The Seminole Indians – Part I

Lead: In 1817 the dramatic Seminole struggle for survival began. It was the first of three wars the U.S. fought to bring them to heel.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Seminole Indians were not native to Florida. They were a clan of Creek nation who lived in what is Georgia and Alabama. English settlers called them “Creeks” because they inhabited the banks of rivers and streams in the southeastern America. During the early 1700s, in search of fertile ground, to avoid other tribal groups and a desire to escape the conflict with the ever-increasing tide of Europeans some of the Creeks, called the “lower Creeks” (because they lived furthest south), moved into northern Florida, which was then Spanish territory. This group of Creeks, and other Native Americans living in this region, soon became known as the Seminoles, “runaways” perhaps a corruption of the Spanish word Cimarron, meaning “wild” or “runaway.”

 

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Teflon

Lead: In the history of industrial innovation, often the most profound discoveries come as accidents. Such was certainly the case with Teflon.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: In the years before they were considered by many to be harmful to the environment, chlorofluorocarbons, (CFCs) often known as Freon, brought a safe, efficient means of refrigeration into commercial and household use. Development of Freons emerged from a joint venture between the Frigidaire division of General Motors and the DuPont Chemical Company. Work with Freons led to the accidental discovery of Teflon. In spring 1938, two DuPont chemists were working with a promising new refrigerant, tetrafluoroethylene (TFE) combined with hydrochloric acid. As a convenience the TFE was stored in pressurized cylinders packed in dry ice. On the morning of April 6th, the chemists discovered that the TFE would not come out. When the cylinders were sawed open the interior walls were lined with a smooth, white, waxy substance. Something in the pressure and low temperature had caused the TFE to polymerize or solidify.

 

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The Founding and Early Years of Jamestown – II

Lead: On May 14, 1607, English colonists made their way ashore sixty miles upriver from the entrance to Chesapeake Bay. On that peninsula, now an island, they built Jamestown, the first permanent English settlement in North America.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Unfortunately, the settlers placed Jamestown in the wrong place. The leaders of the colony, sent out by the London-based Virginia Company, fearing an attack by the Spanish, placed their palisade on a peninsula thinking it would be more easily defended, but from the beginning the settlement was plagued with disease, starvation, dissension and Indian attacks.

 

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The Founding and Early Years of Jamestown – I

Lead: On the evening of December 19, 1606, in London, England, 144 men boarded three ships. Their destination: Virginia.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Having failed to plant a colony on Roanoke Island on the Outer Banks, with mounting anxiety by 1606 England was determined to gain a grip on the land they claimed in North America. They called it Virginia (in honor of Elizabeth I, the Virgin Queen).  Three ships set sail that December, the Susan Constant, Godspeed, and Discovery. Their voyage was a long one 5000-miles the company commanded by Captain Christopher Newport.

 

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Mary Cassatt II

Lead: In 1877 in Paris, France, young American artist Mary Cassatt received an invitation from Edgar Degas, one of the most celebrated of French Impressionist.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: By 1877, Philadelphian Mary Cassatt had settled permanently in Paris. Although her paintings had been accepted by the prestigious but conventional Paris Salon for several years, she grew contemptuous of the jury system of the Salon after one of her finest portraits was rejected because it was too bright and then accepted the following year after she deliberately darkened the background to make it look more academic.

 

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Mary Cassatt I

Lead: In 1866, twenty-two year old Philadelphia artist, Mary Cassatt, against her family’s wishes, moved to Paris. There she became the only American invited to exhibit her works with the “impressionists.”

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Cassatt was born in western Pennsylvania in 1844. She first studied at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts but soon recognized the limitations of study in America, particularly for women, and decided to move to Europe. In Paris, Cassatt studied independently at the Louvre and Ecole des Beaux-Arts until she was forced to leave Paris in 1870 during the Franco-Prussian War. Cassatt spent two years traveling throughout Europe studying great painters and then in her thirtieth year, returned to Paris, established a studio and settled permanently.

 

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John Steinbeck and The Grapes of Wrath

Lead: In 1939 John Steinbeck published The Grapes of Wrath, perhaps the major American novel of the Great Depression. Its publication, however, was not without controversy.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: John Ernst Steinbeck was born in Salinas, California, a rural community 100 miles south of San Francisco. As a child he observed the hard life of itinerant and migrant farm workers and his boyhood home became the setting of much of his work. Beginning in 1935 with Tortilla Flat, In Dubious Battle, and Of Mice and Men, Steinbeck proved himself an acute observer of social conflict and pain. Yet it was with The Grapes of Wrath that he reached the pinnacle of his literary craft. Much of the material in the novel came from a series of investigative articles the author wrote for the San Francisco News on the plight of the “Oakies,” emigrants from the mid-west dust bowl – Oklahoma, Missouri, Kansas. In The Grapes of Wrath Steinbeck wove an elegant, semi-documentary narrative telling the story of the Joads, a 1930s Depression era farm family from Oklahoma. Seeking a better life, they had migrated to California only to find themselves caught in the same cycle of poverty and hopelessness they had left behind. The struggles and hardships of the working poor it seemed are rarely relieved by a change in geography.

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Bonnie and Clyde II

Lead: On May 23, 1934, the law finally caught Bonnie Parker and Clyde Barrow. The long ride and the acclaim came to an end.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: At the time of their deaths, the pair, known popularly as “Bonnie and Clyde,” were a legend in the depression era. Americans were appalled, yet fascinated by the crime spree, the narrow escapes, and the embarrassment the two were causing the law enforcement establishment. For over two years. Bonnie even sent terrible poems and tacky pictures to the press. Many were actually published in national newspapers, thus creating a pair of celebrity outlaws.

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