Otis v. Hutchinson II

Lead: In the 1700s the United States broke from England. No colony in history had done that before. This series examines America’s Revolution.

 Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

 Content: Thomas Hutchinson hailed from an old Massachusetts family. His ancestor Anne Hutchinson had been banished in the early years of the colony for unorthodox religious opinions, but her descendant was a solid citizen, a Harvard graduate, and a wealthy, successful merchant. As Lt. Governor and Chief Justice of the Superior Court, during the Stamp Act Crisis of 1765, he came to represent accommodation to the desires of the British parliament to tax the American colonies to pay for British troops stationed in America.

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Otis v. Hutchinson I

Lead: In the 1700s the United States broke from England. No colony in history had done that before. This series examines America’s Revolution.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

Content: One of the most important results of the growing antipathy between Britain and its North American colonies in the 1760s was the significant political re-alignment within the colonies that arose out that conflict. Old alliances within the colonies, such as among the first families of Virginia of Virginia, built on beneficial economic connections with London, came under attack from new forces more than willing to consider an independent course for American society, politics and business. The Stamp Act Crisis of 1765 gave these new factions a chance to identify the old alliances as pawns of Great Britain, responsible for unpopular and what many considered to be unconstitutional taxation without representation, and in some cases allied with London in undermining American liberty.

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Spy Satellites

Lead: It was mid-August 1960. In a White House ceremony, President Dwight D. Eisenhower displayed a United States flag that been recovered from an environmental satellite orbiting the earth. He wasn’t exactly telling the whole truth.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Actually, the flag had been carried into orbit aboard Discoverer XIII and was returned to earth in an ejected capsule which was then recovered from its splash down point northwest of Hawaii by a Navy taskforce. It was the first time an object had been catapulted into earth orbit and brought back without mishap, but this exercise was far more than patriotic chauvinism. The Discoverer program was a ruse, a clever cover-up for a secret reconnaissance operation known as Corona.

Trial of Henry Ward Beecher II

Lead: Part of a famous family of educators, clergymen and activists, Henry Ward Beecher was charged with adultery in 1875.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Henry Ward Beecher was perhaps the most famous American clergyman of his generation. After pastorates in the Midwest, he served as minister of the Plymouth Church in Brooklyn, New York for twenty-five years. Employing a casual, yet animated preaching style that drew large crowds to the church week after week, Beecher built a reputation as a powerful advocate of liberal causes such as opposition to liquor and slavery and the advocacy of women's rights.

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Trial of Henry Ward Beecher I

Lead: Religion was important in nineteenth-century America. Its influence was in no way better demonstrated than in the prominence of the Beecher family.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Religion has played a vital role in the shaping of the American experience. While the Founders created a secular state, it was in many ways the only choice they had. So prevalent was religion in its various forms that only a government that was neutral could possibly deal fairly with all the churches and sects that had established themselves in America even by the 1780s. The Founders were determined that no state church would encumber the tender consciences or drain the pocketbooks of those of the unwilling. The Founders were also painfully aware of the scars that remained on the European landscape after three centuries of religious warfare and intolerance. However, this official secular bias or lack of bias did not mean Americans were irreligious. In fact, the history of the United States is replete with examples of the powerful influence of religion over political, social, and economic life. Even in the late twentieth century church attendance and participation in America outstripped that of any other developed country.

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Gambling Comes to Nevada

Lead: Mired in the Great Depression, to create jobs the state of Nevada legalized gambling.

Intro.: "A Moment In Time" with Dan Roberts.

 Content: Nevada was the last area of the continental United States to be explored by Europeans. In the early 1800s British and American fur traders crossed the territory and then returned to trap along the Humboldt River the late 1820s. After gold was discovered in California in 1848, thousands of people crossed Nevada on their way to the Pacific Coast. Acquired from Mexico by the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo in 1848, Nevada became a separate territory after a dazzling silver strike, the Comstock Lode, near Virginia City. The discovery brought thousands seeking a bonanza some of whom stayed and helped make Nevada a state in 1864.

 

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Samuel Tilden and Tammany Hall II

Lead:  The power of the Tammany political organization in New York City was broken when one of its former allies, Sam Tilden, joined the forces of reform.

Intro.: "A Moment In Time" with Dan Roberts.

Content: Samuel J. Tilden rose to prominence as one of the first great corporation lawyers in America. He made a fortune representing railroad interests in New York and his ambition carried him to the chairmanship of the New York State Democratic Committee, a term as governor of New York, and to the threshold of the White House.

 

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Samuel Tilden and Tammany Hall I

Lead: Sam Tilden, who lost the most controversial election in United States history, made his reputation helping destroy the power of Tammany Hall.

Intro.: "A Moment In Time" with Dan Roberts.

Content:  In 1876 Samuel J. Tilden won the popular vote in the Presidential election but lost the Electoral vote after furious maneuvering in the Congress. He got to that pinnacle by helping to clean up corruption in New York. During the middle decades of the nineteenth century, Empire State politics was dominated by Tammany Hall. The Society of Tammany was a working class political club in the City of New York and had been a force in that state's politics since the years just after the American Revolution. Tammany helped promote the political ambitions of Aaron Burr who rose to be Vice-president of the United States but fell in disgrace after he shot Alexander Hamilton in a duel. By 1860 Tammany had enormous power over political elections and patronage in New York. The organization was dominated by William Marcy Tweed and his associates who were known as the Tweed Ring.

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