Virginia Resolves I

Lead: In the 1700s the United States broke from England. No colony in history had done that before. This series examines America’s Revolution.

 Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

 Content: When word of the passage of the Stamp Act reached the colonies in Spring 1765 there was little immediate reaction, but in the latter days of May, the Virginia House of Burgesses passed a series of resolves so radical and strong that their passage set off a storm of protest and economic reprisals in the other colonies that within a year Parliament was forced to repeal the Act.

 

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Estee Lauder: Beauty Industry Innovator

Lead: The daughter of immigrants, Josephine Esther Mentzer, a.k.a. Estée Lauder set the industry standard for women’s beauty products in 20th Century America.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

Content: Esther grew up a borough girl in Queens, the ninth and last child of Max and Rose Mentzer. Early on she became fascinated with the creams and fragrances that her mother used and that her relatives sold in their stores. As a teenager she learned merchandizing and customer relations, caught up as she later wrote, “by pretty things and pretty people.” She learned early on from her Uncle John Schotz the benefits of hands-on selling demonstrating how products worked on the faces and hands of her customers.

American Revolution: Battle of Charleston Heights IV

Lead: In the 1700s the United States broke from England. No colony in history had done that before. This series examines America’s Revolution.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

Content: As the steamy morning of June 17, 1775 proceeded, British troops under General William Howe were trying to take out Americans defending strong breastworks thrown up along the front of Breed’s Hill in the Charlestown Heights across the harbor from Boston. Howe’s troops were trying to do something difficult under any circumstances: attack across open ground up-hill into the face of an entrenched enemy. Wave after wave of Britain’s finest were cut down until finally, the Americans exhausted their ammunition. When the firing stopped, the British troops spilled over the top of the Patriot breastworks, bayonets flashing. Cleaning up the remaining Americans there cost the British precious time. Meanwhile, Patriots led by Colonel William Prescott retreated from Breed’s Hill in relatively organized fashion under covering fire from their compatriots on the beach. Soon all were falling back at a run to Bunker Hill. They crossed over Bunker Hill and retreated back across the Charlestown Neck. By dusk the British controlled all of the Charleston peninsula up to the Neck.

American Revolution: Battle of Charleston Heights III

Lead: In the 1700s the United States broke from England. No colony in history had done that before. This series examines America’s Revolution.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

Content: Dawn, June 17, 1775 revealed a significant strategic shift in the siege of British-occupied Boston in that Patriot forces had occupied and fortified Breed’s Hill and Bunker Hill on the triangular-shaped Charlestown peninsula across the Bay northwest of the city. This was a threat the British had to engage. After much debate the four leaders Generals Thomas Gage, William Howe, John Burgoyne and Henry Clinton eventually decided on a troop landing near Moulton’s Hill on the Northeast corner of the peninsula. When British intentions became obvious, Colonel William Prescott who was leading Patriot defenders on the Charlestown Heights, realized his vulnerability to a flanking attack from the beach on his left. Prescott sent Captain Knowlton to block this approach. When re-enforced by regiments led by Colonels John Stark and James Reed, they lined up their men behind a temporary breastwork made of rocks and fence railing and prepared for the British assault.

American Revolution: Battle of Charleston Heights II

Lead: In the 1700s the United States broke from England. No colony in history had done that before. This series examines America’s Revolution.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

Content: The British Army under General Gage was locked up in Boston by New England Patriot regiments surrounding the city. Gage was also severely exposed should American forces occupy the heights, particularly those over the village of Charlestown: Bunker Hill, Breed’s Hill and Moulton’s Hill, 110, 75 and 35 feet high respectively. His fears were realized when word leaked out of his intention to fortify those hills and colonial military leaders led by Artemas Ward moved to grab the Charlestown Heights especially Bunker Hill.

Promontory Point

Lead: With thousands of acres of land and millions of dollars at stake, two great railroads rushed across the flat, barren Utah plains toward their marriage of iron.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: At 11 in the morning May 10, 1869, the Central Pacific's Jupiter pulled up to its assigned position just feet away from the Union Pacific's Number 119. It was a bright but cold day, about 1500 people were gathered including the president of the Central Pacific, Leland Stanford and the Union Pacific's Thomas C. Durant.

 

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U.S. Mid-term Elections of 1946

Lead:  Although the Democrats, led by Harry S. Truman, lost both Houses of Congress during the mid-term elections of 1946, Truman skillfully used the Republican majority to his benefit – and won the 1948 presidential election.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: After the death of Franklin Delano Roosevelt four months into his fourth term on April 12, 1945, barely-known Vice-president Harry S. Truman of Missouri became President. He stepped into the shoes of one many assumed was a giant. During Roosevelt’s presidency, Republicans had been unable to gain control of Congress.

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The Great Eastern

Lead: In November, 1857, Isambard Kingdom Brunel tried to launch his magnificent creation. Great Eastern, the heaviest object anyone had ever attempted to move, got stuck.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Brunel was one of the most successful engineers of his day. He constructed what was at that time, the world’s longest tunnel, several unusual railroad bridges, and finally, Great Eastern. Conceived as the first luxury liner, the ship was designed to carry 4,000 passengers in complete comfort, haul enough coal for a non-stop round-trip from England to Australia, and earn her inventors’ money back in a couple of years. No such luck. No profit was ever made with Great Eastern.