Mexico: Santa Anna

Lead:  One of the most prominent figures in Mexico’s history is Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna. Flamboyant, intriguing and yet perplexing to historians, Santa Anna had lifelong ability to incite controversy.  

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Santa Anna was born of a minor criollo family in 1794 in Jalapa, Mexico, in the Sierra Madre. He was born near the turbulent end of the Spanish Colonial period and at age fifteen began service in the Spanish Army as a cadet. He was a loyalist when Mexico first began her struggle for independence in 1810, but later, along with other officers, switched allegiance. This pattern of supporting causes and leaders and then turning against them continued throughout his career revealing that he was not an ideologue, but rather believed in power, his own.

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Mexico: Miguel Hidalgo

Lead: In 1810, Father Miguel Hidalgo led an uprising against Spanish colonial rule in Mexico. Although he was defeated, he became a symbol of Mexican Independence.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.             

Content: Miguel Hidalgo was born in 1753 in the central highlands of Mexico near Guanajuato. Hidalgo was a “criollo” – born in Mexico but with Spanish ancestry. He studied in Valladolid, now Morelia in central Mexico, at first with the Jesuits, and, after their expulsion, at the College of San Nicolas Obisbo where he earned a degree in theology, philosophy and the liberal arts. He was most certainly influenced by the subversive ideas of the Enlightenment. Ordained a Catholic priest in 1778 he taught as well as doing parish work. Hidalgo was a most complex man, some would say poorly managing his passions. He loved gambling, owned multiple haciendas, and fathered several children, but at the same time combined his spiritual duties with a keen sense of social justice. In 1803 Father Hidalgo moved to Dolores, a town in the Mexican highlands of mostly poor indigenous people. He introduced new farming techniques and helped to develop a brick-making and pottery industry.

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A House Divided: Johnson’s Island Union Prison for Confederate Officers

Lead:  One hundred and fifty years ago the Republic was facing its greatest crisis. This continuing series examines the American Civil War. It is A House Divided.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: It is hard to believe but even as late as the beginning of 1862, Union and Confederate leaders were anticipating that the war was going to be short-lived. We look back and see the terrible multi-year struggle and with the benefit of hindsight find it difficult to understand the absence of strategy and planning. Yet, this kind of war, with enormous resources and entire populations marshaled in the pursuit of absolute victory, was unknown on this continent.

A House Divided: Libby Prison for Union Officers

Lead:  One hundred and fifty years ago the Republic was facing its greatest crisis. This continuing series examines the American Civil War. It is A House Divided.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Next to Andersonville, Libby Prison for Union officers in Richmond was the most infamous Confederate prison, noted for the discomfort, privation, and brutal treatment meted out to its inmates. It began life as a warehouse, half a block between and Cary and Dock Streets on the Canal in Richmond. Libby was actually a three building unified structure with interconnecting doors. Constructed by Tobacconist John Enders Sr., the west section was leased for three years prior to the war by Captain Luther Libby for his ship supplier and grocery business, hence the famous sign, L. Libby and Son, Ship Chandler’s, and the name that forever will be associated with the prison.

Time Capsule 1970: The Beatles Disband

Lead: It almost seemed impossible. A world grown accustomed to Beatlemania would have to reconcile itself to reality. In early 1970 the Beatles, the most popular rock group in history, broke apart.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Almost from their beginnings as a group in working class Liverpool, England and Hamburg, Germany, The Quarrymen, who later changed their name to The Beetles or the Beatals or Johnny and the Moondogs or Long John and the Beetles, or The Silver Beatles, but by August 1960, The Beatles, pushed the edge of rock music. At the core of the group were John Lennon, George Harrison, and Paul McCartney. Other artists had played with them, but they would emerge internationally soon after mid-1962 after they were joined by drummer and occasional soloist, Ringo Starr.

Coptic Christianity II

Lead: It was not easy, but in the years following the birth of Islam, Coptic Christianity was able to coexist in Egypt alongside its rival religion near the heart of Islamic culture.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: In the seventh century CE, not too many years after the hijira of Mohammed, Arabs invaded Egypt. For several centuries, Coptic Christians lived under various Muslim regimes, sometimes protected, sometimes persecuted, sometimes under onerous conditions, but able to survive and conduct worship. There were taxes and restrictions and the inevitable pressure to convert to Islam, but Muslim scholars respected Coptic erudition and permitted a certain flowering and preservation of this brand of Christianity.

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Coptic Christianity I

Lead: The establishment of Christianity in Egypt was early and reflected the richness of the Alexandrian Jewish community from which it probably emerged. It has continued ever since.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Coptic Christianity, the name from a European corruption of the Arabic “kibt,” itself derived from the Greek, “aiguptioi” or Egyptians, was probably in place by the end of the first century. It is said that the evangelist Mark brought the Gospel to Alexandria and preached to the large, educated Jewish community there, found a significant response, and was martyred for his efforts. There was a Catechetical School in Alexandria by 200 C.E. and in the following century, the Coptic Church was established.

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A House Divided: Democratic Convention in Charleston 1860 II

Lead:  One hundred and fifty years ago the Republic was facing its greatest crisis. This continuing series examines the American Civil War. It is A House Divided.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: On April 23, 1860, state delegations assembled in Charleston, South Carolina, for the Democratic Party convention. As the convention began, there was a rumor that some southern Democratic delegates were planning a walk out if the party did not endorse a slave code: federal protection for slavery in the western territories. This would force slavery into all parts of the country.