Matthew Brady II

Lead: During the Civil War the images of Matthew Brady and his associates lent vivid reality to the horror of conflict.

 Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Having made his reputation photographing notable figures in the prewar generation, when conflict broke out in 1861, Matthew Brady went to war. Determined to make a complete record of the war, he hired more than a dozen photographers and sent them out as field operatives to mark the passage of the fighting. They used the collodion "wet-plate" process which fixed the image on a thick glass negative. This method required the subject to pose for only a brief period, but still could not capture action or physical movement.

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Matthew Brady I

 Lead: Matthew Brady made good on his vow to photograph many of the famous people of his generation.

 Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Brady learned the technique of photography from Samuel F. B. Morse, artist and inventor of the telegraph. At first he used a process perfected in 1837 in France by Louis Jacques Mandé Daguerre. Over the next few decades, the daguerreotype was gradually replaced by the collodion wet-plate process which was more efficient.

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U.S. Mid-term Elections of 1946

Lead:  Although the Democrats, led by Harry S. Truman, lost both Houses of Congress during the mid-term elections of 1946, Truman skillfully used the Republican majority to his benefit – and won the 1948 presidential election.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: After the death of Franklin Delano Roosevelt four months into his fourth term on April 12, 1945, barely-known Vice-president Harry S. Truman of Missouri became President. He stepped into the shoes of one many assumed was a giant. During Roosevelt’s presidency, Republicans had been unable to gain control of Congress.

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Gilbert Keith (G.K.) Chesterton II

Lead: G.K Chesterton was known as the Prince of Paradox and his opinions defied normal categories. Liberal, conservative, believer, and skeptic: he infuriated and charmed them all.

 Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Gilbert Chesterton was a large man, 6’ 4” in his prime and weighing over 300 pounds. Yet it was the prodigious mind of this giant sprite, treating each subject with humor as well as complexity, that stretched across the disciplines of literature, politics and religion. He did so in a way that claimed the appreciative imagination of multiple generations of admirers, including those who absolutely disagreed with everything he believed, such as George Bernard Shaw, H.G. Wells and J.M. Barrie. He debated them and their advocacy of modernism in print and later on the BBC and they loved him for it. All the while he punched at his favorite targets with perhaps the richest sense of humor of his compatriots.

 

 

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Gilbert Keith (G.K.) Chesterton I

Lead: In turn of twentieth century Britain no star in the literary firmament shone brighter than that of G.K. Chesterton. Author, critic, journalist, and Christian apologist, his influence stretched across four decades.

 Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Gilbert Keith Chesterton had London middle-class roots, attended St. Paul’s School, University College, London and the Slade School of Art. As a young man, he abandoned formal education to enter the world of publishing and journalism. For years, his increasingly popular commentary on just about any subject in the universe was inhaled by an adoring readership in periodicals such as The Speaker, London Daily News, Illustrated London News, Eye Witness, and after the beginning of World War I, his own paper, G.K.’s Weekly.

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Charles Dickens in America II

Lead: On his first tour of America in 1842, British author Charles Dickens created a firestorm of abuse by criticizing American publishers for pirating his books.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Americans loved Charles Dickens books, but they didn’t like to pay for them. It was Dickens’ custom to serialize his novels in London newspapers before they were issued in book form. American publishers would obtain the papers, copy the text, and release what amounted to be little more than pirated editions, much to the delight of U.S. citizens who got Dickens on the cheap. The culprit was the lack of any international copyright agreement to which the United States subscribed. When he bitterly complained on his first trip to America, the public accused him of feathering his own nest. The press was especially harsh. It stood to lose much if required to pay for reprints.

 

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Leadership: Wilma Mankiller

Lead: Leadership often comes from the most unlikely persons. In 1985 Wilma Mankiller became the first female chief of a major Indian tribe. Her leadership style and methods were quiet but very effective.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Mankiller was one of eleven children born in Tahlequah, Oklahoma in 1945. She was named for a Cherokee ancestor, a high-ranking warrior of ancient lineage. Wilma grew up in rural, impoverished Mankiller Flats on land given to her paternal grandfather in 1907 when Oklahoma achieved statehood. In the mid-1950s drought and the attending failure of their farm forced the family to move to San Francisco as part of the Bureau of Indian Affairs Relocation Program. This program was established to help resettle poor rural Native Americans in an urban setting.

 

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LFM Custer’s Last Stand II

Lead: For 400 years, service men and women have fought to carve out and defend freedom and the civilization we know as America. This series on A Moment in Time is devoted to the memory of those warriors, whose devotion gave, in the words of Lincoln at Gettysburg, the last full measure.

Intro: A Moment In Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: George Armstrong Custer, leading the Seventh United States Cavalry Regiment, was participating in a three-army campaign. They were sent by General Philip Sheridan to discipline several warlike Indian tribes who, by the spring of 1876, had drifted off their reservations into the valley of the Little Bighorn River in southern Montana. Custer's regiment was part of the army led by General Alfred Terry that had left Fort Abraham Lincoln on the Missouri River in June. The object of the three armies was to converge, find the wandering Indians, punish them and drag them chastened back to the reservation.

 

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