A House Divided (25): Slave Fugitives -Battle of Christiana–I

Lead: One hundred and fifty years ago the Republic was facing its greatest crisis. This continuing series examines the American Civil War. It is "A House Divided."

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: “The only way to make the Fugitive Slave Law a dead letter, said African American leader Frederick Douglass, “is to make half a dozen or more dead kidnappers.” Nothing was more illustrative of the deteriorating national situation in the 1850s than the poisonous circumstances surrounding fugitive slaves and the federal assistance demanded by the South in its securing human property. The greater the success the South had, the more vigorous was the resistance in the north. It did not take long after the 1850 law went into effect that it was dipped in blood.

France Surrenders to Germany – 1940

Lead: It ended almost before it began. Using lightning tactics perfected in Poland the previous autumn, in May 1940 Germany forced France to surrender.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.
Content: For eight months after the collapse of Poland in September 1939, Allied and Axis forces engaged in what in the West was called the Phony War or Twilight War. The Germans named it sitskreig or sitting war.

A House Divided: Wilmot Proviso

Lead:  One hundred and fifty years ago the Republic was facing its greatest crisis. This continuing series examines the American Civil War. It is A House Divided.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: David Wilmot was a freshman congressman from Pennsylvania. In early August 1846 as the U.S. Congress approached its summer recess, Wilmot proposed that slavery be banned from any territory acquired by conquest or purchase from Mexico.

TC: Richard Nixon’s Triumph Before the Fall

Lead: In January 1972, Richard Nixon was inaugurated for a second term after winning one of the greatest triumphs in U.S. presidential history. Then it all came crashing down.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Defeating an incumbent President of the United States is tough. It can be done, as Herbert Hoover, Jimmy Carter and George H.W. Bush found to their regret, but it is no easy task. Circumstances, political and otherwise, have to work perfectly to the advantage of the challenger.

A House Divided: Slave or Free Labor I

Lead:  One hundred and fifty years ago the Republic was facing its greatest crisis. This continuing series examines the American Civil War. It is A House Divided.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: One of the most intense debates in the 1850s run-up to the Civil War involved the contrasting value of slavery and slave labor as opposed to free labor. Southerners attempted to justify their peculiar institution by asserting that slavery was good for the slave, the general economy and for society. One of the most aggressive proponents of this view was George Fitzhugh, scion of an ancient Virginia family that had fallen on hard times. His writings asserted that slavery was the normal circumstance of the human condition. Free labor, as practiced in the North, was a kind collective cannibalism.

A House Divided: Lincoln vs. Douglas on Slavery III

Lead: One hundred and fifty years ago the Republic was facing its greatest crisis. This continuing series examines the American Civil War. It is "A House Divided."

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content:  In their Senatorial debates in 1858, Democratic incumbent Stephen A. Douglas knew how to exploit the prejudice of whites and that it was a winning tactic. To great applause he asserted that Negroes should always be kept in subjugation. They were inferior. Lincoln’s insistence that blacks had a claim to the ‘created equality’ of the founders was a “monstrous heresy.” Did Jefferson really mean to say in his Declaration that his black slaves were actually entitled to parity in Divine law? Or that the great Virginian was in daily violation of God’s law by holding men and women in bondage.

A House Divided: Lincoln vs. Douglas on Slavery II

Lead: One hundred and fifty years ago the Republic was facing its greatest crisis. This continuing series examines the American Civil War. It is "A House Divided."

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: As Stephen Douglas and Abraham Lincoln exchanged arguments in their famous 1858 Senatorial debates they both had strengths and weaknesses. Lincoln had at his disposal the powerful moral tradition of the founders’ conviction that slavery was evil and that restrictions on its spread would lead ultimately to its disappearance. Yet, he was forced to defend the intellectually tenuous argument that freedom did not necessarily lead to full equality.

A House Divided: Lincoln vs. Douglas on Slavery I

Lead: One hundred and fifty years ago the Republic was facing its greatest crisis. This continuing series examines the American Civil War. It is "A House Divided."

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: They are perhaps the most famous debates in U.S. history. Seven encounters in the run up to the November, 1858 elections for Senator from Illinois. The protagonists, Republican challenger Abraham Lincoln, and the incumbent Democrat Senator Stephen A. Douglas, brought into bright, bold relief what was emerging as most compelling issue of the time, the future of chattel slavery in America.