America’s Revolution: The Bishop’s Palace II

Lead: In the 1700s the United States broke from England. No colony in history had done that before. This series examines America’s Revolution.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

Content: The religious affiliation of most Americans was not inclined toward the Church of England. They were evangelicals or liberals or perhaps not even religious at all and enjoyed in America a rich tradition of religious freedom. Many of their ancestors had migrated to North America to escape what they sensed was hostility to their approach to religion in the government of England and Scotland as administered by the Anglican Church. The structure of hierarchy in that Church aroused little enthusiasm among colonists who were generally unsympathetic to establishments of any type. Such was part of the American DNA.

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America’s Revolution: The Bishop’s Palace I

Lead: In the 1700s the United States broke from England. No colony in history had done that before. This series examines America’s Revolution.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

Content: In 1770 Lord North became King George III’s First Minister. He was a gentle soul with a determination to tamp down on colonial disputes. His government quickly repealed all of the Townshend revenue acts, leaving only a tax on tea and the Declaratory Act to remind the colonies that Parliament was determined to retain its right to extract revenues. This ushered in a period which some at the time called a “pause in politics,” with no giant issue animating colonial anger and resistance. That is until there was one. That was the issue of religion.

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A House Divided: (50) The Martyr of Harper’s Ferry – II

Lead:  One hundred and fifty years ago the Republic was facing its greatest crisis. This continuing series examines the American Civil War. It is A House Divided.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: After capturing the Federal Armory in Harper’s Ferry in October, 1859, John Brown awaited the arrival of the authorities. They came in form of a detachment of marines commanded by Col. Robert E. Lee of Virginia. They stormed the engine house, captured a slightly wounded Brown and in less than 40 hours his grand illusion had fallen apart.

A House Divided: (49) The Martyr of Harper’s Ferry – I

Lead:  One hundred and fifty years ago the Republic was facing its greatest crisis. This continuing series examines the American Civil War. It is A House Divided.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.


Content: He was a murderer whose grand scheme included a vast destruction of white southerners in a slave uprising, but in the white hot discourse that was the national conversation in America of the 1850s, he became for many opposed to slavery a martyr to the cause.

Compromise of 1833 IV

Lead: Conflict over a protective tariff almost produced Civil War in the United States in 1833.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Angered over protective tariffs which benefited Northern industry and hurt Southern farmers, Southerners, led by United States Vice-President John C. Calhoun of South Carolina in the early 1830s, advocated nullification. If states were convinced the Federal government had passed laws that were unconstitutional, they could nullify them, declare them inoperative inside their state's boundaries.

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Compromise of 1833 III

Lead: The debate over a protective tariff nearly brought the United States to Civil War in 1833.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: In the late 1820s, Northern manufacturers wanted a high tariff to protect their businesses from foreign competition. Southern farmers despised protective tariffs. They wanted free trade to buy cheaper goods from Europe and to discourage other countries from imposing retaliatory tariffs which made it harder to sell Southern rice and cotton overseas.

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Compromise of 1833 II

Lead: In late 1832 the state of South Carolina declared that it had the right to nullify or ignore Federal law within its boundaries.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: At its heart, the U.S. Constitution was a compromise, more precisely, it was a series of compromises, between rural and urban areas, between small states and large ones, between those living on the frontier and maritime interests on the coast, between slaveholders and those opposed to this institution and embarrassed by its glaring violation of the nation's ideals.

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Compromise of 1833 I

Lead: There are several themes of conflict or faultlines that run through United States History. One of the most important is the tension between Federal and local government.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: After the failure of the first post-revolutionary experiment in government, the Articles of Confederation, it became clear to the founders that if the United States was to grow and prosper, the individual states must surrender a significant portion of their power to the national government. The Constitution and its first ten amendments, known as the Bill of Rights, gave certain responsibilities to the central regime among which were foreign policy, the declaration of war, and the federal judiciary. However, the Constitution specifically retained significant power in the hands of the states and also left many other questions to be decided in the future.

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