Reagan vs. Brown II

Lead: Champion of liberalism, in 1966 California Governor Pat Brown eagerly awaited the election against a political novice from L.A. His optimism was misplaced.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Brown's glee was aroused by the prospect of running against Ronald Wilson Reagan, a washed up actor who had become General Electric's corporate spokesman in the 1950s. He was a rising conservative political activist whose last-minute infomercial helped raise Republican spirits if not its vote count in the ill-fated Goldwater campaign of 1964. Brown thought he was a pushover and engaged in a little piece of political chicanery to help Reagan win. Brown's operatives released some political dirt about Reagan's opponent George Christopher. In the primary Reagan beat him badly.

 

 

Anatomy of a Presidential Scandal (Cleveland) II

Lead: After being nominated for President by the Democrats in the summer of 1884, Grover Cleveland was publicly accused of fathering an illegitimate child.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Cleveland was able to negotiate the shoals of scandal for several reasons. First, from the beginning, he told the truth. About 1871, widow Maria Halpin came from Jersey City to Buffalo where she found work in the retail clothing trade. She was a tall, stunning beauty, spoke French and soon was seen in the company of several men, one of whom was Grover Cleveland. Their relationship was intimate and sexual. When her son was born in the fall of 1874, she named him Oscar Folsom Cleveland, in honor of Cleveland and his law partner. Cleveland accepted responsibility and provided for both mother and child. When the scandal broke, he confided the truth to a number of prominent clergy and political leaders.

 

Anatomy of a Presidential Scandal (Cleveland) I

Lead: It is difficult to keep perspective at a time when passions are engaged and salacious revelations stir the body politic. Yet, such a time is the perfect occasion to examine the past to gain perspective by looking at the anatomy of a Presidential scandal.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Oh, to be a Democrat in the summer of 1884. Victory was in the air. For the first time since the nomination of James Buchanan in 1856 the Party had a real chance to take the White House. Every four years this ragtag collection of yellow dog dixiecrats and immigrant Yankees would drink and party their way to the nomination of a pair of political nonentities, who would then promptly go out and lose. Not this time. This time they had a winner.

 

First Ladies: Anna Eleanor Roosevelt III

Lead: After the death of her husband in 1945, First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt began a life of vigorous support for those causes that animated the couple during their marriage.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Released from the political restrictions of the White House, Eleanor Roosevelt followed her heart. She served on the board of the NAACP, helped found the liberal social pressure group Americans for Democratic Action, and actively stumped for her friend Illinois Governor Adlai Stevenson in two presidential campaigns. She continued to animate the faithful and irritate her enemies with a full schedule of lectures, writing, and activism. Her unconventional approach had made her a controversial First Lady, it didn’t stop after she left the White House.

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First Ladies: Anna Eleanor Roosevelt II

Lead: Beloved by millions and despised by many, in the White House Eleanor Roosevelt evolved into a most unconventional First Lady.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: When she first moved into the Executive Mansion, the wife of Franklin Roosevelt shocked the staff by helping re-arrange furniture in the family quarters and insisting on operating the ancient elevator herself. That was just the beginning. She did the conventional, ceremonial duties, but unlike other First Ladies, she became involved in the administration’s policies, had her own very popular newspaper column, and lectured around the country on a wide variety of topics.

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First Ladies: Anna Eleanor Roosevelt I

Lead: As a young woman Anna Eleanor Roosevelt, daughter of rich and glamorous parents, was painfully shy, insecure and inarticulate. She overcame it all.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Eleanor Roosevelt, the niece of one Roosevelt president, the distant cousin and wife of another, grew up in the privileged society of New York’s elite. She was a disappointment to her handsome mother who considered Eleanor to be rather plain. Her father adored her but was too often absent from the family. She grew into a young woman with profound insecurities that began to dissipate only at the age of 15 when she was sent to a finishing school in a fashionable London suburb. The headmistress, the political and religious liberal Marie Souvestre, took special interested in Eleanor. In addition to strict discipline Mademoiselle Marie conveyed important social lessons. The girl emerged as a thoughtful gentlewoman with an appealing charm.

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Whiskey Rebellion IV

Lead: In the winter of 1794 President George Washington sent an army into western Pennsylvania to put down a rebellion among farmers opposed to a federal tax on whiskey.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Passed to pay the lingering debts run up by the former colonies in the American Revolution, the excise tax on whiskey was deeply resented by farmers in the west who distilled spirits and used them for medicine as well as a form of money, trading whiskey for farm supplies, clothing and most other needed goods. When a citizen militia led by back country lawyer David Bradford threatened to sever western Pennsylvania from the rest of the state or perhaps even secede from the Union, President George Washington declared them traitors and sent a delegation to investigate and an Army to put down the rebellion.

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Whiskey Rebellion III

Lead: Aroused by the imposition of an excise tax on whiskey, farmers on the frontier of Western Pennsylvania took on the fledgling national government of George Washington.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: In 1791, to pay off debts run up by the colonies in their fight for independence, the U.S. government, at the urging of Secretary of the Treasury Alexander Hamilton, passed a tax on whiskey. This tax struck at the livelihood of frontier farmers who could not get their grain east to market and so made it into whiskey, which they used for medicine and traded for all sorts of goods. It was their money.

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