Frederick Douglass II

Lead: Born a slave, Frederick Douglass became one of the most articulate spokesmen for abolition in the pre-Civil War era.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: After escaping from slavery as a teenager, Douglass began to speak to church audiences throughout the North about the horrors of slavery. "I've come to tell you about slavery. Other abolitionists can tell you something about slavery; they cannot refer you to a back covered with scars." William Lloyd Garrison, the crusading newspaper editor, hired Douglass as a lecturer and audiences of whites flocked to hear his eloquent and compelling denunciation of America's peculiar institution. So effective was Douglass on the speaking circuit that his handlers began to fear attempts to recapture him and take him back South. Therefore, they sent him on a two-year European tour. He returned after twenty-one months, an international celebrity.

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Frederic Douglass I

Lead: "All the other speakers seemed tame after Frederick Douglass. He stood there like an African Prince, majestic in his wrath."Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Elizabeth Cady Stanton knew her activists. It was an age of moral agitation and she would go on to great fame at the side of Susan B. Anthony in the service of women's rights. That day in the mid-1800s when Frederick Douglass spoke to an antislavery meeting in Boston, Stanton was as moved as the rest at the sound of his voice and the moral imperative of his message.

Douglass was an escaped slave. Raised by his grandmother on a Chesapeake Bay plantation, at the age of six he began his work under Captain Aaron Anthony, the white farm manager and, so some of the slaves said, Frederick's father. In later years, he would make vivid to audiences throughout the North the picture of life as a slave.

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Last Full Measure – The Golden Thirteen

Lead: For 400 years service men and women have fought to carve out and defend freedom and the civilization we know as America. This series on A Moment in Time is devoted to the memory of those warriors, whose sacrifice gave, in the words of Lincoln at Gettysburg, the last full measure.

Content: Despite its long history of racial accommodation, usually born of necessity since it was always having difficulty recruiting sufficient numbers of sailors, by the early twentieth century the U.S. Navy was aping the Jim Crow prejudice of the rest of American society. That began to change for good during World War II with the patriotic torrent of negro recruits after Pearl Harbor and finally with the commissioning in June 1944 of the Golden Thirteen, the first black officers in Navy history.

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George Washington Carver Part II

Lead: In 1896 agricultural scientist George Washington Carver received a unique invitation. It came from American educator Booker T. Washington.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: At this time George Washington Carver had just been appointed to the faculty of Iowa State College – the school’s first African American faculty member. Carver already had a national reputation in the field of agricultural research. Washington asked Carver to come to Alabama to create the agriculture program at Tuskegee Institute. “I cannot offer you money, position or fame. The first two you have… These… I ask you to give up. I offer you in their place: work—hard, hard work, the task of bringing a people from degradation, poverty, and waste…. Your department exits only on paper and your laboratory will have to be in your head.” Carver spent the rest of his life at Tuskegee.

 

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George Washington Carver Part I

Lead: George Washington Carver, a child born into slavery in 1864, would become one of the most renowned and successful of the world’s agricultural scientists.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: George Washington Carver was born to slave parents during the Civil War in Diamond Grove, a small town in southwest Missouri. His birthplace boiled throughout the war in a running conflict between free soil advocates and slaveholders. Carver’s father died accidentally shortly before his birth. Cast adrift and vulnerable, the boy and his mother were kidnapped by slave raiders. Carver was sick with whooping cough and was ransomed by his owners for a horse valued at three hundred dollars. Carver’s mother was never seen again. After emancipation, the orphaned Carver and his brother were taken in by their former owners, Moses and Susan Carver, a kind, childless German couple, who raised them as their own.

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Buffalo Soldiers II (African American Soldiers after the Civil War)

Lead: During the Indian wars, the Buffalo Soldiers, units made up of African Americans, served with great distinction.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Of the Native American clans who inhabited the West during the white settlement of the frontier, none were more resistant than the Apache. Unlike northern plains Indians, Sioux, Cheyenne, or Commanche, who fought mostly to keep miners, ranchers and hunters off their reserved territory, the Apache had lived for centuries alongside Spanish and then Mexican villages, sometimes attacking, sometimes trading with their white neighbors. They were consummate mountain guerrilla warriors, able to spring from ambushes with deadly effect and then cleverly elude their pursuers.

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Buffalo Soldiers I (African American Soldiers after the Civil War)

Lead: Following the Civil War, U.S. Army regiments made up of African American soldiers proved themselves among the most efficient and professional fighting men in the Indian Wars.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: During the Civil War over 180,000 blacks served in volunteer regiments fighting with the U.S. Army. They filled out units and even comprised one entire corps, the 25th, which helped occupy Richmond in the closing days of the war. Despite valiant and faithful service in the face of great danger, no African American troops were allowed to serve in regular army units. That all changed in the summer of 1866 when four infantry and two cavalry regiments were created by Congress to be made up exclusively of black enlisted men. Most of their service was on the frontier where Indian opponents nicknamed them Buffalo Soldiers.

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Garrett Augustus Morgan, Inventor

Lead: Garrett Augustus Morgan excelled in creativity and public service. He invented the predecessor of one of the most familiar sights in the world, the stoplight.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Garrett Morgan was born in Paris, Kentucky in 1877. His parents had been slaves and raised him on a farm. He received a limited formal schooling but was mostly self-educated.

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