The Mason-Dixon Line

Lead: The most famous boundary in United States history originated in a eighty year dispute between two colonies.

Intro.: "A Moment in Time" with Dan Roberts.

Content: One of last parts of Colonial Maryland along the Chesapeake Bay to attract settlers was northeast of present day Baltimore. The soil was there heavier and not as hospitable to the growth of tobacco as in the southern reaches of the Bay. This area was good for the cultivation of wheat and corn and as trade with the hungry West Indies expanded, the area began to draw more development. Unfortunately, this brought Maryland into conflict with Pennsylvania. Lord Baltimore's charter promised Maryland land up to the fortieth parallel which in 1632 was the southern border of New England, but in the meantime the government in London had made other promises particularly to William Penn and by the 1730s it was obvious that these grants were in conflict with the Maryland charter. For instance the principal city of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, was significantly south of the fortieth parallel.

The Smoke-Filled Room II

Lead: Nominated on the ballot in a previously dead-locked convention, rumors began to spread that the choice of Warren Gamaliel Harding at the 1920 Republican Convention was brokered in a smoke-filled room.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: In early 1920, months before the convention, Harry M. Dougherty, Harding's campaign manager, seeing the possibility of a dead-lock between front-runners Leonard Wood and Frank Lowden, engaged in a little political speculation which probably gave birth to the myth of the smoke-filled room. He said in an interview, "I don't expect Senator Harding to be nominated on the first, second or third ballot, but I think ... that about eleven minutes after two o'clock on Friday morning at the convention, ...fifteen or twenty men, somewhat weary, ...sitting around a table, ...one of them will say: 'Who will we nominate?' At that decisive time the friends of Senator Harding can suggest him." It was pure speculation but of such are myths born.

The Smoke-Filled Room I

Lead: Nominated on the ballot in a previously dead-locked convention, rumors began to spread that the choice of Warren Gamaliel Harding at the 1920 Republican Convention was brokered in a smoke-filled room.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: In early 1920, months before the convention, Harry M. Dougherty, Harding's campaign manager, seeing the possibility of a dead-lock between front-runners Leonard Wood and Frank Lowden, engaged in a little political speculation which probably gave birth to the myth of the smoke-filled room. He said in an interview, "I don't expect Senator Harding to be nominated on the first, second or third ballot, but I think ... that about eleven minutes after two o'clock on Friday morning at the convention, ...fifteen or twenty men, somewhat weary, ...sitting around a table, ...one of them will say: 'Who will we nominate?' At that decisive time the friends of Senator Harding can suggest him." It was pure speculation but of such are myths born.

The Smoke-Filled Room I

The Smoke-Filled Room - I

Lead: One of the persistent myths of American politics was that Warren Gamaliel Harding was nominated at the 1920 Republican Convention by political bosses meeting in a smoke-filled room.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: The campaign for the Republican nomination of 1920 was waged during a time in which Americans, weary of war and divisions within both political parties, were ready to settle down to less intense tumult. U.S. Senator Warren Harding, the newspaper publisher turned politician from Marion, Ohio was a candidate suited for such a mood. He was affable, generous, and pleasant with an aggressive, gregarious campaign style. He based his political climb on offending as few people as possible. Besides, he just looked like a President. One of his earliest supporters, recalls his own reaction on meeting Harding around the turn of the century, "What a President he'd make!"

First Ladies: Jane Pierce

Lead: For Jane Pierce the White House was an ever-present dread.

Tag: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Franklin and Jane Pierce were a study in contrasts. He was a tall, robust, physically vigorous person, addicted to glad handing New Hampshire politics. She was shy, frail, deeply religious and hated politics. They met one day when both were students at Bowdoin College in Maine and Franklin rescued the frightened girl during a powerful thunderstorm. There began a long courtship which ended when she married then Congressman Pierce in 1834.

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Texas Invades New Mexico

Lead: After independence the new Republic of Texas experienced some acute growing pains.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Texas won its independence from Mexico in 1836. The disaster of the Alamo was soon followed by the defeat of Mexican General Santa Anna at San Jacinto. Sam Houston's experience as Governor of Tennessee and popularity as the architect of Texas' victory carried him into the Presidency of the New Republic.

Susan B. Anthony II

Lead: Devoted to a succession of causes, Susan Brownell Anthony did not hesitate to challenge laws she felt were discriminatory.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: At the end of the Civil War, women's rights advocates renewed the struggle which had lain fallow as the North concentrated on saving the Union. In 1869, Susan Anthony and her associate Elizabeth Cady Stanton formed the National Women's Suffrage Association and a national newspaper, The Revolution, which in its short life vigorously addressed women's issues including problems they faced in the workplace. Despite the good reception Anthony was receiving around the country, it seemed to her that little real progress was being made, therefore she decided to take more direct action. In the elections of November 1872, she and a handful of women walked into the Rochester, New York registration office and demanded to be registered as voters. Four days later they cast their ballots, three weeks after that, Anthony was arrested.

Patrick Henry and the Parson’s Cause

Lead: In the 1700s the United States broke from England. No colony in history had done that before. This series examines America’s Revolution.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

Content: Having secured the support of the English Privy Council in striking down a Virginia statute that sought to relieve debtors facing ruin because of a spike in tobacco prices caused by drought, several Anglican clergymen set Virginian teeth on edge by suing to have their salaries paid at the full market rate, drought and inflation be damned. Their efforts were turned aside in two cases, but that of the most Rev. Mr. James Maury of Louisa County received favorable judgment from the court who then referred the case to a jury for a determination of the damages.