John Winthrop and the Massachusetts Bay Colony I

Lead: During the 1630s English Puritans by the thousands left their homeland to build a new home in Massachusetts. Many were inspired by their leader, John Winthrop.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Though the name puritan originated as a disparaging nickname in the complaints of those who opposed them, the faction that came to be known as Puritans were loyal members of the Church of England who believed that the Reformation did not go far enough and wished to "purify" that communion of any remaining Catholic tendencies in theology, liturgy, and church government. Unlike the Pilgrims, who were separatists, the Puritans did not wish to break away from the national church but agitated for change from within.

John Winthrop and the Massachusetts Bay Colony II

Lead: During the 1630s, John Winthrop, governor of the Massachusetts Bay Colony, established strict order in Boston and in surrounding settlements, but the godly order he organized was soon under challenge.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Winthrop was the first colonial governor of Massachusetts and is credited with successfully leading the colony through tough times, including in Winthrop's words, "much mortality, sickness, and trouble" as well as the deaths of 200 settlers during the first year. After this rocky start, the colony grew rapidly in Boston to be the largest city in colonial America and one of the most prosperous ports in the British Empire.

Election of 1932- II

Lead: Battered and depressed by the economic cataclysm that had taken down the country and was taking down his presidency, Herbert Hoover sensed he was going to lose to the challenger, Franklin Delano Roosevelt.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: With unemployment at 33% and millions in dire economic straits, the Democrats in 1932 sailed with a political gale at their backs having chosen a remarkable candidate in the patrician Governor of New York, Franklin Delano Roosevelt. A Harvard undergrad and Columbia lawyer, hailing from one of the oldest, most prominent of New York’s families, and the fifth cousin of Theodore Roosevelt, Franklin was a fixture in national Democratic circles since he was elected to the N.Y. State Senate in 1910. He served as Assistant Secretary of the Navy during the First World War and ran for Vice-president in 1920. He and Governor James M. Cox of Ohio were buried in the post-war Harding return to normalcy. And then his world crashed down around him. While swimming at a family retreat at Canada’s Campobello Island in the summer of 1921 Roosevelt contracted what at the time seemed to be poliomyelitis. In 2003 a scholarly study suggested instead that it might have been Guillain-Barré syndrome, another severe neuro-paralytic disease.

Election of 1932- I

Lead: Mired in the worst economic depression in the nation’s history, the United States faced a choice in 1932 between cold administrative competence and bold political inspiration. It was not even close.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts. 

Content: After a post-war decade of rising, though unevenly distributed, prosperity, America entered the election season of 1928 with great expectations for many more years of happy times. The Republicans claimed full responsibility for the nation’s exuberant fortunes and nominated the technocrat and Commerce Secretary Herbert Hoover to carry their standard against the Happy Warrior, Governor Alfred E. Smith of New York. Despite widespread agreement with Smith’s opposition to Prohibition, the electorate was still skeptical of electing a Roman Catholic to the nation’s top office and generally satisfied with what it perceived as Republican economic stewardship. Hoover was elected in a landslide.

The Carolina Colony and the Lords Proprietors – Part II

Lead: Between 1663 and 1729, present day North Carolina and South Carolina were ruled by the Lords Proprietors. They started out with high hopes of wealth and riches but soon discovered the bitter reality of colonization.

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

                Content: In 1663, English King Charles II paid back eight wealthy political supporters who helped him regain the English throne. Their reward: an enormous land grant in North America. It was Carolina, so named in honor of his father, the late martyred King Charles I. The eight nobles were called Lords Proprietor (ruling landlords). The vast territory contained the present day states of North and South Carolina whose western borders ran all the way to the Mississippi River. The Proprietors hoped to reap rich profits through land rent, farming and the development of commerce in the region. They especially wanted to develop silk plantations, but their dreams of cornering the market of this very expensive commodity came to grief because silk failed in the region.

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The Carolina Colony and the Lords Proprietors – I

Lead: Before North and South Carolina became royal colonies in 1729, the region was ruled by the Lords Proprietors, a group of British aristocrats who were in the game of colonization to make money. 

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

                Content: During the 1500s both the Spanish and French attempted to colonize the Carolina coast. Their efforts were followed by a failed attempt by the English on Roanoke Island in the 1580s. After the so-called Lost Colony, it was seventy-five years before Europeans attempted another settlement in the Carolinas.

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Malden Mills and the Ethical Marketplace – II

Lead: The world of business often creates a hostile relationship between worker and employer. One company which seeks to overcome such conflict is Malden Mills of Lawrence, Massachusetts.

            Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

            Content: The Fuerstein family has run Malden Mills since the company’s  founding in 1906. The latest CEO is Aaron Fuerstein, born in the decade before the Great Depression. He has guided the company through three major crises, each of which could have caused the company to founder and during each demonstrated an uncharacteristic commitment to the welfare of its employees and the community in which it did business.

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Leadership: Malden Mills and the Ethical Marketplace – I

Lead: Some say there is little room for moral decision-making in the marketplace.          

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts. 

                Content: The triumph of the market as the most efficient means of allocating scarce economic resources is a well-established fact. Despite the fascination of politicians and philosophers with socialism during the twentieth century, that is a system that is rife with waste and in the end fails to economically elevate the very population it seeks to benefit. After all the sound and fury, after all the failed experiments, by the 1990s it was clear that only a free market regimen rewards hard work and risk to a degree that creates a surplus sufficient to improve standards of living. Even governments that are committed to socialism or the command economy, at one level or another, pay homage to the marketplace in hopes of reaping its generous rewards.

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