Settlement of Australia – I

Lead: With the loss of its North American colonies Great Britain had to find another place to send its convicts. It chose the uninhabited eastern region of New South Wales, destination: Botany Bay.

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

                Content: One of the important means by which England assisted in the development of America was a steady supply of convict labor in the 1600s and 1700s. For a fee, contractors would ship surplus convicts to employers in the colonies, particularly Georgia and Maryland. There they would augment the free and slave labor supply, work off their sentence and usually remain to bolster the population of the colonies. This so-called transportation trickled to a stop and died after 1776.

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Royal Navy Loses the Revolution – II

Lead: By failing to bottle up the French Navy British naval units faced an almost impossible task and may have given lost the American Revolution.

            Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

            Content: For nearly a century the key to Royal Navy success against France had been to confine the French Navy to home waters. This would strangle French commerce and expose France’s overseas colonial territories to capture. This had succeeded before and would again in the Napoleonic Wars, but during the American Revolution, strategic timidity and incompetence in the government of Lord North delayed the Royal Navy’s response to the threat and French naval units escaped into the Atlantic.  Britain never regained the initiative as the French captured British possessions in the Caribbean, assaulted British interests in the Far East, and harried British garrisons up and down the American coast.

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Royal Navy Loses the American Revolution – I

Lead: By changing its tactics, the handlers of the Royal Navy contributed a great deal to Britain loss of its colonies during the American Revolution. 

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts. 

                Content: The American Revolution was in constant doubt in the early years. Save a few tactical victories during 1776 and 1777, Continental forces reeled under powerful hammering from both British army and navy. With no need to watch their rear flank naval units were able to supply and support the regiments of General Sir Henry Clinton as they evacuated Boston, crushed George Washington’s dwindling forces in New York and captured Philadelphia. In the euphoria surrounding this string of victories, few noted this was a serious misuse of the Royal Navy, which should have been trying to seal up the porous colonial coastline and thus prevent vital supplies and munitions from reaching the rebels.

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The Great Wall of China – Part II

Lead: Much of the Great Wall of China, as it is known today, was constructed during the Ming Dynasty (1368-1644).

            Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

            Content: The Great Wall of China that we are familiar with today was built by hand during the Ming Dynasty beginning in the late 16th century. The longest structure ever built by mankind, The Great Wall is not actually a continuous structure but a network of walls and fortifications.

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The Great Wall of China – Part I

Lead: Considered to be one the greatest engineering and building feats of mankind, The Great Wall of China was designed to keep the barbarians out.

                 Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts. 

                Content: The Great Wall of China, a contemporary term for a system of defensive barriers to ward off invaders from the north, was built along the northern border of China between the east coast and north central China, covering a 1500 mile border. Including branches and the undulating paths that the walls follow along rivers, mountains and valleys, the total length of the walls is believed to be about 4,800 miles. Contrary to popular myth, the Great Wall of China is not a continuous wall but an amalgamation of walls and fortifications built and rebuilt by several dynasties over a period of 1300 years. The present wall was built chiefly by the Ming Dynasty, who ruled between A.D. 1368-1644.  The height of the wall ranges from 15 to 35 feet with a 13-foot roadway along the top.

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Daniel Boone – Part II

Lead: In 1775 frontiersman Daniel Boone established a wilderness road, which became the gateway to the west during the sixty years following the American Revolution. 

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts. 

                Content: Contrary to popular myth, Daniel Boone was not the first American pioneer to explore Kentucky. Boone, however, did establish a pathway through the Mountains that made possible increased settlement in the west. The Cumberland Gap is a natural pass in the Appalachian Mountains on the border of Virginia, Kentucky and Tennessee. At an elevation of 1600 feet, the cut was made by an ancient stream six hundred feet into the highlands. The pass, was discovered in 1750 by Dr. Thomas Walker, a Virginia agent for the British Loyal Land Company.  Dr. Walker simply followed a trail (called the Great Warrior’s Path) that the Native Americans had used for centuries. He named it for the son of King George III - the Duke of Cumberland.

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Daniel Boone – Part I

Lead: In 1734 Daniel Boone perhaps the most well known American pioneer was born near present day Reading, Pennsylvania. He was the sixth of eleven children.

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

                Content: The Boone family were hard-working Quaker farmers. Daniel grew up learning to hunt, trap and survive on the land – skills that would make him a consummate survivor on the American frontier. Like most pioneer children, he did not attend school but was taught to read and write by a family member in his case, an aunt. When Daniel was about sixteen, the Boones sold their farm in Pennsylvania and resettled in the Yadkin River Valley of North Carolina a journey that took the family over a year.

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The Bowery

                Lead: The Bowery, noted in legend and fact as a home, for New York’s alcoholics, prostitutes and the homeless, was originally Dutch colonial farmland.

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts. 

                Content: When the Dutch settled Manhattan in the 1600s the land that runs diagonally from present day Chatham Square to the crossing of Fourth Avenue and Eighth Street was an Indian Trail. It led from the main area of settlement to a group of agricultural tracts prominent among which was Governor Peter Stuyvesant’s bouwerij, the Dutch word for farm. By the early 1800s it had become a well-traveled thoroughfare and in 1807 was named the Bowery.

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