First Ladies: Tyler Wives II

Lead: In 1844, within six months of the death of his first wife, the President was in pursuit of another.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: After a lengthy marriage to Letitia Christian, John Tyler found himself a widower in the third year of his single term as President. Official mourning for Letitia was barely over when at a White House dinner party Tyler met his second wife, Julia Gardiner. She was born into a prominent Long Island family, was bright, lively, intelligent, and much sought after in Washington society. On the night of their meeting she played cards with the President and he fell hard for her. After two weeks of high pressure courting, John Tyler, father of seven, proposed to a woman thirty years his junior while they were dancing at the Washington's Birthday Ball. At first she refused, but she did not break off their relationship nor refuse his frequent and sentimental love notes filled with references to "raven tresses, brightest roses and stars peeping from behind their veils."

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First Ladies: Tyler Wives I

Lead: The wives of President John Tyler were a study in contrast.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Born in 1790, Letitia Christian Tyler grew up on a rich plantation east of Richmond, Virginia. She married the future U.S. Senator, Governor, Vice-President, and President after a five- year courtship and in their thirty years of marriage remained a modest fixture in the background of her ambitious husband's busy life. When John served in the Senate, Letitia preferred to remain at home raising the children and managing the household. She did it so efficiently that John was free to pursue his political career. 

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Video Gets Memory

Lead: In the early days, television was very exciting. It had one major problem. No memory. Once broadcast, a live television program was gone.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: The networks had devised a way of filming live telecasts. The machine was a kinescope, actually a 35 mm movie camera which filmed live East Coast television for rebroadcast programs three hours later in the West. “Kines” were grainy, had trouble getting the television picture in sync with the movie camera, and were very expensive. By 1954 the networks were using more movie film than Hollywood.

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Democrats & 1964 Convention IV

Lead: The decline of the Democratic Party in the late 20th century can be attributed in part to its decision to champion black civil rights. This offended many racist Southern whites who migrated into the Republican Party.

Intro. : A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: The Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party emerged from voter registration efforts in the summer of 1964. One of its goals was to present a competing delegation to the Convention in Atlantic City in August. When the two groups arrived, the Party was in a quandary. Here was one group claiming the moral the high ground; some of its members, directly touched by the bloody Mississippi violence of that summer. The other group represented the vast majority of white Mississippians most of whom were opposed to black progress. Even party liberals, such as Senator Hubert Humphrey were conflicted.

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Democrats & 1964 Convention III

Lead: The slipping fortunes of the Democratic Party in 1990s can be seen in part to result from its decision to champion black civil rights. This trend was confirmed at Atlantic City in August 1964.

Intro. : A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: When he signed the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Lyndon Johnson, told one of his aides, Joseph Califano, “I think we’ve delivered the South to the Republican Party for your lifetime and mine.” While his accurate prediction was decades off the mark, the process that led to that Democratic Party implosion was confirmed at the quadrennial party gathering in Atlantic City that summer. One of the persons responsible for the party’s moral triumph, but steady political decline, was a soft-spoken, intellectual schoolteacher from New York named Bob Moses.

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Democrats & 1964 Convention II

Lead: At the Democratic Convention of 1964, competing visions over how to eliminate overt racism in America, secured an electoral triumph but laid the foundation for the precipitous decline of the Party over the next three decades.

Intro. : A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.
Content: Hubert Horatio Humphrey was a classic liberal, economically and socially. He led the charge to firmly establish the national Democratic Party on the side of African Americans in their quest for freedom. At the Convention in 1948 Humphrey argued for a much stronger Civil Rights plank in the platform and prevailed. This angered many southerners who felt that any progress by blacks was a threat to white supremacy. Led by then Governor Strom Thurmond of South Carolina, many southerners bolted the convention. Thurmond ran for President, but the election was Harry Truman’s in 1948. The southerner, however, would have his revenge

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Democrats & 1964 Convention I

Lead: At the Democratic Convention of 1964, Lyndon Johnson was overwhelmingly nominated for President, but those brief days in August confirmed a tectonic shift taking place in American politics.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.Content: When the Democrats assembled in the decaying resort of Atlantic City in the late summer, the outcome was never in doubt. President Johnson would be the nominee. The party was still reeling from the assassination shock of the previous year and would go on to crush the Republicans in an electoral tsunami that would sweep away the conservative challenger Barry Goldwater and dozens of GOP congressmen and Senators. Yet, the events of that August week would seal the fate of the Democrats and make possible the Republican revolution that transformed national politics three decades later.

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Halifax, Nova Scotia Great Explosion II

Lead: The chance collision of two merchant ships and a subsequent huge explosion in December 1917 nearly destroyed the city of Halifax, Nova Scotia. Canadians and the world helped bring it back.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: In the early morning hours of December 6, 1917, Imro, a Norweigian ship headed to pick up relief supplies for the suffering in Belgium, sliced into the side of the French freighter, Mont Blanc, in the narrow Halifax harbor channel leading to the open sea. Mont Blanc was load with tons of explosives and extremely flammable benzol. The encounter loosed the benzol and sparks, caused by scraping metal, set it ablaze. The ship drifted into the crowded docks of Halifax and at about 9:06 Mont Blanc blew up. The ship simply disintegrated and sent a fireball and mushroom cloud miles into the air.

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