Azaria Chamberlain and Media Power – I

Lead: In the winter of 1980, nine-week-old Azaria Chamberlain disappeared from the family tent near Ayers Rock in central Australia. Her mother said, “The dingo’s got my baby.” Others were not so sure.

 

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

 

                Content: Ayers Rock, known to indigenous Australians as Uluru, is the world’s largest monolith, a single structure of course grained limestone, 318 meters above and 3.5 miles the below the desert floor near Alice Springs in Northern Territory of Australia. Depending on the hour and climatic conditions the rock can radiate spectacular variety of color. Thousands visit each year to examine its unique characteristics or to worship.

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The Gettysburg Address – Part II

Lead: On November 18, 1863, at the dedication of the National Cemetery in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, “appropriate remarks” Abraham Lincoln was asked to deliver are remembered as a masterful example of rhetorical English.

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

               

Content: The soldier’s national cemetery was dedicated four months following the bloodiest battle of the Civil War. Seventeen acres were purchased on Cemetery Ridge near the center of the Union line during the battle. Confederate soldiers were reburied on the battlefield and then permanently interred in southern cemeteries following the war.

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The Gettysburg Address – Part I

Lead: In July 1863, the bloody sacrifices at the Battle of Gettysburg inspired the idea for a national cemetery. Its dedication was the scene of an historic speech by the President of the United States.

 

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

 

                Content: When Union and Confederate armies marched away from the small Pennsylvania municipality of Gettysburg in July 1863, the town of 2,500 people was in shambles. Over the three days of fighting there were 51,000 casualties, the bloodiest battle of the American Civil War. Townspeople were left with the daunting task of caring for thousands of injured and dying soldiers and for the burial of 7,000 dead  left behind on the battlefield along with the carcasses of 5,000 horses.

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Japanese American Concentration Camps – II

Lead: During World War II the United States, incarcerated over 100,000 Japanese American citizens. Fear and political calculation combined to produce a constitutional and personal travesty.

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

                Content: The detention centers were Spartan and at first barely livable, but gradually conditions improved for these American citizens, men, women and children, who had been shipped from their homes on the Pacific coast to the ten inland concentration camps. In retrospect the entire evacuation was unnecessary, born of political calculation and fear. In the wake of Japan’s sudden attack on December 7th, there was an explosion of patriotic sentiment and anger against all things Japanese. Newspapers fed the feelings of hurt and betrayal with often inaccurate stories about possible Japanese American complicity in the assault. The U.S. military had been unprepared by the attack and was fearful of an invasion. The Western Defense Command demanded the removal of ethnic Japanese, despite their citizenship. Yet, there was no credible evidence that Japanese Americans had or would have helped in any invasion.

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Laura Ingalls Wilder

Lead: In 1930 Laura Ingalls Wilder began writing about her childlhood experiences on the American frontier. The result was classic literature read by young people and adults throughout the world.

                 Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

                 Content: The inspiration came from her daughter, Laura Lane, a San Francisco journalist. Then in her mid-sixties, Laura Wilder, writing on school tablets and using pencils, created eight loosely autobiographical novels, known collectively as the “Little House Books,” published between 1932 and 1943. They have been praised as vividly detailing frontier domestic life, seen through the eyes of a young girl.

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Social Security – III

Lead: Faced with burgeoning grass roots demands for social relief, the New Deal administration of Franklin Roosevelt circumvented radical demands with Social Security.

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

                Content: Following the stock market crash in late 1929 the economy of the United States contracted by almost 50%. Unemployment soared to unprecedented levels and radical demands for relief began to overwhelm the traditional American reluctance to provide or to go on welfare. In one of the most potent, the Townsend Clubs advocating the Townsend plan which would have provided a regularly monthly subsidy for all Americans over 60, had two million members. Congress began to feel the heat and react accordingly.

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Social Security – II

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Lead: During the Great Depression various attempts were made to address the question of widespread poverty, some serious, but some of them were outlandish political manipulation.

                 Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

                 Content: With the coming of industrial society, the growth of urban population, the shrinking of family size and the retreat of religious and fraternal organizations from active poor relief, people gradually began to turn to the state for assistance. Yet, there was powerful political and emotional resistance to state intervention. Many people felt that times would get better, that hard work and self-reliance were the solution to poverty. President Herbert Hoover suggested that voluntary partnerships of government, business and private giving would provide all the relief needed. As the economy worsened, however, demands for national social action began to drown out the reluctance born of religion, prejudice and corporate self-interest.

 

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Social Security – I

Lead: In 1935 the United States became the last major industrial nation to adopt a system of general social insurance. Today Social Security is a national success story, but it did not come easily into being.

            Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

            Content: One of the great universal human longings is for security. Over the centuries various schemes have arisen to address fears of economic deprivation, unemployment, illness, disability, death and old age. In Medieval Europe guilds, trade organizations, which regulated production and sales, also provided members relief in times of poverty, sickness or death. The Christian church, particularly the regular clergy, members of monastic orders, was an on-going source of relief for the poor and destitute.

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