Lexington, Massachusetts, 1775 II

 

Lead: Having killed Minutemen on the Lexington, Massachusetts green in April, 1775, British regulars moved off to Concord.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: The British soldiers were sent by Governor Gage to capture provincial arms and the leaders of the Massachusetts rebellion, John Hancock and Sam Adams. In the end they got neither, but like a man sticking his hand into a hornets’ nest they stirred up a Revolution.

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Lexington, Massachusetts, 1775 I

 

Lead: A brief skirmish between British Regulars and colonial militia in Lexington, Massachusetts in April 1775 set off a revolution.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Thomas Gage, the Royal Governor of Massachusetts in the spring of 1775, liked Americans, but it seemed as though the sentiment was not mutual, at least among a certain number of his colonial charges. Led by Samuel Adams and John Hancock, some of the provincials were in thinly disguised rebellion. They had tossed together a Provincial Congress and had begun to assemble war materiel in the tiny village of Concord westward, 21 miles up the Boston Neck. Gage, under pressure from London, had his eyes on those arms and the colonial leaders, to seize the weapons and arrest Hancock and Adams.

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A House Divided: The Fall of Atlanta II

 

Lead: One hundred and fifty years ago the Republic was facing its greatest crisis. This continuing series examines the American Civil War. It is "A House Divided."

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Having pushed Confederate armies under Joseph Johnston back from the suburbs of Chattanooga to within 20 miles of his goal, the vital railroad and manufacturing hub of Atlanta, William Sherman was briefly stymied in late June at Kennesaw Mountain with heavy losses. Summer rains had turned the Georgia clay to muck in June, but by early July these roads had begun to dry. Sherman’s maneuver machine was back in business. He crossed the Chattahoochee River on July 9th and was at Peachtree Creek, four miles from the City, the next day. Panic struck the civilian population as Sherman’s relentless campaign seemed on the verge of success.

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A House Divided: The Fall of Atlanta I

Lead: One hundred and fifty years ago the Republic was facing its greatest crisis. This continuing series examines the American Civil War. It is "A House Divided."

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: In Summer 1864 a sense of malaise and depression gripped the North as the fortunes of Federal armies seemed to flag. Not since the heady days of Confederate triumph in the winter and spring of 1862 and 1863 did the cause of the Union seem so hopeless. In many ways this was a product of war weariness after three years of almost constant conflict and a sense that the Union war strategy had bogged down in Georgia and Virginia, but also it grew from the effusion of blood that attended Yankee forces at seemingly every turn. The horrific slaughter at Cold Harbor had led to stalemate in front of Petersburg, and though Phillip Sheridan eventually rolled up Jubal Early in the Shenandoah Valley, that would not come until deep into the Fall.

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A House Divided: (35) – Origin of Taps

Lead:  One hundred and fifty years ago the Republic was facing its greatest crisis. This continuing series examines the American Civil War. It is A House Divided.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Despite appalling losses on both sides, Robert E. Lee’s rebel forces had hammered and ultimately thwarted the timid George C. McClellan’s grand attempt to take Richmond, the Confederate capital, in spring 1862. During the Seven Day’s Battles in June, the Union Army had been forced to retreat southeast to Harrison’s Landing. Many of the units in the Army of the Potomac bivouacked on Berkeley Plantation, the mansion of which was built in 1726. Berkeley is situated on a bluff above the James River and is the traditional home of the Harrison family which sired two Presidents of the United States.

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A House Divided: The Tide Turns IV

 

Lead:  One hundred and fifty years ago the Republic was facing its greatest crisis. This continuing series examines the American Civil War. It is A House Divided.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: The American Civil War, Phase One, 1860-1861, Confederate Consolidation; Phase Two, 1861-Spring 1862, Union Ascendancy, particularly in the West; Phase Three, Spring 1862 through Gettysburg, Confederate Ascendancy; Phase Four, July 1863 through Spring 1864, The Tide Turns; Phase Five, Stalemate in Virginia, Union triumph in the South and West.

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A House Divided: The Tide Turns III

 

Lead:  One hundred and fifty years ago the Republic was facing its greatest crisis. This continuing series examines the American Civil War. It is A House Divided.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Looking at the Civil War in Phases helps sort out the sometimes confusing course of events and demonstrates how the fortunes of Union and Confederacy ebbed and flowed. By May 1864 the Tide had turned and the power of Northern industrial and financial strength began to make possible significant Union progress. There was a new Yankee commander facing Robert E. Lee’s dwindling forces and increasingly narrow options. Ulysses S. Grant, determined to use his superior numbers and material resources, hammered away at Lee in the Overland Campaign. And though Lee was successful in the Wilderness, at Spotsylvania and in the terrible fighting at Cold Harbor, Grant refused to let up, wheeling around Lee’s right flank and soon the Southern miracle worker ran out of miracles and was slammed with his back on the defenses of Richmond and was forced to endure nearly a year of siege before Petersburg

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A House Divided: The Tide Turns II

 

Lead:  One hundred and fifty years ago the Republic was facing its greatest crisis. This continuing series examines the American Civil War. It is A House Divided.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

Content: If one looks at the American Civil War in phases, Phase One would be Confederate Consolidation ending at the First Battle of Bull Run, July 1861. Phase Two would be Union Ascendency August 1861 until May 1862 with Union forces rolling up victory in the West. Phase Three: Confederate Ascendancy – May, 1862-July 3, 1863. Union morale collapsed as rebel forces were victorious from Jackson’s valley campaign to the Seven Days, Second Bull Run, Fredericksburg, and Chancellorsville. Only the strategic Union victory and reversal of the Lee’s first Northern invasion at Antietam and the Emancipation Proclamation strengthened Northern prospects. Lee’s victories tempted him north a second time toward the disaster of the third day at Gettysburg.

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