Anna Larina Bukharin

Lead: As a teenager Anna Larina fell deeply in love with Nicholai Ivanovich Bukharin, a hero of the Russian Revolution, a man twenty-six years her elder. She shared his fate at the hands of Joseph Stalin.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: As a girl, Larina met most of the old Bolsheviks. Her father, Yuri was one of the inner circle and often in the 1920s Lenin or Stalin would dine in their apartment in the Metropole Hotel in Moscow. Bukharin lived just upstairs and soon her crush on him became evident to all around them. Once she wrote a love letter and slipped up the stairs to put it under his door. On the way she nearly ran into Stalin who was headed that way. She gave him the note to deliver. The irony of one of the twentieth century's great butchers passing romantic notes for a love-sick teenager is inescapable.

The Battle of New Orleans- II

Lead: On December 24, 1814, the Treaty of Ghent was signed in Belgium. The treaty ended the war of 1812 and jump-started the political career of Andrew Jackson.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: The greatest American victory, though, the Battle of New Orleans, which was fought on January 8, 1815, occurred fifteen days after the treaty of peace was signed. Both the United States and Great Britain were eager for peace after negotiations had gone on for several months with little progress, and the war seemed to draw to a stalemate. The treaty ended the fighting and pretty much restored the pre-war status quo with few policy changes, territorial gains or concessions from either side. John Quincy Adams, a chief negotiator for the United States, later recorded, “I hoped it would be the last treaty of peace between Great Britain and the United States.” 

The Battle of New Orleans- I

Lead: The biggest American victory of the War of 1812 was won after the war was over. The Battle of New Orleans put an exclamation point on the conflict days after a peace treaty brought hostilities to a conclusion.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: In Fall 1814, a large British fleet left Jamaica. Its goal: gain control of access to the Mississippi River. To accomplish this, the Brits needed to assault and take the City of New Orleans located on the decisive bend in the great river not far from its mouth.

American Revolution: Inept British Colonial Policy III

Lead: In the 1700s the United States broke from England. No colony in history had done that before. This series examines America’s Revolution.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

Content: After more than a century of benign neglect by Britain, the colonies and the mother country discovered they viewed the world from two distinct increasingly disconnected perspectives. The colonies were established as a clearly subordinate part of the British economic system which was known as mercantilism. The colonies grew raw materials, goods were transported in both directions in British ships, all of which was designed to benefit the people and economy of England.

Read more →

American Revolution: Inept British Colonial Policy II

Lead: In the 1700s the United States broke from England. No colony in history had done that before. This series examines America’s Revolution.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

Content: The inability of the London government to effectively exercise control over the colonies was one of the reasons that led to the Revolution. After more than a century of benign neglect by Britain, the colonies and mother country discovered they viewed the world from two distinct increasingly disconnected perspectives. This was compounded by the decidedly amateurish approach London took to governing.

Read more →

American Revolution: Inept British Colonial Policy I

Lead: In the 1700s the United States broke from England. No colony in history had done that before. This series examines America’s Revolution.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

Content: The crisis that severely altered the relationship between Britain and its thirteen North American colonies was fundamentally rooted in an increasingly divergent perception of control. By the 1700s, though the colonies were theoretically under the direction of Britain, the reality was that all of them were largely independent in the way they conducted their own social, political, economic and religious life. They were, to paraphrase the words of sociologists Beatrice and Sydney Webb, virtually autonomous. Distance was too great and effective governmental communication too deficient to permit a closely held control of colonial affairs. Britons may have thought they played the dominant role in the cross-Atlantic relationship, but that was a snare and a delusion. Americans may have not reached the point where they defined this circumstance as independence, but within 12 years after the end of the French and Indian War in 1763, a powerful plurality of the colonists would embrace independence as a reality, and Britain’s sclerotic response made things worse.

Read more →

Dorothea Dix II

Lead: A chance encounter in the East Cambridge Jail in 1841 gave Dorothea Dix a cause to pursue, a focus for her intellect and considerable energy, and a passion which would consume her for the rest of her life.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

Content: Dorothea Dix, daughter of an alcoholic itinerant minister, but granddaughter of a prominent and wealthy Boston physician, in her early years was a devout Christian. She believed her affluent, cultured upbringing and her faith placed powerful requirements on her life. She felt compelled into a life of service to those in society less fortunate, less wealthy, less healthy, less indulged than she.

Read more →

Dorothea Dix I

Lead: She came from a life of wealth and social prominence, but Dorothea Dix devoted her life to good causes, especially helping to improve the treatment of the mentally ill.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

Content: Dorothea Dix’s early years were not happy. Her father was the estranged son of a prominent Boston family. An alcoholic who suffered religious delusions, Joseph Dix barely kept his family out of starvation. Dorothy refused to live in such conditions and eventually, at the age of twelve, fled to Boston where she lived with relatives for the next several years.

Read more →