William Jennings Bryan and Cross of Gold II

Lead: Embittered by what he considered lack of recognition of his clearly superior leadership and bravery in battle, Benedict Arnold embarked on a course that made him the most famous traitor in American history.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: In the fall of 1777, Connecticut native Benedict Arnold was recuperating from a serious leg injury received at the Battle of Saratoga. In that most decisive American victory in the Revolution, Arnold’s leadership had been critical, but his commander Horatio Gates and the Continental Congress were tardy in according him proper recognition. This was not the first time Arnold had felt passed over for promotion and slighted by his superiors. Nevertheless, he had earned the great admiration of George Washington and eventually Congress recognized him for his role at Saratoga and restored his rank.

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William Jennings Bryan and Cross of Gold I

Lead: During the election of 1896 American voters just about lost control of themselves, all over the question of money.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: In 1893 the US sank into the worst financial depression the nation had yet experienced. Banks failed, farmers lost their holdings, and President Grover Cleveland, just beginning his second non-consecutive term, saw his long held dreams of reform shattered by the stricken economy. All his efforts to revive business and lift the national spirit came to grief and by 1896, Cleveland was even rejected for his party’s nomination. Instead, the Democrats chose a champion of free silver, a little-known congressman from Nebraska. He won by getting out in front of a tidal wave.

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Haynes-Webster Debate I

Lead: The argument over tariffs led to the Hayne-Webster debate.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Throughout U.S. history there has been a running dispute over trade. Competing regions and political parties have tried to use the taxing power of the federal government, which alone can place a tax on imported goods, to give them an advantage. In the 1800s Northern states were often in favor of high tariffs on imported goods, particularly from England, because a big tax on imports meant they would cost a lot more than items made in the USA, thus protecting American infant industry. The South with very little manufacturing, wanted the lowest possible tariff so that when southerners went overseas to sell their cotton, tobacco and grain they would not face high import tariffs imposed by foreign governments in retaliation for high U.S. tariffs. Each region was out for its own best interest. In 1828 Congress passed the so-called "Tariff of Abominations." It protected northern manufacturers, but was bad for the south.