Missouri Compromise – I

Lead: In 1818 the slave-holding territory of Missouri requested admission to the United States as a state. This application setting off a storm of controversy and rising sectionalism in the U.S. Congress.

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

                Content: When Congress considered Missouri’s petition for statehood, there were twenty-two states in the Union – eleven were slaveholding states and eleven were non-slaveholding states. Consequently, there was an even balance of power regarding over slavery in the United States Senate. With the admission of Missouri as a slaveholding state, the balance of power in the Senate would shift. Northerners  regarded the admission of Missouri as jeopardy their political interests.

Read more →

Maori v. European: Cultural Clash in New Zealand – II

Lead: With the arrival of Europeans in New Zealand the indigenous culture of the Maori faced a challenge which they were in the end unable to resist. 

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts. 

                Content: In December 1642 Dutch explorer Abel Tasman sailed into what became Golden Bay on the northern coast of New Zealand’s south island. He received a curious, but hostile reception as did British Captain James Cook a century later. Cook’s trip was for scientific exploration, he was commissioned to examine and classify new species of plants and animals, but his claim of the islands for Britain set the stage for the arrival of colonists, traders and missionaries during the following decades.

Read more →

Maori v. European: Cultural Clash in New Zealand – I

Lead: Inevitably, the ever-expanding European colonial enterprise discovered Zeelandia Nova, but when Dutch arrived in New Zealand in 1642 they found a well- established culture already there.   

                 Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts. 

                Content: New Zealand, rugged, rich, wildly beautiful, hidden behind a vast oceanic barrier, was the final large land mass colonized by the human race. It is estimated that not until about AD 800 did Polynesian explorers, probably manning large capacity outrigger canoes, find their way to the northern of New Zealand’s two major islands, so remote that it is 1000 miles southeast from the closest part of Australia. Their arrival was the culmination of one of humanity’s greatest colonial expansions. Out from the East Asian land mass into the southern Pacific archepelago these Austronesian-speaking colonists exploded. 2000 years before the Vikings ranged west to North America, Indonesia, New Guinea, Tonga, Fiji, Rarotonga, and Tahiti were prosperous outposts of this eastern expansion. Finally, wheeling southwest they came to New Zealand.

Read more →

Leadership: Juan Romagoza

Lead: Often social progress requires a leader forfeit personal safety and affluence, even place him or herself in harms way. Such was not the first choice of Juan Romagoza.

            Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

            Content: Usulu ‘tan a city of about 75,000 lies 55 miles east southeast of San Salvador, the capital of the central American nation of El Salvador. There Juan Romagoza grew to manhood in a family so spiritually rich that later he said that he only rarely noticed that he lived in abject poverty. There he fell under the influence of Father and then Bishop Oscar Romero. For a time, Romagoza considered the priesthood, but dropped out of seminary bitter at a God who would allow his nation to be racked with so much poverty and corruption, a place where right wing paramilitaries preserved the government and the rule of the landed aristocracy with torture and death.

Read more →

Leadership: Mother Jones – II

                Lead: Harded by famine, plague and fire, Mary Harris, Mother Jones became the champion of workers, especially working children in turn of the twentieth century America.

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

                Content: She lost her Irish home place to famine and was forced to emigrate, her husband and four children to yellow fever and her business to the Great Chicago Fire of 1871. This white haired, grandmotherly figure was one tough lady. Widowed and unemployed, she became involved in the radical wing of the labor movement. In 1903, when the textile workers of Philadelphia went out on strike for more pay and better working conditions, Mother Jones joined their efforts and with her sense of timing and public relations, gave visibility to the workers’ courage and determination.

Read more →

Leadership: Mother Jones

Lead:  The working children of nineteenth century America, many of whom were under the age of 12, often labored in appalling conditions. These children found a voice, it was that of Mother Jones.  

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts. 

                Content: During the 1900s in its swift expansion, American industry often created dreadful working conditions. None suffered more than children sent by their parents into loud, steam-heated, disease ridden factories making pennies a day to supplement meager family earnings. Mill owners and parents alike easily circumvented laws prohibiting child labor. In late spring 1903, 100,000 workers of the 600 mills in Philadelphia’s Kensington district struck demanding higher wages and better working conditions. 16,000 of the strikers were children under the age of 16. They soon found a champion.           

Read more →

Leadership: Candy Lightner – the MADD Queen – II

Lead: Empowered by the death of her daughter at the hands of a previously convicted drunk driver, Candy Lightner formed Mothers Against Drunk Driving. She was its founding force, but was later forced out. 

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts. 

                Content: It is often the case that social and political phenomenon require a human catalyst, a single individual who inspires trust, embodies the aspirations of the movement. Candy Lightner provided leadership for those angered by the carnage inflicted by drunk drivers. While drunk driving had been a persistent social problem for decades, not until the late 1970s did a consensus form demanding something be done to remove this scourge from American highways. The death of Cari Lightner compelled her mother into the world of public policy. 

Read more →

Hitler’s Generals Conspire – II

Lead: Whether through timidity or misfortune the Generals who despised and conspired against Hitler lost the chance to stop him before war. Doggedly they kept it up.

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts. 

                Content: The conspiracy against Hitler within the ranks of the German army is one of the Third Reich’s most intriguing stories. Led by Ludwig Beck, former Army Chief of Staff, the plotters were among the most prominent general officers in the German military hierarchy.  Hitler’s initial successes after 1939 put them on the defensive, but the company increased and as the war turned against Germany, each new defeat, particularly that at Stalingrad, heightened their determination to be rid of the gutter snipe before his megalomania brought Germany to ruin. Their motives, often rooted in social disdain rather than moral revulsion, varied from person to person. Beck feared Hitler’s geopolitical recklessness. Admiral Canaris hated Hitler, Himmler and the entire Nazi movement as a political phenomenon. Von Stauffenberg was horrified by Nazi cruelty to slavs and Jews in a kind of upper class superiority. General Tresckow believed even a failed attempt was a worthy sign that at least some in Germany had not abandoned decency. Alas, all their attempts failed either through poor planning or faulty equipment. The little corporal’s luck never seemed to run out.

Read more →