American Revolution: Stamp Act Crisis I

Lead: In the 1700s the United States broke from England. No colony in history had done that before. This series examines America’s Revolution.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

Content: George Grenville, Chief Minister to King George III, was trying to manage a looming British financial crisis, but primarily was looking for money to pay for British troops based in America. Having levied a tax on the molasses used to make colonial rum, he wanted more money. Therefore, in 1764 he began hinting that Americans should pay for the paper used to transact legal business in the colonies. No such official dealings could be conducted on paper not bearing a governmental stamp. The government would sell the paper to the colonists and by this raise money for the troops. Colonial representatives were beyond emphatic that this stamp tax would be met with resentment and resistance. Grenville even toyed with the colonies by seeming to seek their input on the method of collection, but in the end it became clear that he was just being disingenuous and was determined to levy the stamp tax no matter what.

First Ladies: Lou Henry Hoover

Lead: Married to one of the most reviled and revered Presidents in U.S. history, Lou Henry Hoover considered it a privilege to stand in his shadow.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Lou Henry was a banker’s daughter and met her husband the future President in the laboratory of their favorite Stanford Professor, geologist John Casper Branner. He was shy but they hit it off right away and shortly after he graduated, Lou and Herb Hoover were informally engaged.

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Ray Kroc and the World of Fast Food II

Lead: In the mid-1950s salesman extraordinaire Raymond Albert Kroc charmed the founders of a little restaurant chain into placing him in charge of expansion. His problem: feeble profits.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: As the consummate marketer, Kroc was able to sell franchises at a rapid rate, but there was no mechanism to force franchisees to adhere to McDonald’s business model and his obsession with “QSC – Quality, Service and Cleanliness.” The solution was to go into the real estate business. The company would buy the land and build the building and after a rigorous selection process sell the outlet to the franchisee, whom Kroc now considered his partner, at a ridiculously low rate. The conditions for operation were built into the lease for the property, the cost of which was determined by a graduated percentage of gross sales.

Ray Kroc and the World of Fast Food I

Lead: Born at the dawn of the twentieth century, master salesman Ray Kroc helped transform the way the world consumed food.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: After brief service as an ambulance driver trainee in World War II, Kroc began his professional life and gradually absorbed the craft of salesmanship. After nearly two decades with cup manufacturer Lily-Tulip, rising to mid-western sales-manager, Kroc became fascinated with the multispindled milkshake maker. He eventually bought the company, Prince Castle, and in the post-World War II business revival the company prospered.

American Revolution: Washington, New Commander III

Lead: In the 1700s the United States broke from England. No colony in history had done that before. This series examines America’s Revolution.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

Content: In 1755 London determined to capture Fort Duquesne, a fortress the French had built at the Forks of the Ohio near present-day Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, and drive the French from the Ohio valley. They sent a large expedition of British regulars under General Edward Braddock. George Washington joined Braddock’s staff as a Lt. Colonel, but on the trail, Washington became severely ill. Fortunately, he re-joined the Braddock column in time to participate in the Battle of the Monongahela. The British were ambushed and suffered a catastrophic defeat. Braddock was a brave but incompetent leader, unused to wilderness fighting, and when his forces stumbled into the French and their Native American allies, suffered a defeat counted among the worst the British suffered in the war. Braddock was killed and Washington rallied the remaining troops, took command of the rear guard and organized an orderly and strategic retreat even though he was still wracked with fever and a severe headache. His performance in battle and in the retreat won him admiration from his men and the authorities in both Virginia and London.

American Revolution: Washington, New Commander II

Lead: In the 1700s the United States broke from England. No colony in history had done that before. This series examines America’s Revolution.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

Content: In the years prior to his emergence on the national and international stage, in many ways the personal and professional destiny of George Washington was forged in the Ohio Valley. He knew the area because of his work as an aspiring surveyor of western lands. Because of this familiarity with the Ohio, in 1753, Virginia Governor Dinwiddie sent him and a small group of frontiersmen on a diplomatic mission to seek alliance with Iroquois nations and to deliver a letter demanding the French withdraw back into Canada. When the French politely rebuffed the Governor’s demand, Washington returned to Virginia and Dinwiddie published the diary of his journey which was read widely, even as far as London, thus enhancing his growing reputation.

American Revolution: Washington, New Commander I

Lead: In the 1700s the United States broke from England. No colony in history had done that before. This series examines America’s Revolution.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

Content: In late spring, 1775 George Washington of Virginia was elected by the Second Continental Congress as Commander-in-Chief of the newly created Continental Army. By early July he and his staff were in Boston to assume his new command. What he found must have given him pause. The troops handed into his care were badly led, poorly equipped, and sorely undisciplined. The man who arrived in Cambridge on July 2, 1775 to assume command of this motley assembly was ambivalent about the task he had accepted. Though he would remember his satisfaction when told of the American performance at the Battle of Charlestown Heights, often called the Battle of Bunker Hill or more precisely Breed’s Hill, this did not convince him that the colonial military enterprise could win through to victory. Facing down the most powerful nation in the world was not a commission that he accepted lightly. He protested to Congress that he was not equal to the task, but he took the command out of a profound sense of honor.

Virginia Resolves II

Lead: In the 1700s the United States broke from England. No colony in history had done that before. This series examines America’s Revolution.

 Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

 Content: Having laid before the Virginia House of Burgesses in May 1765 five resolutions condemning the revenue-enhancing Stamp Act recently passed by the British Parliament, Patrick Henry, newly-elected delegate from Louisa County and widely famous as a result of the court case known as the Parson’s Cause, rose to brilliantly defend the so-called Virginia Resolves. He did so in a manner so extravagantly provocative that in the minds of some present, he edged over the line into disloyalty to the Crown. He first did a historical riff reminding the listeners of Caesar’s Brutus and King Charles I’s Cromwell and anticipated that some American would rise to defend his Country from the acts of the current monarch, King George III. This was clearly incendiary language and the Speaker of the House, John Robinson, warned him that his rhetoric was edging very close to treason.

 

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