First Ladies: Mamie Doud Eisenhower

Lead: Through the years of lonely separation and worry that are part of the life of a military spouse, Mamie Geneva Doud Eisenhower never liked it but loved her Kansas farm boy and was there for the long haul.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Dwight Eisenhower was a second lieutenant fresh from West Point when he first laid eyes on Mamie Geneva Doud, daughter of a wealthy Denver family who wintered in San Antonio. She was standing on the porch of the Officer’s Club at Fort Sam Houston when as Officer of the Day he walked by on his rounds. She thought he was the most handsome male she had ever seen; he was struck with her vivacious personality and attractive, saucy looks. They were married in the summer of 1916.

 

 

 

 

 

 

First Ladies: Rosalynn Carter

Lead: By the time they reached the White House in 1977, Rosalynn and Jimmy Carter were beyond close, they were a political and personal team that regarded each other as full and equal partners.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Eleanor Rosalynn Smith grew up just a few miles from her husband in the tiny west Georgia town of Plains. She was the oldest of four and very close to her father, a farmer and auto mechanic, and Rosalynn always worked hard to succeed and to please her loving but strict parents. When Mr. Smith died of leukemia in the early 1940s, Rosalynn was forced to assume many responsibilities in the home, but she excelled academically and after high school studied at a nearby junior college. One of her best friends was Ruth Carter, whose brother Jimmy was three years older, a cadet at the Naval Academy in Annapolis. They had known each other all of their lives, but never were interested. That changed dramatically in 1945, and in a year they were married.

 

 

 

 

The Know-Nothing Party II

Lead: Formed to resist the flood of immigrants in the 1850s, the Know-Nothing Party made prejudice pay big dividends at the ballot box.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: By 1853 the Order of United Americans had chapters in towns all over the country. Riding a wave of resentment against the huge influx of German and Irish immigrants, the Order was better known as the Know-Nothing movement. Legend says that it took its name from what members said to questions about the Order's secret meetings - "I know nothing."

 

 

 

 

The Know-Nothing Party I

Lead: In 1854 the Know-Nothing Party riding a wave of anti-immigrant prejudice, rolled up victory after victory. Except for the pre-Civil War Republicans, it was the best third party showing in American history.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: The United States is nation of immigrants. Beginning with the Jamestown Colony in 1607, successive waves of aliens have sought a new life and prosperity in what they considered to be a land of opportunity. Crowding out the original Native Americans, whose ancient ancestors actually may have themselves emigrated from the eastern Asia, more strangers arrived each decade in search of a new home. Within a couple of generations, their families now firmly established, many of the newcomers considered themselves "native Americans" and looked with barely tolerant superiority at the next batch of immigrants spilling onto the docks of Boston, Philadelphia, and New York.

 

 

 

 

First Ladies: Sarah Childress Polk

Lead: The wife of the tenth President of the United States was the ideal political spouse: devoted, principled, and ambitious.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: In 1823 James Knox Polk was stuck in what he considered a dead end job as a clerk employed by the Tennessee legislature. He asked Andrew Jackson, just beginning his first run for the Presidency, what advice he would give for success in politics. Jackson told him, "stop this philandering...settle down as a sober married man." "Which lady shall I choose?" asked Polk. "The one who will never give you no trouble," replied Jackson, "you know her well." "You mean Sarah Childress?" Polk asked, thought a minute, went out and asked her to marry him. He never regretted the choice.

 

 

John Maynard Keynes Predicts Disaster-II

Lead: As part of the British delegation to the Versailles Peace Conference after World War One, John Maynard Keynes became increasingly disenchanted with the hostile attitude of the allies toward Germany.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: the conference was driven by three main leaders: Lloyd George of Great Britain, Clemenceau of France, and Wilson of the United States. The conference is needed to deal the divisions in Europe after four years of terrible fighting. It failed miserably.

John Maynard Keynes Predicts Disaster-I

Lead: Known primarily for his groundbreaking work on economics during the Great Depression, John Maynard Keynes first gained international renown after the World War I Versailles Peace Conference.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Keynes was born in the early 1880s to an academic family in Cambridge England. He studied at Eaton and then at King's College, Cambridge. He graduated with first-class honors in mathematics, but ironically tested poorly on economics. After university Keynes became a civil servant, working on currency issues at Britain's India Office.

Japan Opens to the West III

Lead: In the summer of 1853, a reluctant Japan opened its doors to trade with the rest of the world.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Matthew Calbraith Perry was 59 years of age in the year he led the expedition to Japan. He suffered from arthritis and spent much of the voyage in his cabin. He was the brother of Oliver Hazard Perry whose defeat of the British fleet secured Lake Erie for the United States in the War of 1812. Matthew's career included transportation of freed slaves to Africa after the founding of Liberia and combat command during the Mexican War. He had a regal bearing and was a very serious person. This formality stood him well in dealing with the traditionalist Japanese who were reluctant to give up their policy of non-involvement with the outside world.