John Maynard Keynes Predicts Disaster-II

Lead: As part of the British delegation to the Versailles Peace Conference after World War One, John Maynard Keynes became increasingly disenchanted with the hostile attitude of the allies toward Germany.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: the conference was driven by three main leaders: Lloyd George of Great Britain, Clemenceau of France, and Wilson of the United States. The conference is needed to deal the divisions in Europe after four years of terrible fighting. It failed miserably.

John Maynard Keynes Predicts Disaster-I

Lead: Known primarily for his groundbreaking work on economics during the Great Depression, John Maynard Keynes first gained international renown after the World War I Versailles Peace Conference.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Keynes was born in the early 1880s to an academic family in Cambridge England. He studied at Eaton and then at King's College, Cambridge. He graduated with first-class honors in mathematics, but ironically tested poorly on economics. After university Keynes became a civil servant, working on currency issues at Britain's India Office.

The Edict of Nantes II

Lead: The creeping revocation of the Edict of Nantes which withdrew religious freedom from French Huguenots was one of history’s most egregious acts of religious intolerance prior to the Holocaust.

 Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

 Content: In 1598, after several attempts at reaching a settlement between French Protestants, known as Huguenots, and Catholics, King Henry IV issued the Edict of Nantes. He had been a Huguenot, but converted to Catholicism in order to become the first of France’s Bourbon dynasty. He wanted to achieve some kind of accommodation among his unruly and religiously passionate subjects and after four years of negotiation, issued the great Edict.

 

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The Edict of Nantes I

Lead: In the long struggle to achieve religious toleration in a Europe torn by sectarian strife, one of the most important milestones on the road was the Edict of Nantes.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: In the centuries prior to the Protestant Reformation, the Roman Catholic Church in France increasingly came under the control of the royal government. With its structure and officialdom filled with the relatives, supporters, political allies and clients of the King and his family, perhaps even more than other nations, the Church in France was an integral part of way the government  maintained its power.

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Booth’s Preview

Lead: Six weeks before he killed President Abraham Lincoln, John Wilkes Booth had a perfect opportunity to strike.

Intro.: "A Moment in Time" with Dan Roberts.

Content: It is indeed a remarkable photograph. The scene: the United States Capital on March 4, 1865. Photographer Alexander Gardner made several exposures of Abraham Lincoln taking the oath in his second Inauguration. One of the plates was damaged, a smudge appeared right over Lincoln, and the tall, gaunt figure of the President is obscured. The crowd is gathered closely around, filling every available space in front of the incomplete Capital Building.

 

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Matthew Brady II

Lead: During the Civil War the images of Matthew Brady and his associates lent vivid reality to the horror of conflict.

 Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Having made his reputation photographing notable figures in the prewar generation, when conflict broke out in 1861, Matthew Brady went to war. Determined to make a complete record of the war, he hired more than a dozen photographers and sent them out as field operatives to mark the passage of the fighting. They used the collodion "wet-plate" process which fixed the image on a thick glass negative. This method required the subject to pose for only a brief period, but still could not capture action or physical movement.

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U.S. Mid-term Elections of 1946

Lead:  Although the Democrats, led by Harry S. Truman, lost both Houses of Congress during the mid-term elections of 1946, Truman skillfully used the Republican majority to his benefit – and won the 1948 presidential election.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: After the death of Franklin Delano Roosevelt four months into his fourth term on April 12, 1945, barely-known Vice-president Harry S. Truman of Missouri became President. He stepped into the shoes of one many assumed was a giant. During Roosevelt’s presidency, Republicans had been unable to gain control of Congress.

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Gilbert Keith (G.K.) Chesterton II

Lead: G.K Chesterton was known as the Prince of Paradox and his opinions defied normal categories. Liberal, conservative, believer, and skeptic: he infuriated and charmed them all.

 Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Gilbert Chesterton was a large man, 6’ 4” in his prime and weighing over 300 pounds. Yet it was the prodigious mind of this giant sprite, treating each subject with humor as well as complexity, that stretched across the disciplines of literature, politics and religion. He did so in a way that claimed the appreciative imagination of multiple generations of admirers, including those who absolutely disagreed with everything he believed, such as George Bernard Shaw, H.G. Wells and J.M. Barrie. He debated them and their advocacy of modernism in print and later on the BBC and they loved him for it. All the while he punched at his favorite targets with perhaps the richest sense of humor of his compatriots.

 

 

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