A House Divided: (49) The Martyr of Harper’s Ferry – I

Lead:  One hundred and fifty years ago the Republic was facing its greatest crisis. This continuing series examines the American Civil War. It is A House Divided.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.


Content: He was a murderer whose grand scheme included a vast destruction of white southerners in a slave uprising, but in the white hot discourse that was the national conversation in America of the 1850s, he became for many opposed to slavery a martyr to the cause.

Golda Meir

Lead: One of Israel's strongest leaders was a little girl from Milwaukee, Goldie Mabovich.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Born in Kiev, Ukraine, Goldie emigrated with her family to Milwaukee in 1906. She attended the Teacher's Seminary but was soon attracted to politics and became a leader in Milwaukee's Labor Zionist Party. In 1921 with her husband Morris Myerson, she went to live in Palestine. For a time they tried the communal life of a kibbutz but finally abandoned it. Their two children were born in the early 1920's in Jerusalem while the couple scratched for a living, he as a carpenter, she as a washerwoman. The siren call of politics brought Goldie into the General Federation of Labor and during the 1930's, she rose in prominence and political position.

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Compromise of 1833 IV

Lead: Conflict over a protective tariff almost produced Civil War in the United States in 1833.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Angered over protective tariffs which benefited Northern industry and hurt Southern farmers, Southerners, led by United States Vice-President John C. Calhoun of South Carolina in the early 1830s, advocated nullification. If states were convinced the Federal government had passed laws that were unconstitutional, they could nullify them, declare them inoperative inside their state's boundaries.

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Compromise of 1833 III

Lead: The debate over a protective tariff nearly brought the United States to Civil War in 1833.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: In the late 1820s, Northern manufacturers wanted a high tariff to protect their businesses from foreign competition. Southern farmers despised protective tariffs. They wanted free trade to buy cheaper goods from Europe and to discourage other countries from imposing retaliatory tariffs which made it harder to sell Southern rice and cotton overseas.

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Compromise of 1833 II

Lead: In late 1832 the state of South Carolina declared that it had the right to nullify or ignore Federal law within its boundaries.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: At its heart, the U.S. Constitution was a compromise, more precisely, it was a series of compromises, between rural and urban areas, between small states and large ones, between those living on the frontier and maritime interests on the coast, between slaveholders and those opposed to this institution and embarrassed by its glaring violation of the nation's ideals.

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Compromise of 1833 I

Lead: There are several themes of conflict or faultlines that run through United States History. One of the most important is the tension between Federal and local government.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: After the failure of the first post-revolutionary experiment in government, the Articles of Confederation, it became clear to the founders that if the United States was to grow and prosper, the individual states must surrender a significant portion of their power to the national government. The Constitution and its first ten amendments, known as the Bill of Rights, gave certain responsibilities to the central regime among which were foreign policy, the declaration of war, and the federal judiciary. However, the Constitution specifically retained significant power in the hands of the states and also left many other questions to be decided in the future.

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Problem with Charles Lindbergh II

Lead: Charles Augustus Lindbergh, the Lone Eagle, inspired the world with his solo Atlantic flight in 1927. In the years leading up to World War II, he became a figure of great controversy.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Lindbergh was the son of a U.S. Congressman. He dropped out of college to pursue his love of the airplane. After his stunning flight he was nearly everyone's hero. An intensely shy man, after his marriage to Anne Morrow, he moved his family to rural New Jersey. Their son was kidnapped and murdered in the early 1930s. After the trial and execution of the killer, they tried again to escape the public eye, this time in Europe.

 

 

Problem with Charles Lindbergh I

Lead: After his solo flight in 1927, Charles Augustus Lindbergh was arguably the most famous man in the world.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Lindbergh spent his youth in Little Falls, Minnesota and in Washington where his father, for five terms, represented the sixth district of Minnesota in Congress. He tried college, but dropped out of Wisconsin after his sophomore year to pursue a growing fascination with aviation. Stunt flying in a World War I Curtiss Jenny through the south and Midwest was followed by army flying school and a service as airmail pilot between St. Louis and Chicago. During this period he convinced a group of St. Louis businessmen to back him in the competition for the $25,000 prize offered by French-American hotel owner Raymond Orteig for the first nonstop New York to Paris flight.