The Navajo-Hopi Land Dispute I

Lead: The Navajo-Hopi land dispute involves an excruciatingly complex mix of tradition, religion, economic exploitation, scarce energy resources, and environmental devastation.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: In the American Southwest, the states of Colorado, Arizona, New Mexico, and Utah come together at a precise point in the middle of the desert. The region surrounding that point is known as the Four Corners. This is the home of two Native American tribal groupings, the Hopi and the Navajo.

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1968: Mexico City Olympics II

Introduction: A Moment in Time, 1968: A special series on the 40th anniversary of a year of upheaval, in a world seemingly out of control. 

Content:  The dreams and scheming of political and social activists world-wide calculated the rich opportunity of the Mexico City Summer Olympics in 1968. The Olympics had never been far from politics. Even the ancient games were, in fact, relatively peaceful competition in midst of a truce between rival and hostile Greek City-States. In 1936, the Nazis attempted to use the Berlin Games as a propaganda outreach for their regime.

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1968: Mexico City Olympics I

Introduction: A Moment in Time, 1968: A special series on the 40th anniversary of a year of upheaval, in a world seemingly out of control.

Content: As the time for the quadrennial Olympiad drew near, Mexico, the host country, looked warily at the anticipated arrival of thousands of visitors. Upheaval was the name of the game. It was, after all, 1968. Mexico’s President and Army had brutally, finally, firmly crushed the student-led protests that had filled the streets of the Capital since mid-summer and were anxious to demonstrate that the Revolution had produced a miracle of social and economic progress.

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Last Full Measure – Gulf of Tonkin Incident – II

Lead: For 400 years service men and women have fought to carve out and defend freedom and the civilization we know as America. This series on A Moment in Time is devoted to the memory of those warriors, whose devotion gave, in the words of Lincoln at Gettysburg, the last full measure.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: On August 2, 1964 USS Maddox, a destroyer on intelligence watch in the Gulf of Tonkin off the coast of North Vietnam, was attacked by three enemy torpedo patrol boats. Maddox destroyed the boats, but narrowly escaped a triple torpedo spread launched before the boats were sunk. The destroyer was ordered to remain on station as an assertion of freedom of the seas and two days later, now joined by another destroyer, USS Turner Joy, the whole scenario seemed about to repeat itself. Maddox’s radar picked up three enemy boats that seemed to be closing fast in an attack pattern. Commodore John Herrick, commander of the patrol, radioed for air support and soon both ships and planes were pounding away at the approaching bogies. There was no unimpeachable evidence that an attack command had been broadcast on enemy frequencies as there had been two days before, there was no evidence of debris after the engagement and no real evidence that the three contacts actually attacked the Maddox and Turner Joy. Nevertheless, officers and crew of the two ships certainly felt they were under attack and acted accordingly.

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Last Full Measure – Gulf of Tonkin Incident – I

Lead: For 400 years service men and women have fought to carve out and defend freedom and the civilization we know as America. This series on A Moment in Time is devoted to the memory of those warriors, whose devotion gave, in the words of Lincoln at Gettysburg, the last full measure.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Of all the controversies of the Vietnam War, none has generated as much heat as that surrounding the Gulf of Tonkin Incident of August, 1964. It represented the tipping point of U.S. involvement in Southeast Asia. From that seemingly innocuous dust-up flowed a vast increase in American engagement, ultimately American withdrawal, and, most would say, American defeat.

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Yalta Conference II

Lead: At the Yalta conference in February 1945, the soon-to-be victorious Allies struggled to determine the shape of postwar Europe and to create a mechanism to prevent future global conflicts.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: When the Big Three, Churchill, Roosevelt, and Stalin, met, they had to finalize the fate of those countries liberated after being conquered by Germany in the early years of World War II. Poland, the Baltic states, Czechoslovakia, Hungary, Bulgaria, and Romania had all been taken by the Red Army at excruciating sacrifice. Stalin was reluctant to give them up. Therefore, the Western governments, who had made an alliance of necessity with the Soviet Union in the fight against Nazi Germany, were faced with the reality dictated by Russian boots on the soil of Eastern Europe.

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Yalta Conference I

Lead: In February 1945 the leaders of the United States, Great Britain, and the Soviet Union met to set the shape of post-war Europe. It would be the last time the three Allied wartime chieftains Stalin, Churchill, and Roosevelt would meet.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: The meeting took place in Yalta, a resort town east of Sevastopol in Russian Crimea. It was one of three World War II Allied peace conferences. Preceded by the Tehran Conference in 1943, Yalta would be followed by a meeting in the Berlin suburb of Potsdam the following summer. Each of the three were accompanied by a full revenue of advisors. Prime Minister Winston Churchill came with British Foreign Secretary Robert Anthony Eden. Joseph Stalin brought Commissar of Foreign Affairs Vyacheslav (vyi chis ‘laf) Mikhailovich Molotov and President Franklin Delano Roosevelt was accompanied by his special assistant Harry Hopkins and the US Secretary of State, Edward Reilly Stettinius.  

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Samuel Johnson and Tavern Life

Lead:  Samuel Johnson’s love affair with London was nurtured in taverns. He loved the company, fine food, lively conversations and intellectual stimulation found there. He once said, “the tavern chair was the throne of human felicity.”

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: In eighteenth century London, coffee houses and taverns provided a social setting where one could broaden one’s intellectual horizons. Taverns served food and drink, most often being wine. Beer, for those slightly lower on the social pecking order, could be had at alehouses. People gathered for conversation and entertainment over dinner. Clubs and societies (many by invitation only) were organized and met regularly in taverns.

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