Medieval Women: Christine de Pizan – Part II

Lead: Out of 14th century has emerged one of the notable voices articulating an early vision of full participation in the social and political life for women, the proto-feminist Christine de Pizan

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts. 

                Content: Medieval author Christine de Pizan is considered by many to be the first feminist voice. She lived at a time when women had limited legal rights and were considered the property of a father or husband. She was born in Venice, Italy, in 1364. Christine’s father, Tomasso de Pizzano, was a well-respected physician and astrologer. When she was five years old her father accepted a position as court astrologer and secretary to King Charles V of France. Growing up at the French Court, with her father’s approval and encouragement, the studious and bright Christine received an excellent education studying literature, history, religion and classical languages.

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Medieval Women – I

Lead: The vision of medieval women that has emerged in the popular imagination is that of idealized caricature, instead they were full participants in life, good and bad

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

                Content: Thomas Hobbes, writing in the seventeenth century, wrote that the lot of man was, “solitary, poor, nasty, brutish and short.” His reference was much broader than any single epoch, but surely the medieval period in Europe was, for many of its inhabitants, little better than that. Yet, the era had periods of brilliant accomplishment, when men and women rose above their straightened circumstances to achieve greatness. For the most part, however, life was a struggle against poverty and disease, corruption, lawlessness and early death.

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Leadership: The Pyrrhic Leadership of Sitting Bull

Lead: For a brilliant moment on that afternoon late June 1876, it seemed that he was right. Custer was dead and all his men with him, but like King Pyrrhus against the Romans before him, Sitting Bull found his victory of too great a cost.

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

                Content: Sitting Bull once said to General Miles, “….God Almighty made me an Indian, but he didn’t make me an agency Indian, and I don’t intend to be one,”

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Ned Kelly: Australia’s Anti-Hero

Lead: Because of its origins as a penal colony, the dumping ground for Britain’s criminal class in the early nineteenth century, Australia’s citizens have a strong trace of scorn for overblown authority. No better example - the popularity of Ned Kelly. 

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

                Content: Edward “Ned” Kelly’s father was a convict, shipped to Australia after being arrested in Ireland for stealing two pigs. The boy’s was not an easy childhood, but was probably raised in an environment hostile to that colonial enterprise founded on transportation and convict labor. After his father’s sudden death when Ned was 14 his mother moved her family to the Glenrowan region of northeast Victoria. As the oldest of seven children he had to drop out of school to help support the struggling family and, not surprisingly, about that time he began to get into trouble with the police. Over the years he was arrested and served time for stealing livestock, assault and a stream of general trouble-making.

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Battle of Hastings – III

Lead: Having turned aside one invasion, Norsemen allied with his brother, Harold, King of England, received word that his archenemy, William, Duke of Normandy had landed near Hastings.

                 Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

                Content: Before the battle, the two antagonists exchanged envoys and it probably was at that time that Harold learned of Pope Alexander’s decision against his claim to the throne along with the presumed threat of excommunication and interdict. Though the story is told by his detractors, more than one chronicler has said that he was visibly shaken at the time and after a period of agonizing silence he ordered his troops, already exhausted by their fighting in the north, into a forced march. He drew them up on a bluff commanding a small valley across the coastal road running out of Hastings to London. On Saturday, October 14, 1066 the two armies fought from dawn to dusk. In the end, the exhausted English foot-soldiers gave way under repeated assaults from mounted Norman knights. Harold was probably first blinded by a stray arrow and then, in the gathering darkness, hacked apart on the field by Norman knights. Leaderless, after a brief heroic stand at the crossroads, the Saxon army fled into the forest and melted away.

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Leadership: Oliver Hill – II

Lead: Some civil rights leaders became masters of the sound bite, making their contribution in public protest. Not so Oliver Hill. He chose legal weapons to take apart the institutions of white supremacy.               

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.              

Content: Leadership is not always a visible, public exercise. In the twentieth century civil rights movement a variety of stratagem was applied. Some went for public demonstrations. Oliver Hill, following the lifelong approach of his mentor at Howard University Law, Dean Charles Hamilton Huston, went after the legal apparatus that sustained segregation. From their Richmond law firm Hill and his associates litigated scores of cases during the 1950s and 1960s, never losing one.

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Leadership: Oliver Hill – I

Lead: In the leadership ranks of the twentieth century civil rights movement, few equal the contribution of Oliver Hill. His quiet, unobtrusive legal and personal tenacity helped break the back of massive resistance.

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts. 

                Content: Oliver Hill was born in 1907 and grew up in Richmond and Roanoke Virginia and in Washington, D.C. He attended Howard University and Howard Law School where he and other students, including his classmate and friend, future Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall, came under the pervasive influence of Dean Charles Hamilton Huston. Huston imparted to his students his lifelong dream of taking apart, root and branch, the legal apparatus of discrimination against blacks in twentieth century America.

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Missouri Compromise – II

Lead: By 1820 the American sectional crisis over the issue of slavery in territories applying for statehood was temporarily solved by the Missouri Compromise.

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

                Content: By 1820 the debate over slavery focused upon the technical question on whether slavery could be restricted in territories applying for statehood. Southerners insisted on no federal restrictions. Northerners wanted to put a block on the spread of slavery into the states carved out of the Louisiana Purchase.

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