A House Divided: (32) Collapse of the Whig Party – III

Lead:  One hundred and fifty years ago the Republic was facing its greatest crisis. This continuing series examines the American Civil War. It is A House Divided.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: By the end of the 1830s no significant subject in American political life could be discussed without reference to the enormous social, economic and moral issue of slavery. Americans were losing control of their ability to have a rational conversation. No national discussion was possible without dragging in the way in which it would affect the progress, expansion, restriction, or destruction of slavery. Whether it was tariffs, internal improvements, foreign affairs, economics, public education western expansion, the Transcontinental Railroad, the War in Mexico, all were affected by this question. Most American’s opinion on one issue was shaded by their opinion on The Issue.  

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A House Divided: (31) Collapse of the Whig Party – II

Lead:  One hundred and fifty years ago the Republic was facing its greatest crisis. This continuing series examines the American Civil War. It is A House Divided.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: The term “whig” comes out of English political history and is derived from the Scottish word “whiggamor” or cattle driver. It was a term of abuse and derision directed against Scottish Covenanter Presbyterian opponents of King Charles I. It came into wide use in the “Exclusion Crisis” of the 1680s and was applied to those who wished to exclude from the English throne, James, Duke of York, the brother of King Charles II, because James was a Roman Catholic.

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A House Divided: (30) Collapse of the Whig Party – I

Lead:  One hundred and fifty years ago the Republic was facing its greatest crisis. This continuing series examines the American Civil War. It is A House Divided.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: The founders of the United States felt that political parties were abhorrent. George Washington feared partisanship would lead to division and political gridlock though many in his administration identified themselves as members of the Federalist Party. In The Federalist Papers Alexander Hamilton and James Madison warned against the dangers of factional politics, yet Hamilton became the quintessential Federalist and Madison soon identified himself before and after the White House with Thomas Jefferson’s Democratic-Republican Party. For all these early warnings, Americans, as did their leaders, quickly divided into political factions.

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Wheelchair Inspiration – National Veterans Wheelchair Games

Lead: America’s veterans have often paid a terrible lingering physical and mental price for their service. The National Veterans Wheelchair Games helps many rise above their suffering.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: After World War II, many surviving servicemen came home severely handicapped. The loss of limbs and other types of physical incapacity compounded the normal struggle in readjusting to civilian pursuits. Through the G.I. Bill many went on to complete college, but the nation also provided ongoing rehabilitative services to terribly wounded veterans.

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A House Divided: (29) Uncle Tom’s Cabin – II

Lead:  One hundred and fifty years ago the Republic was facing its greatest crisis. This continuing series examines the American Civil War. It is A House Divided.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Uncle Tom’s Cabin sold millions of copies, North and South, and around the world. It drew upon Harriet Beecher Stowe’s personal experience with escapees while living in Ohio but also the slave narrative of Josiah Henson. It was clearly a work of fiction, but the author had a knack of advancing a compelling storyline and the ability to make her characters either winsome and appealing, such as the Christ-figure Uncle Tom or utterly loathsome such as the transplanted Yankee Louisiana overseer, Simon Legree.

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A House Divided (28) Uncle Tom’s Cabin – I

Lead:  One hundred and fifty years ago the Republic was facing its greatest crisis. This continuing series examines the American Civil War. It is A House Divided.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: In the 1850s, there was much conservative anti-Negro sentiment in the North. Illinois, Iowa and Indiana went so far as to pass sweeping laws preventing immigration by any blacks, slave or free. This was in part designed to assure the south by walling off those states as potential sanctuaries to fleeing slaves, but it also reflected the inherent racism of most Northerners in this period. Then this opinion began to shift. One important factor in the transformation of Yankee feelings toward negroes and slavery in general was the publication of Harriet Beecher Stowe’s Uncle Tom’s Cabin or Life Among the Lowly.

Transistor Radio

Lead: In 1954 Texas Instruments and its partner released for the holiday shopping season a remarkable new product which transformed entertainment and pointed to the electronic future: the transistor radio.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Just six years earlier, Bell Labs scientists had announced the invention of a primitive replacement for the vacuum tube. The glass enclosed tubes, invented in 1907 propelled the electronic world forward and made possible amplification, radio and long distance telephony, but tubes were slow, hot, bulky, and short-lived. The replacement was called a transistor or “transfer resistor.” It used the element germanium (and later silicon) covered on both sides with another element to create a tiny alternative to the vacuum tube which could act as an amplifier or a on/off switch.

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A House Divided (26): Slave Fugitives – Shadrach – II

Lead: One hundred and fifty years ago the Republic was facing its greatest crisis. This continuing series examines the American Civil War. It is "A House Divided."

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: In the 1850s Southerners, aided by the Federal government, became more aggressive in their quite legal pursuit of escaped slave property under the Fugitive Slave Law. Northern confrontation became more pronounced. Nowhere was this opposition more intense than Massachusetts. James B. McPherson called Boston, “the cockpit of this new revolution,” of resistance. In early 1851 a freshly escaped black waiter, self-renamed Shadrach for protection, was grabbed by agents in a Boston coffeehouse.

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