Tet Offensive – III

Lead: In the early morning hours of January 30, 1968, communist forces began attacking the major cities of South Vietnam. In the end they lost the Tet Offensive badly, but it really didn’t matter.

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

                Content: By 1967 the second war in Vietnam was in gridlock. NVA defense minister Vo Nguyen Giap, encouraged by Ho Chi Minh, planned one masterstroke with all the forces the north could muster. He planned it for the Tet holiday in January, 1968 but Giap’s plan depended on absolute surprise. Getting 80,000 troops in place to attack was a logistics nightmare for the relatively primitive northern army and therefore, Giap planned a series of diversionary attacks to draw allied troops away from the cities. Loc Ninh, Dak To, and especially the isolated U.S. Marine outpost at Khe Sanh came under severe pressure. The U.S. took the bait and shifted its resources despite the fact that intelligence indicated an enormous enemy buildup.

 

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Tet Offensive – II

Lead: The urban offensive during the Tet holiday in 1968 revealed serious miscalculations. Some were North Vietnamese. Some were American.

                 Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

               Content: By 1967 the second war in Vietnam was not going well for the communists. The regime in Saigon was not that popular. Its support was tepid but it had a very powerful ally in the United States. President Johnson, determined not to lose another country to communism, had committed large numbers of combat troops to the theater. Neither Viet Cong nor North Vietnamese regular troops could compete with U.S. military firepower, mobility or logistical support.

 

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Tet Offensive 1968 – I

Lead: At the end of January 1968, Viet Cong and NVA regular forces launched powerful attacks against South Vietnam’s cities. For the allies the Tet offensive was at once a great victory and a great defeat. 

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

                Content: Almost from the moment of partition of Vietnam in 1954 and the departure of the colonial French, the communist regime in the North began organizing the second Vietnam War. North Vietnam established a network of political and military operatives in the south known as the Viet Cong. This organization  recruited indigenous sympathizers and conducted low level partisan guerilla warfare aimed at destabilizing the government of South Vietnam and the work of the south’s principal ally the United States.

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Gallipoli – Part III

Lead: During World War I at Gallipoli, forces of the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps, Anzac, endured a bitter and disheartening trail by fire. 

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.               

Content: In early 1915 an attempt by French and British naval units to force the strategic Dardanelles Strait in European Turkey failed. Forming the western shore of the strait is the peninsula Gallipoli extending 50-miles southwest into the Aegean Sea. This ill-fated naval expedition telegraphed the allies intent and in the month after the withdrawal of the ships the Turks reinforced their positions, hauled in heavy artillery and increased their defensive troops by a factor of six.

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Gallipoli – Part II

Lead: During World War I, the largest military amphibious landing up to that time, took place on the Gallipoli. At the heart of the attack were troops from Anzac.

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content:  In early 1915, the Allies cast their strategic eyes on the Dardenelles,  the vital waterway running between European and eastern Turkey. The Allies wanted take the strait and Constantinople, the Turkish capital, so as to control navigation between the Mediterranean and Black Seas, to open a sea route to Russia which was being pressed by Turkish forces advancing in the Caucasus region and perhaps to divert German forces which were beating up the French and British on the western front and Russia in the east.

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Gallipoli Part I

Lead: During World War I, using primarily Australian and New Zealand troops, the allies attempted to open a southern front at Gallipoli.

                 Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

                 Content: Gallipoli is a narrow, hilly peninsula in European Turkey, extending 50 miles southwest into the Aegean Sea. Along the eastern bank of the peninsula is the Dardanelles, one of the world most strategic waterways, governing access to the Mediterranean and Black Seas and vital to both sides in the war.

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The Huguenots – Part III

Lead: In 1562 a group of French Protestants, called Huguenots, led by naval officer Jean Ribaut, attempted a settlement on the Sea Islands of South Carolina but abandoned it in less than a year.

                 Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

                 Content: Forty-five years before the founding of Jamestown, Virginia, Huguenots, fleeing persecution for their faith, attempted to establish a colony in the South. Jean Ribaut determined conditions were favorable on present day Parris Island, South Carolina. There they built Charlesfort named after the French king.

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The Huguenots – Part II

Lead: Forty-five years before the settlement of Jamestown, Huguenots, French Protestants, led by French officer Jean Ribaut, attempted a permanent settlement in the New World.

                 Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

                 Content: By the early 1560s Huguenots, French followers of John Calvin, had known spectacular growth in numbers and influence. After at first dismissing the infant movement as a passing phase, Catholic nobles allied with the church stirred themselves to a program of persecution and outright warfare against rival Protestants. Between 1562 and 1598, eight wars of religion ripped apart French national life. The climax came in the summer of 1572 when 2000 thousands of Huguenots were murdered in Paris by Catholic mobs on St. Bartholomew’s Day. Thousands more were killed out in the countryside. In response to such persecution, over the next century hundreds of thousands of Huguenots left France to find religious toleration elsewhere. In 1562 Huguenot Admiral Gaspard de Coligny, organized an expedition to the New World to establish a colony, which would serve as an asylum for persecuted Huguenots.

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