A House Divided (25): Slave Fugitives -Battle of Christiana–I

Lead: One hundred and fifty years ago the Republic was facing its greatest crisis. This continuing series examines the American Civil War. It is "A House Divided."

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: “The only way to make the Fugitive Slave Law a dead letter, said African American leader Frederick Douglass, “is to make half a dozen or more dead kidnappers.” Nothing was more illustrative of the deteriorating national situation in the 1850s than the poisonous circumstances surrounding fugitive slaves and the federal assistance demanded by the South in its securing human property. The greater the success the South had, the more vigorous was the resistance in the north. It did not take long after the 1850 law went into effect that it was dipped in blood.

France Surrenders to Germany – 1940

Lead: It ended almost before it began. Using lightning tactics perfected in Poland the previous autumn, in May 1940 Germany forced France to surrender.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.
Content: For eight months after the collapse of Poland in September 1939, Allied and Axis forces engaged in what in the West was called the Phony War or Twilight War. The Germans named it sitskreig or sitting war.

A House Divided: Wilmot Proviso

Lead:  One hundred and fifty years ago the Republic was facing its greatest crisis. This continuing series examines the American Civil War. It is A House Divided.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: David Wilmot was a freshman congressman from Pennsylvania. In early August 1846 as the U.S. Congress approached its summer recess, Wilmot proposed that slavery be banned from any territory acquired by conquest or purchase from Mexico.

A House Divided: Wilmot Proviso

Lead:  One hundred and fifty years ago the Republic was facing its greatest crisis. This continuing series examines the American Civil War. It is A House Divided.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: David Wilmot was a freshman congressman from Pennsylvania. In early August 1846 as the U.S. Congress approached its summer recess, Wilmot proposed that slavery be banned from any territory acquired by conquest or purchase from Mexico.

TC: Richard Nixon’s Triumph Before the Fall

Lead: In January 1972, Richard Nixon was inaugurated for a second term after winning one of the greatest triumphs in U.S. presidential history. Then it all came crashing down.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Defeating an incumbent President of the United States is tough. It can be done, as Herbert Hoover, Jimmy Carter and George H.W. Bush found to their regret, but it is no easy task. Circumstances, political and otherwise, have to work perfectly to the advantage of the challenger.

John Maynard Keynes Predicts Disaster-II

Lead: As part of the British delegation to the Versailles Peace Conference after World War One, John Maynard Keynes became increasingly disenchanted with the hostile attitude of the allies toward Germany.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: the conference was driven by three main leaders: Lloyd George of Great Britain, Clemenceau of France, and Wilson of the United States. The conference is needed to deal the divisions in Europe after four years of terrible fighting. It failed miserably.

John Maynard Keynes Predicts Disaster-I

Lead: Known primarily for his groundbreaking work on economics during the Great Depression, John Maynard Keynes first gained international renown after the World War I Versailles Peace Conference.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Keynes was born in the early 1880s to an academic family in Cambridge England. He studied at Eaton and then at King's College, Cambridge. He graduated with first-class honors in mathematics, but ironically tested poorly on economics. After university Keynes became a civil servant, working on currency issues at Britain's India Office.

A House Divided: Slave or Free Labor I

Lead:  One hundred and fifty years ago the Republic was facing its greatest crisis. This continuing series examines the American Civil War. It is A House Divided.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: One of the most intense debates in the 1850s run-up to the Civil War involved the contrasting value of slavery and slave labor as opposed to free labor. Southerners attempted to justify their peculiar institution by asserting that slavery was good for the slave, the general economy and for society. One of the most aggressive proponents of this view was George Fitzhugh, scion of an ancient Virginia family that had fallen on hard times. His writings asserted that slavery was the normal circumstance of the human condition. Free labor, as practiced in the North, was a kind collective cannibalism.