A House Divided: Total War I

Lead: One hundred and fifty years ago the Republic was facing its greatest crisis. This continuing series examines the American Civil War. It is "A House Divided."

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: War has never been pretty. Even when armies and nations attempted to regulate the conduct of warfare, for centuries non-combatants were inevitably drawn into the pain and suffering, their livelihoods, farms, homes, children, and the elderly. Long before the 20th century perfection of total war when machines of destruction rained down their devastation on enemy soldiers and their home-bound families alike, a glimpse of such coming horror played itself out in the States of Georgia and South Carolina during the American Civil War. The artist who sketched this gruesome canvas was Major General William Tecumseh Sherman who, if not the author of total war, was certainly one of its most visible early practitioners.

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America’s Revolution: Taxation Without Representation III

 

Lead: In the 1700s the United States broke from England. No colony in history had done that before. This series examines America’s Revolution.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

Content: Severe financial burdens resulting from British involvement in the French and Indian War caused the government in London to seek revenues from the thirteen North American colonies, essentially to pay for a peaceful frontier and oceans free for colonial commerce. Surprisingly there were calls by some in Britain proposing colonial representation in Parliament. Adam Smith, Edmund Burke and for a time, Benjamin Franklin, Pennsylvania’s representative in London, advocated some form of Colonial seats in the commons, but these proposals went nowhere and were not revived until long after the beginning of open hostilities in the late 1770s. Ironically, American radicals ultimately squelched the idea of colonial representation. They were convinced that if there were Americans seated at Westminster, there would be no restraint on Parliamentary enthusiasm for draining colonial pockets. Better to argue that Parliament had no right to tax the colonies, period.

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America’s Revolution: Taxation Without Representation II

Lead: In the 1700s the United States broke from England. No colony in history had done that before. This series examines America’s Revolution.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

Content: One of the important catalysts of the American Revolution was the French and Indian War and the crushing financial burden the war laid upon Great Britain. By 1763 the national debt was in excess of 120 million pounds, much of it expended to protect the North American colonies and take Canada from the French. The British people were being squeezed dry to pay for the war. The government of King George III thought it reasonable to tax the colonies to pay for their own defense. This was not an unreasonable course of action. Boston, even with a population of only 15,000, was the third largest port in terms of shipping tonnage in the English speaking world, behind Bristol and London. The British Navy made that trade possible and Americans contributed not one pound to naval support.

America’s Revolution: Taxation Without Representation I

 

Lead: In the 1700s the United States broke from England. No colony in history had done that before. This series examines America’s Revolution.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

Content: It is hard to believe, but as late as 1770 most people living in the colonies of North America thought of themselves as loyal subjects of the British Crown. Except for a few radicals, most Americans considered themselves ordinary faithful Englishmen who just happened to live 3000 miles to the west of the Irish Sea. In just six short years a Congress of the colonies had declared independence and was raising an army to banish the rule of King George III forever. The reason: taxes.

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A House Divided: Team of Rivals I

Lead: One hundred and fifty years ago the Republic was facing its greatest crisis. This continuing series examines the American Civil War. It is "A House Divided."

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: It is hardly an exaggeration to say that in winter and spring 1861 Abraham Lincoln faced a daunting series of challenges. Not only was the Republic disintegrating, with state after state pulling out of the Union, the elected but not-yet-sworn-in Chief Magistrate had to watch helplessly as events spun out of control with no power to arrest what was clearly becoming a slide into chaos.

 

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A House Divided: Missouri Secession I

Lead: One hundred and fifty years ago the Republic was facing its greatest crisis. This continuing series examines the American Civil War. It is "A House Divided."

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: In the early months of 1861 the leadership of both North and South were engaged in a delicate minuet to enlarge or diminish the numbers of states signing up for the new Confederacy. The upper south, Tennessee, North Carolina and especially Virginia had departed the Union by springtime. It remained to be seen if the slave border states Maryland, Kentucky and Missouri, would follow.

 

 

 

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LFM: Sousa’s Greatest March

 
Lead: For 400 years service men and women have fought to carve out and defend freedom and the civilization we know as America. This series on A Moment in Time is devoted to the memory of those warriors, whose devotion gave, in the words of Lincoln at Gettysburg, the last full measure.

Intro: A Moment In Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: On May 14, 1897 John Philip Sousa stood at the podium of the Philadelphia Academy of Music, lifted his baton, and began leading his greatest march. Two encores later the crowd was still on its feet.

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Nellie Ross

Lead: In 1924 Wyoming became the first state to elect a woman to the office of Governor. Nellie Tayloe Ross served for two years and went on to distinguished national service.

                 Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

                 Content: With the ratification of the 19th Amendment to the Constitution in August 1920, the right to vote became a national right for women. The question remained whether women, now able to vote, would also attain full parity in political participation. When would women be elected to local office or congress in numbers comparable to their percentage in the population? The answer was not too soon. Decades would pass before women would step forward to assume a leadership role anything close to that of men in commerce, social life and politics. Progress was slow. One exception was Nellie Ross.

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