American Revolution: Letters from a Pennsylvania Farmer II

Lead: In the 1700s the United States broke from England. No colony in history had done that before. This series examines America’s Revolution.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

Content: In his long political career, Philadelphia lawyer and Delaware planter John Dickinson demonstrated a consistent moderation that often spoke to the heart of American popular sentiment which often reflected fatigue in the long decades of revolutionary upheaval, dispute and war. He drafted the ultimately ineffective Articles of Confederation (1776) and then joined in calls for a stronger central government, represented Delaware at the Constitutional Convention in 1787, and then worked for the passage of the Constitution. In the debates on independence he held out the hope for reconciliation with Great Britain and refused to sign the Declaration, but he was not a coward. He became the only founding father to manumit or free his slaves in the years between 1776 and 1787, a dangerous and potentially destructive act of moral and political courage.

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American Revolution: Letters from a Pennsylvania Farmer I

Lead: In the 1700s the United States broke from England. No colony in history had done that before. This series examines America’s Revolution.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

Content: In many ways the Stamp Act crisis of 1765-1766 was exhausting for Americans. The riots, petitions, newspaper arguments, endless debate, and economic dislocation caused by the drop-off in trade was bad enough. Even worse were the peculiar and uncomfortable emotions generated by this new and disquieting estrangement from Britain. This negative political energy produced a sense of confusion and weariness. And when Parliament proved its determination to force its will on the issue of taxation by passing a new round of import duties, the Townshend Acts, Americans were slow in reacting. There seemed to be a genuine doubt in some circles as to whether these taxes were in technical violation of the principle that had aroused such resentment and opposition during the previous year. Clearly many Americans were tired of the conflict and wished it to go away. Into this uncertainty stepped a heretofore unknown voice, Philadelphia lawyer, John Dickinson.

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Edgar Allan Poe

Lead: After a life of brilliant dissipation Edgar Allan Poe, whose lyrical musings delved deep into the dark precincts of the soul, died on October 7, 1849.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: After a classical education in Europe, further stumbling attempts at Virginia and West Point came to grief. Gambling and especially drink were the scourge of Poe's life. Despite his inner struggles and unrealized potential, Poe's intellectual radiance and unique ability to describe the fears and desires of the human condition could not but break through. Living the life of the gypsy author he wandered the East Coast seeking patrons and work, all the while churning out a prodigious and increasingly popular collection of detective stories, poems, narratives, stories of supernatural horror, dark journeys of inner terror that all too often seemed autobiographical.

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Battle of the Java Sea

Lead: Melancholy gripped the Allies in December, 1941. Japanese forces were everywhere victorious in Southeast Asia. It was time to take a stand.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Thailand, Malaya, Wake Island, Hong Kong, Manila, each were attacked by the Japanese and each fell just as quickly. On the 3rd of January, Churchill and Roosevelt formed a joint command with the Dutch and Australians, the purpose of which was to slow down the Japanese assault. The aim was to stop the enemy at the so-called Malay Barrier, an imaginary line stretching from Singapore at the base of the Malayan Peninsula down along the archipelago that is today known as Indonesia to the west coast of New Guinea.

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GI Bill of Rights

Lead: Originally conceived as a way of keeping unemployed ex-servicemen off the streets, the GI Bill transformed the campuses of American colleges.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Fearful that returning veterans would not be able to find jobs after World War II, Congress passed the Servicemen's Readjustment Act of 1944. The main feature of the bill was a provision for unemployment benefits at the rate of $20 per week for a year. Almost as an afterthought, the bill's sponsors tossed in a section guaranteeing any qualified veteran the chance to attend college for 48 months, at least in part, at government expense.

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Disputed Election of 1876 III

Lead: The fix was in. A deal with Southern democrats in 1876 made Rutherford B. Hayes President of the Unit-ed States.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: In the election of 1876, Sam Tilden, the New York Democrat was ahead in the popular vote and only one vote shy in the Electoral College. When the College met after the election, the votes of three Southern states were in dispute. To win, Hayes, the Republican candidate, needed all those Southern votes.

Disputed Election of 1876 II

Faced with a deadlocked election in 1876, Congress began to negotiate.

Intro.: "A Moment in Time" with Dan Roberts.

Content: In 1876 the Democrat, Samuel J. Tilden, won the popular vote, 250,000, and had 184 votes in the Elec-toral College, one vote shy of election. Tilden's opponent, Governor Rutherford B. Hayes of Ohio, was far behind at 165 votes and needed all votes of three disputed Southern states to win. All three, Louisiana, South Carolina, and Florida, were controlled by Republicans but they were accusing local Democrats of intimidating Blacks and thus preventing them from voting. Actually, both sides were guilty of fraud. In Louisiana, the members of the electoral commission were all Re-publicans but the chairman, J. Madison Wells offered Louisiana's votes to the highest bidder. Tilden's nephew William Pelton, the acting secretary of the Democratic National Committee, offered Wells $200,000 but the money got there too late and Wells was forced to accept a lesser offer from the Republicans.

Disputed Election of 1876 I

Lead: The Presidential Election in 1876 ended in deadlock. Rutherford B. Hayes, the Republican Governor of Ohio, won, but not without some highly questionable deals on both sides.

Intro.: "A Moment in Time" with Dan Roberts.

Content: After fifteen years of war and Reconstruction and two terms of corrupt politics under Republican President Ulysses S. Grant, the electorate was toying with the idea of returning the Democratic Party to the White House. The Democrats already controlled the House of Representatives and nominated the reform-minded Governor of New York, Samuel J. Tilden.