History’s Turning Points: History’s Tricks

 

Lead: Historical study often helps reveal twists in the human journey. This series on A Moment in Time examines history’s turning points.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: In his first volume of Reason in Common Sense, the Spanish-born Harvard philosopher Jorge Agustín Nicolás Ruiz de Santayana y Borrás, more popularly known as George Santayana, was attempting to explain the true nature of progress. He asserted that retentiveness is an essential part of change, bringing something of value from the past. Absent the coach of experience, change, much less progress, cannot lead to improvement in the future. Misquoted and paraphrased in countless ways over the years, his most famous aphorism describes life unprotected by the values of past experience as like unto that among savages where infancy is everlasting. He wrote, “Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it.”

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A House Divided: Team of Rivals I

Lead: One hundred and fifty years ago the Republic was facing its greatest crisis. This continuing series examines the American Civil War. It is "A House Divided."

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: It is hardly an exaggeration to say that in winter and spring 1861 Abraham Lincoln faced a daunting series of challenges. Not only was the Republic disintegrating, with state after state pulling out of the Union, the elected but not-yet-sworn-in Chief Magistrate had to watch helplessly as events spun out of control with no power to arrest what was clearly becoming a slide into chaos.

 

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A House Divided: Missouri Secession I

Lead: One hundred and fifty years ago the Republic was facing its greatest crisis. This continuing series examines the American Civil War. It is "A House Divided."

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: In the early months of 1861 the leadership of both North and South were engaged in a delicate minuet to enlarge or diminish the numbers of states signing up for the new Confederacy. The upper south, Tennessee, North Carolina and especially Virginia had departed the Union by springtime. It remained to be seen if the slave border states Maryland, Kentucky and Missouri, would follow.

 

 

 

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History’s Turning Points: Japan Rediscovers the Gun II

 

Lead: Historical study often helps reveal twists in the human journey. Consider history’s turning points: Japan rediscovers the gun.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

Content: In 1543 visiting Portuguese explorers jumped from the deck of a Chinese commercial ship into Japanese shallow waters and with their muskets shot a duck. The unfavorable results on the duck were duly noted by Lord Tokitaka who purchased from the Portuguese two guns and commissioned his swordsmiths to copy these new weapons. Within a century firearms were playing a widespread, destructive role in the dynastic and feudal warfare consuming the Japanese upper class. These weapons were very good, indeed the Japanese significantly improved on comparable European designs. One such innovation was waterproof rain protection for the ignition platform, but soon the Japanese abandoned firearms and mostly returned to hand-held weapons such as the sword and the bow and arrow.

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History’s Turing Points: Japan Discovers the Gun I

 

Lead: Historical study often helps reveal twists in the human journey. Consider history’s turning points: Japan rediscovers the gun.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

Content: Japan has taken a well-earned place in the modern era as a seat of much industrial innovation. Within 60 years of the visit of Commodore Perry in 1855, Japan had wrenched itself so significantly into the contemporary world that its navy had inflicted havoc on Russian naval forces at the Battle of Tsushima in the Russo-Japanese War, sending the pride of the Czar’s fleet to the bottom of the Sea of Japan. In another thirty-six years, Japan would temporarily humble the world’s preeminent industrial power at Pearl Harbor.

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LFM: Sousa’s Greatest March

 
Lead: For 400 years service men and women have fought to carve out and defend freedom and the civilization we know as America. This series on A Moment in Time is devoted to the memory of those warriors, whose devotion gave, in the words of Lincoln at Gettysburg, the last full measure.

Intro: A Moment In Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: On May 14, 1897 John Philip Sousa stood at the podium of the Philadelphia Academy of Music, lifted his baton, and began leading his greatest march. Two encores later the crowd was still on its feet.

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Spanish Cultural Diversity II

Lead: Attempts to suppress cultural and religious diversity have been one of the hallmarks of modern Spain. From the work of the Spanish Inquisition to the dictatorship of Francisco Franco, these efforts have only lightly covered over real differences. In 1978 Spain tried a new way.

 

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

 

                Content: For thirty-six years, the last caudillo, Francisco Franco held his thumb in dike of progress. It was a valiant, but futile attempt at keeping parts of Spanish life, religion, culture, and politics under wraps, while opening the way to economic innovation, outside markets, and prosperity. Franco failed, but it remained to be seen how post-Franco Spain would deal with the changing world outside as well how it would accommodate long-standing and suppressed internal regional conflict.

Nellie Ross

Lead: In 1924 Wyoming became the first state to elect a woman to the office of Governor. Nellie Tayloe Ross served for two years and went on to distinguished national service.

                 Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

                 Content: With the ratification of the 19th Amendment to the Constitution in August 1920, the right to vote became a national right for women. The question remained whether women, now able to vote, would also attain full parity in political participation. When would women be elected to local office or congress in numbers comparable to their percentage in the population? The answer was not too soon. Decades would pass before women would step forward to assume a leadership role anything close to that of men in commerce, social life and politics. Progress was slow. One exception was Nellie Ross.