Samuel Johnson and Tavern Life

Lead:  Samuel Johnson’s love affair with London was nurtured in taverns. He loved the company, fine food, lively conversations and intellectual stimulation found there. He once said, “the tavern chair was the throne of human felicity.”

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: In eighteenth century London, coffee houses and taverns provided a social setting where one could broaden one’s intellectual horizons. Taverns served food and drink, most often being wine. Beer, for those slightly lower on the social pecking order, could be had at alehouses. People gathered for conversation and entertainment over dinner. Clubs and societies (many by invitation only) were organized and met regularly in taverns.

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Eleanor Gwyn II

Lead:  In the aftermath of the puritan ascendency, in the 1660s England re-opened its theaters. There on the stage of King’s Theater on Drury Lane, acclaimed comedienne Eleanor “Nell” Gwyn auditioned for her greatest role.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: After nearly two decades of Puritan rule, the revival of English theater gave opportunity to actresses such as Nell Gwyn. By the age of 15, she had extracted herself from a dead job serving drinks at her mother's brothel and become England's most acclaimed comedienne. She captured the hearts of audiences and, eventually, that of the kingdom's most renowned theater lover, Charles Stuart, King of England.

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Eleanor Gwyn I

Lead: After nearly two decades of religious experimentation under the puritans, gradually, fitfully after 1660 the English began to loosen up. One giant step was that entertainment-deprived England reopened its theaters. This gave the big break to Eleanor Gwyn.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Cultural revival was the order of the day in the years following the restoration of King Charles II in 1660. Banished were the puritans and their attempt to rigidly enforce social behavior. Games could be played again on the Sabbath and the English could once again indulge in their love of the theater. Closed for twenty-three years, the theaters reopened with a splash -- elaborate costumes, intricate sets and for the first time, female performers. On April 8, 1663 the lights went up in Drury Lane at the King's Theatre. It would soon witness the emergence of one of England's favorites, Nelly Gywn.

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LFM: P-51 Mustang

Lead: For 400 years service men and women have fought to carve out and defend freedom and the civilization we know as America. This series on A Moment in Time is devoted to the memory of those warriors, whose devotion gave, in the words of Lincoln at Gettysburg, the last full measure.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: In the run-up to the Normandy invasion, the Allies faced a daunting problem. They had to secure air superiority in order to insure the invasion’s success. This meant that they had to destroy the Luftwaffe, the German Air Force. As long as Germany could continue to produce ample quantities of high quality fighter aircraft such as the Messerschmitt 109 and continue to train and bring experienced pilots on line, then the goal of removing German air power would go begging.

Cultural Revolution of China II

Lead: The shock troops of the 1960s upheaval, the Chinese Cultural Revolution, were the Red Guards. They became an irresistible force of terror inflicting brutal treatment on thousands of Chinese citizens and destroying priceless parts of China's cultural heritage.   

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: In 1966, Chinese Communist Chairman Mao Zedong launched the Cultural Revolution. Ostensibly, it was a movement designed to shore up the communist movement in China but in reality it was an ill disguised means for Mao, then in his twilight years, to protect his own power and firmly establish his legacy. To accomplish this, the chairman caused the creation of an army of young idealists, the Red Guards, and sent them out to attack any who would deviate from his own principles.

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Cultural Revolution of China I

Lead:  In 1966, Chinese leader Mao Zedong launched the Cultural Revolution. It was an attempt to shore up his power and secure his legacy long into the future. It ended up nearly destroying China. 

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Mao had been the leader and the heart of Chinese Communism since the 1920s. Though not the founder of the party, he had nursed the movement in its infancy, preserved it during the dark years when in order to survive, the Red Army in various groups had to flee by the Long March into interior China during the Civil War. He had led the Communists in common cause with Chiang Kai-shek and the Kuomintang against the Japanese in the 1930s and 1940s and in 1949 had triumphed over Chiang, banishing the latter to Taiwan and establishing undisputed Communist control of the mainland.

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Samuel Johnson- Quakers and Women Preachers

Lead: One of the unintended consequences of the Enlightenment was the gradual emergence of women into public life, including preaching, something many, especially Samuel Johnson, thought was entirely too much progress. Opening the way for women were the Quakers.  

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Established in the middle of the 1600s, the Society of Friends was held suspect by nearly all parts of the religious and political spectrum, its members often arrested and persecuted. Early leader George Fox was jailed no less than nine times throughout his life. On one such occasion he warned the presiding judge to "tremble at the word of the Lord." The judge thought that funny and inadvertently gave the movement its name, calling Fox and his followers "quakers."

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LFM – Walt Whitman

Lead: For 400 years service men and women have fought to carve out and defend freedom and the civilization we know as America. This series on A Moment in Time is devoted to the memory of those warriors, whose devotion gave, in the words of Lincoln at Gettysburg, the last full measure.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Though he is perhaps best known as the “Poet of Democracy,” chronicling the lives of working men in whose vocations he apprenticed as a youth and later, Walt Whitman also portrayed the heroic and tragic adventure of war, detailing the crushed dreams, lingering hopes and heartbreak of soldiers, North and South, in the Republic’s greatest epic, the American Civil War.

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