1968: The Southern Strategy I

Introduction: A Moment in Time, 1968: A special series on the 40th anniversary of a year of upheaval, in a world seemingly out of control.

Content: In signing the epic 1964 Civil Right bill, President Lyndon Johnson is said to have lamented to one of his aides, Bill Moyer, that “I may have just turned the South over to the Republican Party for the next generation.” His prediction was accurate to the point of being uncanny.

 

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1968: Democratic National Convention II

Introduction: A Moment in Time, 1968: A special series on the 40th anniversary of a year of upheaval, in a world seemingly out of control.

Content: From August 26-29, 1968, the eyes of the political world were fixed on Chicago and nominating convention of the Democratic Party. It was not a pretty sight. Inside the Chicago Amphitheater where the Convention met, the bright divisions within the Party were laid bare for all to see. The issue animating the struggle of course was the Vietnam War. It was seen as Lyndon Johnson’s war, but he was not there to contend for the nomination. Having recognized his unpopularity and problem re-election prospects, in the Spring he had declined to run for a second full term. His heir apparent was Vice-president Hubert Humphrey, former Senator from Minnesota and early champion of civil rights. An old-line liberal, he had been abandoned by many of his colleagues on the left because of his steadfast support for Johnson’s war policy.

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1968: The Southern Strategy III

Introduction: A Moment in Time, 1968: A special series on the 40th anniversary of a year of upheaval, in a world seemingly out of control.

Content: In 1968 Richard Nixon ran for President by courting white voters in the south skeptical of African American progress. This so-called “southern strategy” secured for him election as President. It was one of the most brilliant political transformations in American history, but it had its downside.

 

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1968: The Southern Strategy II

Introduction: A Moment in Time, 1968: A special series on the 40th anniversary of a year of upheaval, in a world seemingly out of control.

Content: Following his dismal failure in southern states in the election of 1960, Richard Nixon developed a cunning Southern Strategy for 1968 and for future years. Even in the midst of his horrific national loss in 1964, Barry Goldwater carried many southern states and proved to the Republican party that in the South, conservative white voters, skeptical of African American progress and disturbed by many modern trends in religion and society, were ripe for the GOP harvest. It was one of the most brilliant political transformations in American history.

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1968: Democratic National Convention III

Introduction: A Moment in Time, 1968: A special series on the 40th anniversary of a year of upheaval, in a world seemingly out of control.

                Content: Jerry Rubin was a Yippie, the nickname for members of the Youth International Party of which he was a founder. He and his troops descended on Chicago determined to protest the Vietnam War and racism in America. Denied permits to assemble and camp in city parks, the Yippies joined thousands of other activists on the streets of Chicago. In typically purple prose, Rubin warned of momentous events to come: "On Wednesday night the shit is really going to hit the fan 'cause we bust out of this park and go down to Grant Park and then go out to the amphitheater. There're going to be some right strange theatrical events. And you'd better have your theater thing down pretty pat."

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The First Human Heart Transplantation II

 

Lead: Building on two centuries of research and experimentation, South African Dr. Christaan Barnard performed the first heart transplant.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Though he was the first surgeon to successfully transplant a human heart, Dr. Barnard was using a technique developed by an American team at Stanford University Medical Center, led by surgeon Norman Shumway, who was considered by many to be the father of heart transplantation. In 1958 Shumway had transplanted the first heart in a dog. He and his associates had spent most of the early 1960s developing heart-lung machines and progressively removing the obstacles to organ transplantation. By the middle of the decade only the issue of immunosuppression seemed to be blocking the way. The body of the patient had a natural tendency to reject donor tissue as an alien to be destroyed.

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America’s Revolution: French and Indian War I

 

Lead: In the 1700s the United States broke from England. No colony in history had done that before. This series examines America’s Revolution.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: It is remarkable but true. The vast majority of the millions of residents of the 13 North American colonies of Great Britain in 1770 considered themselves loyal subjects of King George III. Except for a few radicals, most Americans saw themselves as ordinary faithful Englishmen who just happened to live 3000 miles west of the Irish Sea. In just six years, a Congress of the Colonies had declared independence and had fielded an army to defend that declaration with the intent to banish the rule of King George forever. In that period a significant portion of that population was supporting an unprecedented violent revolution that crafted a successful grand strategy that would create the largest republic in human history to that point.

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A House Divided: Overland Campaign III

Lead: One hundred and fifty years ago the Republic was facing its greatest crisis. This continuing series examines the American Civil War. It is "A House Divided."

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Spotsylvania is remembered as some of the most intense, bloody fighting of the American Civil War. It gained that reputation because neither of the armies would turn aside or give in. The fighting was up-close, personal, hand-to-hand, nigh onto atavistic, territorial, frenzied, and cruel.

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