Lost H-Bomb

Lead: In January 1966, at the height of the Cold War, an armed U.S. Air Force B-52 crashed during a routine refueling over the Mediterranean coast of Spain. In the process, it lost a hydrogen bomb.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: The giant B-52 was part of the Strategic Air Command’s regular flights to the edge of Soviet air space. Fully loaded, it held four H-bombs, each 100 times more powerful than the bomb that destroyed Hiroshima. To make such a long trip from the continental United States required refueling, and as it approached the KC-135 jet tanker on January 17, 1966, the bomber accidentally rammed the refueling boom, destroying both planes. Aircraft parts and radioactive debris rained down on the Spanish countryside. Three bombs were recovered, but the United States had to endure the embarrassment that a fourth went missing. It had lost a nuclear bomb somewhere over Spain.

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A House Divided: Union Spring, 1862 III

Lead: One hundred and fifty years ago the Republic was facing its greatest crisis. This continuing series examines the American Civil War. It is "A House Divided."

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: With the fall of Fort Donelson on the Cumberland River on February 16, 1862, the North had a new hero. U.S. or “Unconditional Surrender” Grant, named for his demand that the garrison at Fort Donelson give up immediately with no conditions, was promoted to Major General and gradually began to orchestrate the collapse of Confederate control of western Tennessee and northern Mississippi. In short order Union forces swept out of Kentucky into Middle Tennessee, forcing the evacuation of Nashville and the fall of the first Confederate state capital.

 

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A House Divided: Overland Campaign I

 

Lead: One hundred and fifty years ago the Republic was facing its greatest crisis. This continuing series examines the American Civil War. It is "A House Divided."

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: President Lincoln would say it later but he understood a fundamental fact as spring turned to summer 1864. “Upon the progress of our arms, all else chiefly depends.” His re-election, emancipation and the restoration of the Union would not at any point be achieved by negotiation. In his message to Congress outlining discussions with Jefferson Davis that lamentable summer, he wrote that “Davis does not attempt to deceive us. He cannot voluntarily reaccept the Union, we cannot voluntarily yield it. Between him and us the issue is distinct, simple and inflexible. It is an issue which can only be tried by war, and decided by victory.

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A House Divided: Was Secession Constitutional? I

Lead: One hundred and fifty years ago the Republic was facing its greatest crisis. This continuing series examines the American Civil War. It is "A House Divided."

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: The American crisis of 1860-1861 brought into bold relief one of the most important constitutional questions left unresolved by the Founders: just what were the parameters of Federal and State sovereignty? Where did the powers of the new Union begin and end and did a State, having committed itself to the united Republic, have the right resist the power of the Federal government and ultimately separate itself in an act of secession? In other words, was secession constitutional?

 

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A House Divided: Was Secession Constitutional? II

Lead: One hundred and fifty years ago the Republic was facing its greatest crisis. This continuing series examines the American Civil War. It is "A House Divided."

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: When the South removed itself from the Union in 1860 and 1861, its partisans asserted that it was perfectly within its constitutional rights to exit from said compact, because states had freely joined the United States by ratifying the constitution. States that had joined could unjoin, therefore any attempt to force them to remain in the Union was an illegitimate enterprise. Secession was clearly constitutional.

 

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A House Divided: Was Secession Constitutional? III

Lead: One hundred and fifty years ago the Republic was facing its greatest crisis. This continuing series examines the American Civil War. It is "A House Divided."

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Was secession constitutional? That was a major issue as the South departed in 1861. The Constitution, historical reality, and events in the next four years, proved that it was not. Whereas the states have retained a rich source of alternative initiatives, experimentation, governmental creativity and efficiency, at each stage of the nation’s development, when states have asserted their ability to abridge Federal power, Federal sovereignty prevailed.

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Panama Canal Diplomacy & Construction I

Lead: The construction of the Panama Canal was as much a triumph of manipulative diplomacy as it was the result of engineering genius. It took nearly a century to be set right.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: At the end of the nineteenth century the great powers of Europe were scrambling to absorb the few remaining parts of the world free of empire. In 1898 they were joined by the United States which in that imperial summer in short order had come to control Cuba, Puerto Rico, the Philippines and Hawaii. However reluctant, the United States now was a colonial power with holdings in two oceans, and desired, needed and planned a canal to shorten the travel time between them.

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Americans and Taxation I

Lead: On February 3, 1913, the sixteenth amendment to the Constitution was adopted – making the income tax a permanent part of life in the United States.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Until the Civil War, the United States government relied heavily on tariffs (the taxes on imported goods) for revenue. Although the Constitution prohibited the government from imposing a direct tax on citizens, in 1862, during the Civil War, Congress passed an act which authorized the collection of the income tax in order to help finance a war that was costing the United States treasury one million dollars a day by 1862. With the Republic under threat, resistance to the income tax was not widespread. The wartime emergency income tax was reduced after the war and repealed in 1872.

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