John C. Calhoun –Part II

Lead: In 1832 as a part of a rising and bitter dispute with Andrew Jackson, John C. Calhoun became the first vice president to resign from office.

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

                Content: In 1828 South Carolinian and career politician John C. Calhoun was elected Vice President. He had also served as vice president in the previous administration of John Quincy Adams. It was no secret that Calhoun nursed Presidential ambitions.

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John Calhoun- Part I

Lead: In 1811 John C. Calhoun an ardent nationalist entered the U.S Congress. Later in his career his views would change. He became the leading champion of states’ rights.

                 Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

                 Content: In the decades preceding the Civil War, few Americans exerted more political influence than South Carolinian John C. Calhoun. In his long years of service he served in both houses of the U.S. Congress, as Secretary of War, Secretary of State, and Vice President under two administrations.

 

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Rural-Urban Conflict in Early 20th Century America

Lead: In the years following World War I, a cultural war marked the end of rural domination and the expansion of urban secular America. The enemy: Industry, Immigrants, and Intellectuals. 

                 Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

                Content: World War I was a great nationalizing cause. Young men from small towns and farms were drawn from their roots and deposited either in foreign trenches or huge wartime factories. The world was being made safe for democracy and Americans were leading the way.

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Independence for Scotland – II

Lead: With the end of William Wallace’s rebellion, Scotland settled into a troubled acceptance of English King Edward I direct rule. Robert Bruce began to plan otherwise.

 

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

 

                Content: From 1295 to 1306 the political situation in Scotland was chaotic. Edward I wished to rule directly and, after defeating the forces of Sir William Wallace at Falkirk in 1298, gradually brought the Scottish nobility to heel. One noble, however, Robert Bruce, Earl of Carrick, entertained private ambitions. His support for Wallace had been an off and on thing, but he had regained Edward’s confidence. 

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Independence for Scotland – I

Lead: Two leaders led Scotland in its long medieval struggle for independence from England, Robert Bruce and William Wallace.

                 Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

                Content: Throughout the high medieval period, with varying degrees of success, the rulers of England laid claim to be feudal Lord Paramount of Scotland. Whenever there was dispute among the Scottish nobility about succession to the throne, English kings would insert themselves into Scottish politics in an attempt to secure a candidate that would do their bidding. Such a scenario occurred in the years following the death of King Alexander III in 1286. The succession was in dispute for nearly half a decade when English King Edward I intervened, and installed John Balliol as his candidate. Balliol proved himself an uncooperative and rebellious vassal and in 1296 Edward brought an Army north, crushed Balliol and assumed direct rule. It would not prove an easy time for Edward. He soon was forced to deal with one of Scotland’s authentic national heroes.

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Cover-up in the Wilson White House

Lead: In the middle of an epic battle over the League of Nations, President Woodrow Wilson suffered a major stroke. His true condition was covered up for months.

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

                Content: As one of the principal architects of the post-World War I peace, Woodrow Wilson believed that the key to future international harmony was an effective League of Nations. To overcome political resistance to the League Treaty, Wilson embarked on a nation-wide tour, 8000 miles, 40 speeches to wildly enthusiastic crowds.  The tide was shifting in favor of the League. On September 25, 1919 at Pueblo, Colorado, he collapsed following a speech. Almost immediately his train returned to Washington where on the morning of October 2nd he suffered a massive stroke paralyzing his left side. It was clear within hours that he was totally incapable of carrying out his duties. Wilson’s health had been problematic since his youth and had gradually deteriorated, but his determination and frequent periods of rest had held serious sickness in check. This time it did not.

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John Singleton Mosby

Lead: After Lee’s surrender at Appomattox, the Confederacy’s premier partisan, John Singleton Mosby, had to decide how spend the rest of his life.

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.          

Content: John Mosby grew up in rural Virginia, graduated from the University in Charlottesville and established a law practice in Bristol. When the Commonwealth seceded he volunteered for service in the Cavalry, fought at the First Battle of Manassas and rose to the rank of Lieutenant. An excellent scout, throughout the summer and fall of 1862, he conducted reconnaissance patrols for General J.E.B. Stuart in Northern Virginia.

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The Polos – Part III

Lead: After a 24 years and a journey of nearly 15,000 miles, in 1295 the Polos a family of commercial traders returned to Venice from China. Marco Polo brought home stories of their exotic travels.

                 Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts. 

                Content: Their friends and relative thought they were dead. Marco developed a reputation as a consummate storyteller. He was called “Marco Milione,”  the man with a million stories, or to the more skeptical he was known as “the man of a million lies.” In 1298, Marco was captured along with 7000 compatriots and taken prisoner in after a Naval battle between Venice and her commercial rival, Genoa. During his year in prison, Marco passed the time by telling stories of his travels. One was his fellow prisoners was the Pisan writer Rusticiano, who encouraged Marco to record his fabulous tales. Aided by notes, Marco dictated an account of stories of Kublai Kahn’s prosperous, modern empire, his sophisticated communications apparatus, paper money system, mining of coal as fuel, as well as social and political customs of the empire. Rusticiano prepared Marco’s stories in a French literary dialect with the title The Description of the World or The Travels of Marco Polo.

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