LFM: Du Pont’s Saltpeter Mission

Lead: For 400 years service men and women have fought to carve out and defend freedom and the civilization we know as America. This series on A Moment in Time is devoted to the memory of those warriors, whose devotion gave, in the words of Lincoln at Gettysburg, the last full measure.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: In the fall of 1861, Lammot du Pont left on a secret mission. Federal stocks of saltpeter, used in making gunpowder, were running dangerously low.

Read more →

The Battle of New Orleans- II

Lead: On December 24, 1814, the Treaty of Ghent was signed in Belgium. The treaty ended the war of 1812 and jump-started the political career of Andrew Jackson.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: The greatest American victory, though, the Battle of New Orleans, which was fought on January 8, 1815, occurred fifteen days after the treaty of peace was signed. Both the United States and Great Britain were eager for peace after negotiations had gone on for several months with little progress, and the war seemed to draw to a stalemate. The treaty ended the fighting and pretty much restored the pre-war status quo with few policy changes, territorial gains or concessions from either side. John Quincy Adams, a chief negotiator for the United States, later recorded, “I hoped it would be the last treaty of peace between Great Britain and the United States.” 

The Battle of New Orleans- I

Lead: The biggest American victory of the War of 1812 was won after the war was over. The Battle of New Orleans put an exclamation point on the conflict days after a peace treaty brought hostilities to a conclusion.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: In Fall 1814, a large British fleet left Jamaica. Its goal: gain control of access to the Mississippi River. To accomplish this, the Brits needed to assault and take the City of New Orleans located on the decisive bend in the great river not far from its mouth.

Yalta Conference II

Lead: At the Yalta conference in February 1945, the soon-to-be victorious Allies struggled to determine the shape of postwar Europe and to create a mechanism to prevent future global conflicts.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: When the Big Three, Churchill, Roosevelt, and Stalin, met, they had to finalize the fate of those countries liberated after being conquered by Germany in the early years of World War II. Poland, the Baltic states, Czechoslovakia, Hungary, Bulgaria, and Romania had all been taken by the Red Army at excruciating sacrifice. Stalin was reluctant to give them up. Therefore, the Western governments, who had made an alliance of necessity with the Soviet Union in the fight against Nazi Germany, were faced with the reality dictated by Russian boots on the soil of Eastern Europe.

Yalta Conference I

Lead: In February 1945 the leaders of the United States, Great Britain, and the Soviet Union met to set the shape of post-war Europe. It would be the last time the three Allied wartime chieftains Stalin, Churchill, and Roosevelt would meet.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: The meeting took place in Yalta, a resort town east of Sevastopol in Russian Crimea. It was one of three World War II Allied peace conferences. Preceded by the Tehran Conference in 1943, Yalta would be followed by a meeting in the Berlin suburb of Potsdam the following summer. Each of the three were accompanied by a full revenue of advisors. Prime Minister Winston Churchill came with British Foreign Secretary Robert Anthony Eden. Joseph Stalin brought Commissar of Foreign Affairs Vyacheslav (vyi chis ‘laf) Mikhailovich Molotov and President Franklin Delano Roosevelt was accompanied by his special assistant Harry Hopkins and the US Secretary of State, Edward Reilly Stettinius.  

Vatican Museums II

Lead: One of the world's greatest art collections was inaugurated by Pope Julius II five hundred years ago with the purchase of a white marble statue of an ancient Trojan priest, Laocoon.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Within the walls of Vatican City is a group of connected buildings collectively known as the Vatican Palace. This complex houses several museums and galleries, a vast library, and the departments and administrative offices of the Papal bureaucracy. Since the time of Pope Julius, at the beginning of the 1500s, however, popes have also commissioned and purchased the finest art work, from antiquity to the Renaissance to modern religious art for Vatican collection. The finest architects and artists of the Italian Renaissance designed the buildings and filled the interiors with statuary, rich ornamentation and frescoes. At the center of Vatican City is St. Peter's Basilica. It can hold 60,000 people and was constructed with significant contributions by Bramante, Raphael, Bernini, and Michelangelo. Perhaps, the greatest artistic treasure is Michelangelo’s -- the frescoes on the walls and ceiling of the Sistine Chapel.  

Last Full Measure- C-Rations

Lead: For 400 years service men and women have fought to carve out and defend freedom and the civilization we know as America. This series on A Moment in Time is devoted to the memory of those warriors, whose devotion gave, in the words of Lincoln at Gettysburg, the last full measure.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: They have survived brutal blizzards, blinding sandstorms and fallen thousands of feet from planes and helicopters. Soldiers, sailors, airmen and marines both hated and loved their C-rations. In the 1930's, the Army subsistence laboratories were given the responsibility of creating food rations that could survive perilous situations. Previously, water-and-flour wafers, something like biscuits, and bitter chocolate bars were the mainstay for soldiers in the field. Unfortunately, they were repulsive and often crumbled or melted in the heat.

 

Read more →

Vatican Museums I

Lead: The smallest independent nation-state in the world was created in 1929. The 110 acres of Vatican City house the spiritual and administrative headquarters of the Roman Catholic Church.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: With a steady population of about 1,000 residents - clergy, lay people, 100 Swiss Guards and their families - Vatican City is the official residence of the pope and is the governing and religious heart of Roman Catholicism. Its unique status as an independent state resulted from the Lateran Treaty of 1929 in which the papacy gave up its ancient claims to vast areas of central Italy, the so-called Papal States, in exchange for a section of Rome that would be completely sovereign territory -- Vatican City.