Leadership: Jo Ann Gibson Robinson

Lead: Some of the most powerful leaders can be those who are almost invisible. Consider the self-effacing and gentle leadership of Jo Ann Gibson Robinson.       

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

                Content: It is difficult to remember, at the dawn of the twenty-first century, what it was like to be black in the south just a few decades ago - separate accommodations, separate, but unequal schools, separate public services. One of the singular milestones on the hard road to full-citizenship for African Americans was the Montgomery, Alabama Bus Boycott. There, in the mid-1950s, a group of brave, visionary women, led the black community to initial defiance and then stepped aside to let the natural leaders take the lead. They demonstrated the essence of invisible leadership. Scholars Georgia Sorenson and Gill Hickman define invisible leadership as quiet, unobtrusive influence motivated less by self-interest than commitment to a common purpose.

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Texas and the Civil War – Part II

Lead: Although there were few military engagements in Texas during the War Between the States, thousands of Texans went east into the fighting and Texas was the scene of the last battle.

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

                Content: Texas joined the Confederacy in March 1861 and supplied the Confederacy with as many as 90,000 soldiers during the four years of conflict. Although several Texas regiments were deployed east of the Mississippi, about two-thirds in the west and the southwest defending Union attempts at invasion, being particularly vigilant on ports and borders, through which supplies flowed to support the Confederate war effort. Troops also warded off Indian and Mexican attacks and  other regiments were sent west to expand the Confederacy into Arizona and New Mexico.

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Texas in the Civil War – Part I

Lead: On January 28, 1861, the state of Texas seceded from the Union. It  and joined the Confederacy the following March, but this action was not universally popular. Even Sam Houston was opposed.

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

                Content: Immediately following the election of Abraham Lincoln in November of 1860, seven states from the Deep South left, viewing Lincoln’s election as a threat to  slavery and the spread of slavery to the western territories. After the fall of Fort Sumter in April four more states departed, those in the upper south, bringing the Confederate total to eleven.

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Battle of Saratoga – Part II

Lead: On September 19, 1777, the Battle of Saratoga, a victory for the American rebels, was not only a turning point in the Revolution, but also transformed the diplomatic landscape.

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts. 

                Content: In the summer of 1777, British forces, led by General John Burgoyne, marched southward from Quebec along the Hudson River seeking to capture Albany, New York, seize control of the Hudson River, and thereby cut New England from the south. It was bold move.

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Battle of Saratoga – I

Lead: In the summer of 1777, an army led by British General John Burgoyne, marched south from Quebec to end the rebel  on in the colonies. Instead it ended in disaster for the British and was perhaps the turning point of the Revolution.

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

                Content: In the summer of 1777 the British Army planned a military campaign that, if successful, would result in the occupation of Albany, New York, and control of the Hudson River – thereby separating New England from the southern colonies – and forcing an end to the rebellion. 

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Leadership: Pericles and the Maturing of Athenian Democracy – II

Lead: Democracy is a rare thing. Even in ancient Athens, democrats constantly struggled to fend off tyrants and wealthy oligarchs seeking to terminate the rule of the people. One prominent ally of democracy in that struggle was the rhetorical genius of Pericles. 

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts. 

                Content: The Athenian democratic constitution was never really secure. After the legislator Solon opened the ranks of citizenship and participation by rich and poor alike, his work was overthrown in 560 not to be revived until Cleisthenes reversed the tyranny in 508 and 507. His constitution but even that retained a large measure of aristocratic rule. Gradually, however, reforms chipped away at the power of the oligarchs and more and more of Athens citizens gained economic rights and those of participation in the ____, the Assembly of the People.

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Leadership: Pericles and the Maturing of Athenian Democracy – I

Lead: In the relatively short history of human civilization, democracy has only rarely emerged a way of doing public business. In ancient Greece, democracy emerged through the efforts of a group of aristocrats. 

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts. 

                Content: Democracy, the rule of the people is a rare and precious thing. Since the beginning of human government most people have been told how to live by monarchs, oligarchs or dictators. The human will to power is a commanding impulse and most leaders have aspired to power as absolute as they could achieve. In ancient Greece, from about 620 BC for more than two centuries, in fits and starts, the Greek city-state of Athens, gradually established the rule of the people. This change came as a result of the efforts of several important aristocrats, acting against their class and position society and in the name of the public good, help create an experiment in self-rule that would not be repeated for centuries.

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Leadership: Wilma Mankiller

Lead: Leadership often comes from the most unlikely persons. In 1985 Wilma Mankiller became the first female chief of a major Indian tribe. Her leadership style and methods were quiet but very effective.

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

                Content: Mankiller was one of eleven children born in Tahlequah, Oklahoma in 1945. She was named for a Cherokee ancestor, a high-ranking warrior of ancient lineage. Wilma grew up in rural, impoverished Mankiller Flats on land given to her paternal grandfather in 1907 when Oklahoma achieved statehood. In the mid-1950s drought and the attending failure of their farm forced the family to move to San Francisco as part of the Bureau of Indian Affairs Relocation Program. This program was established to help resettle poor rural Native Americans in an urban setting.

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