GI Bill of Rights

Lead: Originally conceived as a way of keeping unemployed ex-servicemen off the streets, the GI Bill transformed the campuses of American colleges.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Fearful that returning veterans would not be able to find jobs after World War II, Congress passed the Servicemen's Readjustment Act of 1944. The main feature of the bill was a provision for unemployment benefits at the rate of $20 per week for a year. Almost as an afterthought, the bill's sponsors tossed in a section guaranteeing any qualified veteran the chance to attend college for 48 months, at least in part, at government expense.

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Disputed Election of 1876 III

Lead: The fix was in. A deal with Southern democrats in 1876 made Rutherford B. Hayes President of the Unit-ed States.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: In the election of 1876, Sam Tilden, the New York Democrat was ahead in the popular vote and only one vote shy in the Electoral College. When the College met after the election, the votes of three Southern states were in dispute. To win, Hayes, the Republican candidate, needed all those Southern votes.

Disputed Election of 1876 II

Faced with a deadlocked election in 1876, Congress began to negotiate.

Intro.: "A Moment in Time" with Dan Roberts.

Content: In 1876 the Democrat, Samuel J. Tilden, won the popular vote, 250,000, and had 184 votes in the Elec-toral College, one vote shy of election. Tilden's opponent, Governor Rutherford B. Hayes of Ohio, was far behind at 165 votes and needed all votes of three disputed Southern states to win. All three, Louisiana, South Carolina, and Florida, were controlled by Republicans but they were accusing local Democrats of intimidating Blacks and thus preventing them from voting. Actually, both sides were guilty of fraud. In Louisiana, the members of the electoral commission were all Re-publicans but the chairman, J. Madison Wells offered Louisiana's votes to the highest bidder. Tilden's nephew William Pelton, the acting secretary of the Democratic National Committee, offered Wells $200,000 but the money got there too late and Wells was forced to accept a lesser offer from the Republicans.

Disputed Election of 1876 I

Lead: The Presidential Election in 1876 ended in deadlock. Rutherford B. Hayes, the Republican Governor of Ohio, won, but not without some highly questionable deals on both sides.

Intro.: "A Moment in Time" with Dan Roberts.

Content: After fifteen years of war and Reconstruction and two terms of corrupt politics under Republican President Ulysses S. Grant, the electorate was toying with the idea of returning the Democratic Party to the White House. The Democrats already controlled the House of Representatives and nominated the reform-minded Governor of New York, Samuel J. Tilden.

History’s Turning Points: The Black Death II

Lead: Historical study often helps reveal twists in the human journey. Among history’s turning points: Consider the results of the Black Death.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: After the arrival of the bubonic plague in the 1340s, the people of Europe did not know what was consuming them. This ignorance spawned great acts of courage and compassion, particularly among the clergy, but also near barbaric brutality. Many people blamed the Jews, specifically for poisoning the drinking water. Christian civility went out the window and thousands of Jews were murdered. According to one source, 16,000 were killed in 1349 in Strasbourg alone. Many fled to Poland where in the 20th Century their descendants would be consumed in another Holocaust of human origin.

History’s Turning Points: The Black Death I

Lead: Historical study often helps reveal twists in the human journey. We examine history’s turning points: Consider the Black Death.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: In early October 1347, a ship left the city of Caffa in Southern Russia, bound for the Sicilian port of Messina. Along with its cargo it played host to its usual compliment of migratory black rats. They in turn were infested with tiny fleas bearing the deadly bacillus, identified finally in 1800s as pasteurella pestis, the bubonic plague.

American Revolution: Acts of Charles Townshend III

Lead: In the 1700s the United States broke from England. No colony in history had done that before. This series examines America’s Revolution.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

Content: In 1767 the British Parliament passed what became known as the Townshend Acts, named for Charles Townshend, Chancellor of the Exchequer, a member of the government tentatively led by William Pitt. Pitt had a physical collapse and for two years his leadership was incapacitated. His absence left a power vacuum into which Townshend stepped. The son of a minor aristocrat, he had a troubled youth under his overbearing father and emerged a troubled adult, a brilliant orator in Parliamentary debate, but erratic and domineering in his behavior.

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American Revolution: Acts of Charles Townshend II

Lead: In the 1700s the United States broke from England. No colony in history had done that before. This series examines America’s Revolution.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

Content: George Mason, Virginia planter, politician and future delegate to the U.S. Constitutional Convention in 1787, and widely considered to be the father of the Bill of Rights, was an acute observer of the looming struggle between the American colonies and Great Britain. After the repeal of Stamp Tax, Mason reflected that the attitude of many Britons, particularly those in Parliament who passed and then repealed the tax, was not unlike that of an exasperated parent dealing with an errant child. With icy sarcasm seeming to drip from his pen he wrote of the British attitude, “.,…do what your Papa and Mama bid you and Hasten to return them your most grateful Acknowledgements for condescending to let you keep what is your own; and then all your Acquaintance will love you, and praise you, and give you pretty things;…but if you are a naughty Boy, and turn obstinate, and don’t mind what Papa and Mama say to you….and pretend to judge….yourselves capable of distinguishing between Good and Evil; then everybody will hate you and say you’re a graceless and undutiful Child; your Parents and Masters will be obliged to whip you severely….”

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