Founding of Georgia – I

Lead: Founded by charter in 1732, the colony of Georgia served two purposes in its earliest years. The most important of these was to create a land buffer and military outpost between hostile Spanish territory and the rich colony of Carolina.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: From even before the beginning of their colonization of North America, the English looked with foreboding south along the Atlantic seaboard at the well-established and powerful Spanish settlements in Florida and the Caribbean. The success of Virginia and Carolina made them even more vulnerable to attacks from the hostile territory to the South.

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The Last Full Measure – Francis Marion, The Swamp Fox

Lead: For 400 years service men and women have fought to carve out and defend freedom and the civilization we know as America. This series on A Moment in Time (is presented by the people of _________ and) is devoted to the memory of those warriors, whose sacrifice gave, in the words of Lincoln at Gettysburg, the last full measure.

Content: From the opening of hostilities at Lexington and Concord in 1775 until signing of the Treaty of Paris in 1783, the Revolution was America's longest war until the Vietnam conflict. While tension between Loyalist and Patriot sympathizers continued throughout the former colonies, active fighting for the most part had shifted to the South after 1779. First Savannah, then Charleston fell, and British forces under Lord Cornwallis began a series of raids into the interior culminating in the Battle of Camden, South Carolina in August, 1780. Patriot forces under the command of General Horatio Gates suffered a disastrous defeat. After that there appeared almost nothing standing in the way of ultimate victory for the British commanders. In 1780 the fleeting hopes of American Independence were kept alive in the South by partisan guerrillas.

 

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A House Divided: Manifest Destiny II

Lead: One hundred and fifty years ago the Republic was facing its greatest crisis. This continuing series examines the American Civil War. It is "A House Divided."

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Manifest destiny was the idea that it was the birthright of the United States to stretch unimpeded from coast to coast. Abolitionists, those opposed to slavery, were generally supported of this expansion, but also had nagging doubts that the whole enterprise was a conspiracy to expand slavery and continue the South’s domination over the Federal Union it had maintained since the Revolution. And they had a point. Through the 1840s expansion had tended to benefit the slave interest. In the years following 1800 many more slave states had entered the Union than free ones. Future expansion, because it would come largely in the southwest, would simply confirm this trend.

 

A House Divided: Manifest Destiny I

Lead: One hundred and fifty years ago the Republic was facing its greatest crisis. This continuing series examines the American Civil War. It is "A House Divided."

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: By the 1830s Thomas Jefferson’s vision of a vast continent-wide democracy had been sucked into the great issue of the time. Slave and free interests fought for the fruits of manifest destiny. The third President set aside his limited notion of federal power when he seized the opportunity offered by Napoleon Bonaparte and purchased the vastness of Louisiana. Expansion westward had been part of the intellectual DNA of the Democratic Party since its founding. By hook or crook, Democrats determined, both Atlantic and Pacific would wash upon the shores of the United States, this despite the preferences of Mexicans, Indians, Spanish or Canadians who might wish otherwise.

 

Time Capsule Rise and Decline of H. Ross Perot

Lead: 1992 witnessed the spectacular political rise of H. Ross Perot. He stirred up the presidential election that year and may have caused the loss of an incumbent president.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: To a casual observer, the arrival of Ross Perot on the national scene may have been a surprise, but in reality the Texas billionaire had been active in national affairs for a long time. Perot graduated from the United States Naval Academy in 1953, served his term of active duty, and began his career as a salesman for IBM.

Pete Rozelle and the National Football League

Lead: For 21st Century fans his name is a distant memory, but if you like NFL football, you can thank Pete Rozelle.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: When Rozelle became NFL Commissioner in 1960, his part of professional football was a chaotic mess. It consisted of 12 teams owned by 12 megalomaniacs with the new American Football League threatening them all with competition and doom.

The Algonquin Roundtable – II

Lead: The years that followed World War I were optimistic and happy times, a new era of creativity in culture and letters. Leading the way were the members of the Algonquin Roundtable.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: They changed the face of American humor. “A hard-bitten crew,” said Edna Ferber, author of Giant, of her fellows at the Roundtable which met daily for lunch at the Algonquin Hotel in New York, “but if they liked your work they said so publicly and whole-heartedly.” They were fluent, fresh, acerbic, and tough. And could they make you laugh. Ferber insisted that, “being an old maid is like death by drowning, a really delightful sensation, after you cease to struggle.”

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The Algonquin Roundtable – I

Lead: In the years following World War I, a group of future literary stars began to meet for lunch at the fabled Algonquin Hotel in New York.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: World War I helped transform society, culture, religion, manners and literary standards into what became the modern era. In America, New York was the center of this transforming spirit and for a decade in the 1920s driving this revolution in thought and energy was the Algonquin Roundtable or as one author has described them, “the vicious circle.” This informal lunch gathering got its start when writers John Peter Toohey and Dorothy Parker and columnist Franklin Pierce Adams organized a celebration and lampooning of the wartime service of their friend Alexander Woollcott, critic for the New York Times. He was so enthusiastic about his his service, that the duty of friendship required them to shut him up. The Algonquin, just off Broadway on Forty-fourth Street, was already a prestigious gathering place for actors and the literary set so it was a logical place for the event. When he found their friendly sarcasm hugely amusing, one of their number suggested that they meet daily for lunch and a historic tradition commenced.

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