Gallipoli – Part III

Lead: During World War I at Gallipoli, forces of the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps, Anzac, endured a bitter and disheartening trail by fire. 

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.               

Content: In early 1915 an attempt by French and British naval units to force the strategic Dardanelles Strait in European Turkey failed. Forming the western shore of the strait is the peninsula Gallipoli extending 50-miles southwest into the Aegean Sea. This ill-fated naval expedition telegraphed the allies intent and in the month after the withdrawal of the ships the Turks reinforced their positions, hauled in heavy artillery and increased their defensive troops by a factor of six.

Read more →

Gallipoli – Part II

Lead: During World War I, the largest military amphibious landing up to that time, took place on the Gallipoli. At the heart of the attack were troops from Anzac.

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content:  In early 1915, the Allies cast their strategic eyes on the Dardenelles,  the vital waterway running between European and eastern Turkey. The Allies wanted take the strait and Constantinople, the Turkish capital, so as to control navigation between the Mediterranean and Black Seas, to open a sea route to Russia which was being pressed by Turkish forces advancing in the Caucasus region and perhaps to divert German forces which were beating up the French and British on the western front and Russia in the east.

Read more →

Gallipoli Part I

Lead: During World War I, using primarily Australian and New Zealand troops, the allies attempted to open a southern front at Gallipoli.

                 Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

                 Content: Gallipoli is a narrow, hilly peninsula in European Turkey, extending 50 miles southwest into the Aegean Sea. Along the eastern bank of the peninsula is the Dardanelles, one of the world most strategic waterways, governing access to the Mediterranean and Black Seas and vital to both sides in the war.

Read more →

The Huguenots – Part III

Lead: In 1562 a group of French Protestants, called Huguenots, led by naval officer Jean Ribaut, attempted a settlement on the Sea Islands of South Carolina but abandoned it in less than a year.

                 Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

                 Content: Forty-five years before the founding of Jamestown, Virginia, Huguenots, fleeing persecution for their faith, attempted to establish a colony in the South. Jean Ribaut determined conditions were favorable on present day Parris Island, South Carolina. There they built Charlesfort named after the French king.

Read more →

The Huguenots – Part II

Lead: Forty-five years before the settlement of Jamestown, Huguenots, French Protestants, led by French officer Jean Ribaut, attempted a permanent settlement in the New World.

                 Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

                 Content: By the early 1560s Huguenots, French followers of John Calvin, had known spectacular growth in numbers and influence. After at first dismissing the infant movement as a passing phase, Catholic nobles allied with the church stirred themselves to a program of persecution and outright warfare against rival Protestants. Between 1562 and 1598, eight wars of religion ripped apart French national life. The climax came in the summer of 1572 when 2000 thousands of Huguenots were murdered in Paris by Catholic mobs on St. Bartholomew’s Day. Thousands more were killed out in the countryside. In response to such persecution, over the next century hundreds of thousands of Huguenots left France to find religious toleration elsewhere. In 1562 Huguenot Admiral Gaspard de Coligny, organized an expedition to the New World to establish a colony, which would serve as an asylum for persecuted Huguenots.

Read more →

The Huguenots – Part I

Lead: By 1655 Protestantism had taken root in France. The Huguenot movement grew with such vigor that it transformed the religious and political landscape of France. Soon religious dispute became religious warfare.

                 Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

                 Content: The Protestant Reformation had its roots in the heart of Europe and in England. Jon Hus in Bohemia and John Wycliff in England articulated early efforts at reform and Martin Luther’s work in Germany after 1517 marked the dissolution of European Christian unity. France was largely spared the turmoil emerging from Germany until the writings of a French expatriate, former Catholic humanist scholar, John Calvin, began to make their way across the border from Geneva, Switzerland where he had taken refuge in the 1530s. Calvin’s Institute of the Christian Religion, in its many editions, struck a responsive chord among many Frenchmen anxious for social and political, as well as religious reform. The connection between the Vatican in Rome and the French ruling class, royal and aristocratic, was extremely close. In exchange for championing the Roman Catholic Church in France and throughout Europe, French kings were permitted unusual control over church affairs in France. It was a relationship, symbiotic, mutually beneficial and corrupt.

Read more →

Azaria Chamberlain and Media Power – II

Lead: In August 1980 nine-week old Azaria Chamberlain disappeared from the family camping tent near Ayers Rock in central Australia. Her parents became the center of a firestorm of hype demonstrating the power of the popular media for good or ill.

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

                Content:  Ridiculous rumors were rife. The name Azaria, people said, meant sacrifice in the wilderness. The child had been seen in black baby clothing, or maybe white baby clothes with a black fringe. She had been mentally injured in an accident and since her parents Seventh Day Adventist faith allegedly rejected such a condition, Azaria had been taken to the Rock and ritually killed. Her mother Lindy suffered from depression. A dingo couldn’t drag an infant off, tear it out of a buttoned up jumpsuit and eat it.

Read more →

Azaria Chamberlain and Media Power – I

Lead: In the winter of 1980, nine-week-old Azaria Chamberlain disappeared from the family tent near Ayers Rock in central Australia. Her mother said, “The dingo’s got my baby.” Others were not so sure.

 

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

 

                Content: Ayers Rock, known to indigenous Australians as Uluru, is the world’s largest monolith, a single structure of course grained limestone, 318 meters above and 3.5 miles the below the desert floor near Alice Springs in Northern Territory of Australia. Depending on the hour and climatic conditions the rock can radiate spectacular variety of color. Thousands visit each year to examine its unique characteristics or to worship.

Read more →