Scopes Monkey Trial II

Lead: In the summer of 1925, in Dayton, Tennessee, William Jennings Bryan and Clarence Darrow met in legal conflict during the trial of John Thomas Scopes. Their clash was as much cultural as it was legal.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Scopes agreed to be the defendant in a case testing the constitutionality of the Butler Act which was Tennessee's attempt to prevent teaching of ideas in the public schools thought to be in conflict with the Bible. The prosecution invited William Jennings Bryan to lead its team. John Scopes accepted the help of Clarence Darrow in the defense.

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Abraham Lincoln’s Advice to Lawyers II

Lead: As a leader, Abraham Lincoln was inspiring but was also quite practical.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Following his death, Abraham Lincoln became for many the fallen leader struck down at the moment of triumph. Former enemies, who never in his life had a single good thing to say about the man, soon forgot their animus and joined with the rest of the country in an attitude of near worship. All of which would have probably amused the former President, who had an unusually clear understanding of human frailty and the fickle nature of politics.

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Abraham Lincoln’s Advice to Lawyers I

Lead: Few Americans have excited the nation's admiration and respect as Abraham Lincoln. He also could be a very practical man.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Almost from the beginning of his career as a prairie lawyer, Abraham Lincoln was a success. Born in Kentucky in 1809, he migrated with his family to Indiana and then to Illinois. His self-education is the stuff of legend and he played with various occupations until settling on the practice of law. In 1836 he was sufficiently prepared to pass the bar and began his practice, first in New Salem then Springfield. He worked hard, followed the judges on their circuits, and soon was making a handy living. More than the judges, more than the Governor of the state.

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Margaret Garner: Fugitive Slave Case II

Lead: In 1856 fugitive slave Margaret Garner arrested while trying to escape attempted the unthinkable. To prevent her children from being returned to slavery, she killed one and tried to kill the others.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: After crossing the frozen Ohio River near Cincinnati Garner’s family were in hiding when the posse led by her owner, Archibald Grimes closed in. Margaret killed her two and one half year old daughter, Mary, and attempted to kill the others. Margaret herself was mulatto and her murdered daughter was described as “almost white.” It is probable that the father of at least some of Margaret’s children was actually Grimes, her owner. Garner’s husband worked on a neighboring plantation.

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Margaret Garner: Fugitive Slave Case I

Lead: On a snowy January morning in 1856, young Kentucky slave, Margaret Garner, and her family crossed the frozen Ohio River. What followed electrified a nation torn apart by slavery.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: The Fugitive Slave Law was part of the Compromise of 1850. This federal law made it illegal for a citizen to aid a runaway slave. Other laws facilitated the return of runaway slaves. Many in the North fervently opposed these laws and established the Underground Railroad to help fugitive slaves reach safe jurisdictions in the north or cross the border into Canada.

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The Mason-Dixon Line

Lead: The most famous boundary in United States history originated in a eighty year dispute between two colonies.

Intro.: "A Moment in Time" with Dan Roberts.

Content: One of last parts of Colonial Maryland along the Chesapeake Bay to attract settlers was northeast of present day Baltimore. The soil was there heavier and not as hospitable to the growth of tobacco as in the southern reaches of the Bay. This area was good for the cultivation of wheat and corn and as trade with the hungry West Indies expanded, the area began to draw more development. Unfortunately, this brought Maryland into conflict with Pennsylvania. Lord Baltimore's charter promised Maryland land up to the fortieth parallel which in 1632 was the southern border of New England, but in the meantime the government in London had made other promises particularly to William Penn and by the 1730s it was obvious that these grants were in conflict with the Maryland charter. For instance the principal city of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, was significantly south of the fortieth parallel.

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Sacco and Vanzetti III

Lead: The trial of Sacco and Vanzetti has continued to spark controversy long after their execution.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: This much is certain. On April 15, 1920 a payroll clerk and his guard were robbed and killed in South Braintree, Massachusetts. There were three involved and two more in the getaway car, a Buick. Sacco and Vanzetti, two Italian immigrants, friends involved in anarchist politics, were arrested after trying to pick up a similar car from a local garage. Harassed by the mechanic, they fled in a suspicious manner. After that the case is powerful but largely circumstantial.

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Sacco and Vanzetti II

Lead: Nicola Sacco and Bartolomeo Vanzetti emigrated to America to find a better life. The transition to their new home proved a difficult one.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Nicola Sacco came from a prosperous farm family in southern Italy. He arrived in the United States when he was seventeen and married Rosina in 1913. He was a hardworking shoe repairman who spent much of his spare time in his garden often giving excess produce to poor families in the area. He became attracted to the cause of anarchism and during World War I he fled the country to avoid the draft.

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