American Revolution: The British Army in Hostile Colonial America II

Lead: In the 1700s the United States broke from England. No colony in history had done that before. This series examines America’s Revolution.
Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts
Content: In 1768, the British government stationed a permanent standing army in Boston to keep order and assist with tax collection. This was a bad idea. Englishmen on both sides of the Atlantic hated standing armies and soon the troops found themselves unwelcome and abused in all sorts of ways by the people they were supposed to control. Boston was not alone in experiencing the indignity and subjugation that a standing army inflicts upon the population.

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American Revolution: The British Army in Hostile Colonial America I

Lead: In the 1700s the United States broke from England. No colony in history had done that before. This series examines America’s Revolution.
Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts
Content: On October 1, 1768 soldiers of the 14th and 29th British regiments debarked from transports and landed in Boston, Massachusetts, guarded by British naval ships of the line. Responding to the request of Governor Bernard who had clearly lost control of the streets of Boston, the government in London had stationed a standing army in the colony to collect taxes and keep order. In the previous century, during the English Civil War and the Protectorate of Oliver Cromwell, Englishmen had endured the indignity and coercion of military occupation under the Parliamentary Army. There was nothing an Englishman hated more than a standing army and the royal government had chosen to inflict one on the colony most primed to despise such a move. Massachusetts was a Commonwealth whose governmental institutions, commercial society, and ordinary citizens, in the view of the royal Governor, were seditiously teetering on the edge of open rebellion.

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Presidential Wit: Abraham Lincoln

Lead: Of the weapons available to the politician, among the most powerful is humor. No one was better at wielding that weapon than Abraham Lincoln.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Few politicians can survive if they become an object of laughter and ridicule. On the other hand, those seeking office who have the ability to use humor as a weapon against opponents or as a means of giving themselves a more sympathetic and down-to-earth image, go a long way to winning the support and perhaps the affection of the electorate. A sense of humor is not required for election, but it helps, both to soften the blow of losing or, even better, to keep political success in correct perspective.

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First Ladies: Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy

Lead: The Massachusetts politician was twice rebuffed by the lovely socialite. It seemed their courtship couldn't quite get off the ground.

Intro.: "A Moment in Time" with Dan Roberts.

Content: John Fitzgerald Kennedy and Jacqueline Lee Bouvier seemed an ideal match. Both were Roman Catholic, aristocratic, wealthy and attractive, but both led very busy lives and he was involved in what seemed to be an up-hill campaign for the Senate.  

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The Know-Nothing Party II

Lead: Formed to resist the flood of immigrants in the 1850s, the Know-Nothing Party made prejudice pay big dividends at the ballot box.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: By 1853 the Order of United Americans had chapters in towns all over the country. Riding a wave of resentment against the huge influx of German and Irish immigrants, the Order was better known as the Know-Nothing movement. Legend says that it took its name from what members said to questions about the Order's secret meetings - "I know nothing."

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The Know-Nothing Party I

Lead: In 1854 the Know-Nothing Party riding a wave of anti-immigrant prejudice, rolled up victory after victory. Except for the pre-Civil War Republicans, it was the best third party showing in American history.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: The United States is nation of immigrants. Beginning with the Jamestown Colony in 1607, successive waves of aliens have sought a new life and prosperity in what they considered to be a land of opportunity. Crowding out the original Native Americans, whose ancient ancestors actually may have themselves emigrated from the eastern Asia, more strangers arrived each decade in search of a new home. Within a couple of generations, their families now firmly established, many of the newcomers considered themselves "native Americans" and looked with barely tolerant superiority at the next batch of immigrants spilling onto the docks of Boston, Philadelphia, and New York.

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Democrats & 1964 Convention IV

Lead: The decline of the Democratic Party in the late 20th century can be attributed in part to its decision to champion black civil rights. This offended many racist Southern whites who migrated into the Republican Party.

Intro. : A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: The Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party emerged from voter registration efforts in the summer of 1964. One of its goals was to present a competing delegation to the Convention in Atlantic City in August. When the two groups arrived, the Party was in a quandary. Here was one group claiming the moral the high ground; some of its members, directly touched by the bloody Mississippi violence of that summer. The other group represented the vast majority of white Mississippians most of whom were opposed to black progress. Even party liberals, such as Senator Hubert Humphrey were conflicted.

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Democrats & 1964 Convention III

Lead: The slipping fortunes of the Democratic Party in 1990s can be seen in part to result from its decision to champion black civil rights. This trend was confirmed at Atlantic City in August 1964.

Intro. : A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: When he signed the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Lyndon Johnson, told one of his aides, Joseph Califano, “I think we’ve delivered the South to the Republican Party for your lifetime and mine.” While his accurate prediction was decades off the mark, the process that led to that Democratic Party implosion was confirmed at the quadrennial party gathering in Atlantic City that summer. One of the persons responsible for the party’s moral triumph, but steady political decline, was a soft-spoken, intellectual schoolteacher from New York named Bob Moses.

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