Andrew Jackson and the Bank III

Lead: With his veto of the charter renewal of the Bank of the United States in 1832, Andrew Jackson delayed the establishment of a U.S. central bank until the early 20th century.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: The battle over the bank was emotional, constitutional, but above all, political. Jackson’s political enemies, Henry Clay and Daniel Webster, thought the Bank’s survival was a winning issue in their attempt to defeat Jackson in the election of 1932, but he outfoxed them. The bank was popular with many businessmen, North and South, but among a majority of Jackson’s supporters it represented an assault on the old Jeffersonian idea of states’ rights. Also, the bank issued bank notes or paper money which was considered fake when compared to gold and silver, but most of all the Bank, headed by blue-blood Philadelphian Nicholas Biddle, was thought to concentrate too much power in the hands of rich, aristocratic, big city easterners.

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Nat Turner Slave Rebellion III

Lead: In the summer of 1831, Nat Turner, a religious mystic convinced that God had called him as a prophet, led a group of followers on a bloody rampage through south-side Virginia in the most serious slave rebellion in U.S. history.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Nat Turner was a gifted and powerful, mesmerizing slave preacher. Nearly all his life Nat Turner could read and write. His owners from the early days encouraged him to read those portions of the Bible that tell slaves to live lives of dutiful and submissive obedience. Yet, he also read subversive portions of the scriptures that gave him hope that one day he might achieve freedom. By the mid-1820s, Nat Turner was attracting large groups of slaves to his preaching services on Sundays near Cross Keys in Southampton County or down near the North Carolina border.

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Battle of the Coral Sea I

Lead: In what may have been the first truly modern naval engagement, Japanese and American carrier aircraft fought over the Coral Sea in May, 1942. No surface ship in either navy sighted the enemy.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: In wake of the attack on Pearl Harbor in 1941, Japanese forces sought to take advantage of allied confusion and their own stunning success in the early days of the war in the Pacific. They upgraded their Strategic Plan to include strikes toward the central Pacific island of Midway and south toward New Guinea and Australia. Midway in June 1942 would prove to be perhaps the decisive defeat for the Japanese Navy in World War II, but the Coral Sea engagement a month earlier, even though it has been considered a draw, stopped the southern advance of the Japanese juggernaut and laid the foundation for the subsequent U.S. victory at Guadalcanal the following winter.

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Nat Turner Slave Rebellion II

Lead: Even as a child, people could tell Nat Turner was exceptional. His intelligence and physical presence marked him for leadership in the slave community of south-side Virginia.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Benjamin Turner owned a small plantation outside the town of Cross Keys in the Virginia county of Southampton, nestled on the North Carolina border 70 miles southeast of Richmond. His land was heavily forested and only about 100 acres were under cultivation. It was enough, however, for him to afford to keep slaves, the mark of status in the south and in 1799 he bought a slave woman freshly arrived from Africa. He named her Nancy and in the next year she gave birth to Nathaniel.

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Construction of the Panama Canal I

Lead: Malaria and yellow fever were rampant. Workers were deserting in droves. It was the summer of 1905 and Teddy Roosevelt was scrambling to save the Panama Canal.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: With no one to lead one of the nation's most challenging engineering feats, President Roosevelt turned to an unlikely advisor, railroad magnate and fervent Democrat James J. Hill. Hill suggested John Frank Stevens, a man largely responsible for the success of the Northern Pacific Railway.

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Court Martial of Billy Mitchell II

Lead: In the 1920s, the U.S. military was hampered by severe budget cutbacks and a debate on the future of the airplane. One persistent, prophetic, but on more than one occasion obnoxious voice in the debate was General William “Billy” Mitchell.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

Content: Billy Mitchell’s father and grandfather were congressmen. He thus grew up in the circles of power and expected people to listen when he spoke, but his habit of going public with his ideas and tendency to browbeat his opponents, diminished his influence with the Army. Mitchell’s experience as head of Army air combat forces in Europe during World War I led him to conclude that the warplane was the key to victory in future conflicts and he went on a crusade to prove it. He was particularly adept at using the press to further his ideas. He arranged a series of highly-publicized tests in which his bombers spectacularly sank several surplus battleships thus proving their vulnerability and increasing obsolescence.

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Justice Joseph Story & Federal Power

Lead: One of the important issues left for future resolution by those who crafted the U.S. Constitution in 1787 was the balance of power within the federal scheme. Mr. Justice Joseph Story helped clear up that issue.
Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Joseph Story was perhaps the most brilliant legal mind of his generation. He grew up in Massachusetts, studied at Harvard, read for the law, and worked his way up the ladder of Commonwealth politics while gaining the reputation as a Jeffersonian Republican. Some of his political colleagues, Jefferson included, suspected that Story was really a closeted federalist, whose sentiments, once released on the federal level, would resolve the hanging question of sovereignty against the states. It turned out they were correct.

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Christmas Story

Lead: For 1500 years, most Christian believers have celebrated the nativity or birth of Christ on December 25th assuming that he was born on that day. They are almost certainly wrong.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Before and after the adoption of Christianity by the Emperor Constantine of the Roman Empire around 300 of the Christian Era, the early Church faced threats even as the early church’s numbers and influence were increasing. The flood of new converts brought with them behaviors, traditions and beliefs that the church found hard to digest. From almost the beginning and for several centuries thereafter, the Christian Church struggled to define orthodoxy and rid its richly diverse growing membership of pagan beliefs and habits. One of the earliest leaders, Paul of Tarsus, grumbled in his pastoral letter to Galatia, that Christians were turning back to their bondage to the observation of “days, months, and seasons,” (Galatians 4:8-11).

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