we know as America. This series on A Moment in Time (is presented by the people of _________ and) is devoted to the memory of those warriors, whose sacrifice gave, in the words of Lincoln at Gettysburg, the last full measure.

Content: From the opening of hostilities at Lexington and Concord in 1775 until signing of the Treaty of Paris in 1783, the Revolution was America's longest war until the Vietnam conflict. While tension between Loyalist and Patriot sympathizers continued throughout the former colonies, active fighting for the most part had shifted to the South after 1779. First Savannah, then Charleston fell, and British forces under Lord Cornwallis began a series of raids into the interior culminating in the Battle of Camden, South Carolina in August, 1780. Patriot forces under the command of General Horatio Gates suffered a disastrous defeat. After that there appeared almost nothing standing in the way of ultimate victory for the British commanders. In 1780 the fleeting hopes of American Independence were kept alive in the South by partisan guerrillas.

 

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Washington Assumes Command II

Lead: Though he had a certain magisterial demeanor, George Washington knew he was the servant of civilian rule.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: From the beginning, the American Republic vested ultimate power in the hands of people in the person of their elected representatives. Though the nation admired military leaders and has often elected them to power, republican sentiment has always distrusted the man on horseback and insisted that in peace and in war power rests with civilians.             In many ways this attitude, if not originating with George Washington, was certainly re-enforced by his respectful approach to his civilian masters and his willingness to give up power, twice in fact.

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America’s Revolution: First Continental Congress II

 

Lead: When, in September 1774, the First Continental Congress met in Carpenters’ Hall in Philadelphia, tensions between Great Britain and her rebellious colonies had reached fever pitch.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: After the Boston Tea Party the previous year, the English Parliament passed what the colonists called the Intolerable Acts. In protest, a convention of delegates from the colonies gathered in Philadelphia to organize resistance to the Acts and to facilitate colonial unity. This convention came to be known as the First Continental Congress. It was made up of fifty-six delegates from twelve of the thirteen colonies (since Georgia’s royal governor had been able to block his delegates from attending). The convention met in September and October. Leaders of the Congress included Samuel Adams, John Jay, George Washington, Patrick Henry, Richard Henry Lee, John Adams, and Peyton Randolph of Virginia, who was elected President. With a few exceptions, those gathering in Philadelphia at this time did not want independence, but rather used the meeting to express grievances against royal policy and to persuade the London government to recognize the colonials’ basic rights.

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Washington Assumes Command I

Lead: When he returned home in 1783, he was the most famous man in the world. It all started eight years before.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: In June 1775, the Continental Congress, itself willing to start a war but not yet to declare American independence, appointed George Washington of Virginia its military commander and sent him off to Boston to confront 10,000 British troops occupying the port. In the course of nine months he would meet the men with whom he would prosecute America’s longest-declared war, he would experiment with those strategic martial impulses that for good and for ill sustained his Army and the country through to the end, and would begin the process of maturation that would shape him into the nation’s most consequential founder.

 

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