Coptic Christianity II

Lead: It was not easy, but in the years following the birth of Islam, Coptic Christianity was able to coexist in Egypt alongside its rival religion near the heart of Islamic culture.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: In the seventh century CE, not too many years after the hijira of Mohammed, Arabs invaded Egypt. For several centuries, Coptic Christians lived under various Muslim regimes, sometimes protected, sometimes persecuted, sometimes under onerous conditions, but able to survive and conduct worship. There were taxes and restrictions and the inevitable pressure to convert to Islam, but Muslim scholars respected Coptic erudition and permitted a certain flowering and preservation of this brand of Christianity.

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Coptic Christianity I

Lead: The establishment of Christianity in Egypt was early and reflected the richness of the Alexandrian Jewish community from which it probably emerged. It has continued ever since.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Coptic Christianity, the name from a European corruption of the Arabic “kibt,” itself derived from the Greek, “aiguptioi” or Egyptians, was probably in place by the end of the first century. It is said that the evangelist Mark brought the Gospel to Alexandria and preached to the large, educated Jewish community there, found a significant response, and was martyred for his efforts. There was a Catechetical School in Alexandria by 200 C.E. and in the following century, the Coptic Church was established.

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A House Divided: Democratic Convention in Charleston 1860 II

Lead:  One hundred and fifty years ago the Republic was facing its greatest crisis. This continuing series examines the American Civil War. It is A House Divided.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: On April 23, 1860, state delegations assembled in Charleston, South Carolina, for the Democratic Party convention. As the convention began, there was a rumor that some southern Democratic delegates were planning a walk out if the party did not endorse a slave code: federal protection for slavery in the western territories. This would force slavery into all parts of the country.

A House Divided: Democratic Convention in Charleston 1860 I

Lead:  One hundred and fifty years ago the Republic was facing its greatest crisis. This continuing series examines the American Civil War. It is A House Divided.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: One of the defining events leading up to the Civil War was the Democratic National Convention in Charleston, South Carolina. Charleston, a major port city on the Atlantic coast, had a population of over 40,000 people, one of the largest southern cities. With deep divisions in the party, particularly over the issue of slavery, front runner Illinois Senator Stephen Douglas, regarded as moderate on the issue of slavery, knew he had to somehow placate the southern faction, who were strongly insisting on a pro-slavery plank in the party platform. 

Mexico: The Aztecs: Conquered by the Spanish

Lead:  In just two years, the Spanish Conquistadors, led by Hernan Cortez, were able to almost completely destroy the Aztecs, one of the most advanced indigenous empires of the Americas. Beware Spaniards bearing disease.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: During the late fifteenth century, the Spanish began to occupy the Caribbean, and in 1519, with relatively few resources, invaded present day Mexico and conquered one of the most war-like civilizations in the Americas. In February of that year, Cortez and approximately five hundred soldiers arrived on the Mexican coast. Cortez either burned or scuttled his ships to discourage his already restless company from any thoughts of turning back. They brought with them things Native Americans had never seen before: guns, cannon and between ten and twenty horses. With these weapons and horses, Cortez was able to instill fear in and defeat the indigenous armies.

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Mexico: The Aztecs: Religion and Culture

Lead:  In the early decades of the 1500s, Spanish explorers, Conquistadors, moved from the Caribbean coast in central Mexico. There they encountered the Aztecs, a deeply religious people with a complex structure of rites and ceremonies.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: The Aztecs were one of most advanced civilizations in the Americas. When the Spanish made contact they were utterly amazed by the Aztecs’ high developmental level of math, astronomy, agriculture, and, in particular, architecture. Much of the architecture was related to religion. Aztecs believed the massive sculptures and towering temples were pleasing to the Gods and were a form of human respect and tribute.

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Mexico: The Aztecs: People and Civilization

Lead:  In the early sixteenth century, one of most advanced civilization in the Americas was at its height when it was abruptly invaded and conquered by the Spanish.        

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: When Spanish explorers, led by Hernan Cortes, landed in present day Mexico in 1519, the Aztec civilization and empire stretched from Central Mexico southward to present-day Guatemala.

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Time Capsule 1980: The Boycott of the Moscow Summer Olympics

Lead:  When the 1980 Olympic Summer Games were held in Moscow, over sixty nations were missing. The boycott was led by the United States as a protest over the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan.    

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: In December 1979 Soviet troops invaded Afghanistan to support and stabilize the communist regime, at that time facing growing resistance among the Afghan people. The locals responded to the invasion with an insurgent war in one of most rugged and harsh climates in the world.