1968: Democratic National Convention II

Introduction: A Moment in Time, 1968: A special series on the 40th anniversary of a year of upheaval, in a world seemingly out of control.

Content: From August 26-29, 1968, the eyes of the political world were fixed on Chicago and nominating convention of the Democratic Party. It was not a pretty sight. Inside the Chicago Amphitheater where the Convention met, the bright divisions within the Party were laid bare for all to see. The issue animating the struggle of course was the Vietnam War. It was seen as Lyndon Johnson’s war, but he was not there to contend for the nomination. Having recognized his unpopularity and problem re-election prospects, in the Spring he had declined to run for a second full term. His heir apparent was Vice-president Hubert Humphrey, former Senator from Minnesota and early champion of civil rights. An old-line liberal, he had been abandoned by many of his colleagues on the left because of his steadfast support for Johnson’s war policy.

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1968: The Southern Strategy III

Introduction: A Moment in Time, 1968: A special series on the 40th anniversary of a year of upheaval, in a world seemingly out of control.

Content: In 1968 Richard Nixon ran for President by courting white voters in the south skeptical of African American progress. This so-called “southern strategy” secured for him election as President. It was one of the most brilliant political transformations in American history, but it had its downside.

 

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1968: The Southern Strategy II

Introduction: A Moment in Time, 1968: A special series on the 40th anniversary of a year of upheaval, in a world seemingly out of control.

Content: Following his dismal failure in southern states in the election of 1960, Richard Nixon developed a cunning Southern Strategy for 1968 and for future years. Even in the midst of his horrific national loss in 1964, Barry Goldwater carried many southern states and proved to the Republican party that in the South, conservative white voters, skeptical of African American progress and disturbed by many modern trends in religion and society, were ripe for the GOP harvest. It was one of the most brilliant political transformations in American history.

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1968: Democratic National Convention III

Introduction: A Moment in Time, 1968: A special series on the 40th anniversary of a year of upheaval, in a world seemingly out of control.

                Content: Jerry Rubin was a Yippie, the nickname for members of the Youth International Party of which he was a founder. He and his troops descended on Chicago determined to protest the Vietnam War and racism in America. Denied permits to assemble and camp in city parks, the Yippies joined thousands of other activists on the streets of Chicago. In typically purple prose, Rubin warned of momentous events to come: "On Wednesday night the shit is really going to hit the fan 'cause we bust out of this park and go down to Grant Park and then go out to the amphitheater. There're going to be some right strange theatrical events. And you'd better have your theater thing down pretty pat."

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Great Awakening II

Lead: During the early 1700s in America, the First Great Awakening, a religious revival, had profound effect on American Protestantism and in part paved the way for the American Revolution.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Jonathan Edwards was born in East Windsor Connecticut in 1703. A precocious youth, he entered Yale at the age of 13 graduating in 1720. Eventually he made his way to the Congregational church in Northhampton, Massachusetts, where he understudied with his maternal grandfather and at the older minister’s death in 1729, succeeded him. A brief outburst of religious ferment at Northhampton in 1734 slowly began to spread throughout the Connecticut Valley. It was intensified in the 1740s through the itinerant preaching of Edwards, others of like mind, and especially the Anglican evangelist George Whitefield. The latter’s preaching to vast crowds in open air meetings throughout the colonies helped spread the religious enthusiasm.

 

 

Polio II

Lead: 1916 marked the beginning of a polio epidemic in the United States that would not end until 1955. It did so as one of the major medical success stories of the twentieth century.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Polio, poliomyelitis, also known as infantile paralysis, is a viral infection of the intestinal tract that sometimes can attack the central nervous system and lead to severe muscular paralysis. After the 1916 outbreak, the United States averaged 21,000 paralytic cases per year. During the 1930s and 1940s both private and government research was accelerated to try to find a cure for this dreaded disease. The National Foundation of Infantile Paralysis, now the March of Dimes, was inaugurated by FDR in 1938 for the purpose of raising money, one dime at a time, to fund polio research. Americans waited with not a great deal of patience for a breakthrough.

 

 

Polio I

Lead: Summertime in 1930s and 1940s was exciting for children out of school, but a time of fear as well. Parents were worried their children might contract polio.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Poliomyelitis is a viral infection of the intestinal tract. Most cases of polio were mild, headache, fever, sore throat, depression; the patient usually recovers within three or four days. In fewer and more serious cases, the virus penetrates the stomach and intestinal tract, enters the lymphatic system, then the bloodstream and then attacks the motor nerve cells of the spinal cord; if the nerve damage is severe, paralysis will result. Occurring most frequently in children, polio is also known as infantile paralysis.

 

 

Anne Hutchinson II

Lead: In 1637 the Massachusetts Bay Colony put religious reformer Anne Hutchinson on trial for challenging the authority and theology of the Church.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Hutchinson and her family had emigrated from England to the Massachusetts to escape what they felt was religious persecution. An intelligent and independent thinker, Anne began to hold a weekly discussion group in her home. She and her followers did not hesitate to criticize the colony’s religious and political leaders for what they perceived as the leaders’ narrowness on morality and religion. Anne held the dangerous view that God spoke to individuals rather than through the clergy or church officials. Believing Hutchinson to be a threat to order and peace, the Massachusetts General Assembly enacted a law stipulating that women could neither organize, lead, nor attend meetings. Undaunted, Anne refused to stop and John Winthrop, one of the founders and Governor of the colony, in 1637, brought her to trial for insulting churches and their ministers and not honoring the fathers of the Commonwealth.