Santa Anna II

Lead: On April 21, 1836 the surprise defeat of Santa Anna by Sam Houston at San Jacinto assured the independence of Texas.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: In early 1836 Mexico’s president and military general Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna marched his army into Texas, then part of Mexico, to quell a rebellion of settlers who were fighting for Texas’ independence. At the Alamo Santa Anna issued a “take no prisoners” order and word of the resulting massacre began to spread. 1,400 new volunteers swelled the ranks of Sam Houston’s rag-tag army. Through artful maneuvering, Houston was able to avoid direct confrontation while he built and trained his men in anticipation of the showdown with Santa Anna.

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Santa Anna I

Lead: In February 1836, Mexican troops, led by General Santa Anna, surrounded, attacked, defeated and killed a group of rebellious Texans at the Alamo.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna was born in Jalapa, Mexico, in 1794. He began a long and controversial military career at the age of 16 gaining prestige when he led Mexican resistance to Spain’s 1829 attempt at re-conquering the country. Four years later he was elected President. Gaining a reputation as an erratic leader, he then led a coup against his own government and established himself as dictator. The colorful, flamboyant Santa Anna loved glory, luxury, ceremony, beautiful women and opium. Not necessarily in that order.

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Chivalry in Medieval Tournaments

Lead: One of the means used to bring some order out of chaos in Medieval Europe was tournaments, martial events organized under an elaborate Code of Chivalry.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: In the centuries following the collapse of the Roman Empire, western Europe struggled to create some semblance of order in the absence of centralized authority, reduced travel and communications, and in the face of almost constant invasions from east Asia, the Isalmic south, and Scandinavia. In such extreme circumstances it is small wonder that there evolved a warrior class which increasingly competed with the Roman Catholic church for domination in society. Rough, uneducated, skilled in the arts of war, these fighters gradually came to be known as knights. In the high medieval period, from above A.D. 1000 to 1400, with outside threats receding and seeking outlets for their restless energies, knights would compete in elaborate regional tournaments to sharpen their fighting skills, generate income and settle personal grievances.

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Sarah Alden Bradford Ripley II

Lead: By the 1830s Sarah Alden Bradford Ripley, the wife of Boston Unitarian parson, had become one of the most influential thinkers in America.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Self-taught classical scholar, Sarah Ripley, never traveled out of New England and never published any of her writings. Still, she influenced the works and thoughts of many of her contemporaries – Henry David Thoreau, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Margaret Fuller, William Ellery Channing, and her close friend Ralph Waldo Emerson, her husband’s nephew, and once her pupil.

 

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Sarah Alden Bradford Ripley I

Lead: Born in 1793 in Concord, Massachusetts, Sarah Alden Bradford became one of America’s most influential intellects of 19th century.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Sarah Alden Bradford Ripley was the eldest child of a New England sea captain with family roots tracing back to the Plymouth Colony governor, William Bradford. She grew up in an intellectual family. Her parents collected books from all over Europe, and they arranged for a classical education for all of their children at a time when there were few opportunities for girls to study classics, much less go to college. Sarah had a precocious mind and a keen sense of observation, particularly of the natural world.

 

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Jean-Jacques Rousseau II

Lead: Accepted as a part of the brilliant literary and cultural society of Paris in the mid-1700s, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, however, never felt quite at home.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: His early youth, spent in one of Geneva’s upper class families, was disrupted by his mother’s death and father’s exile. The resulting social come down gave Rousseau a life-long sense of insecurity and hunger for approval from the wealthy and well-connected. After his 1742 arrival in Paris Rousseau gravitated to the leading intellectual figures of the city cultivating a friendship with many such as the Encyclopedist, Denis Diderot. He soon, however, broke with them over the question of progress. In A Discourse on the Origins of Inequality, begun in late 1753, Rousseau describes primitive man in his idyllic state, basically good in the moral sense, free of the cumbersome burdens of modern society - culture, government, education, even family - here truly was uncorrupted man, the noble savage.

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Jean-Jacques Rousseau I

Lead: In 1712 at the southern end of Lake Geneva hard by the French frontier lay the municipal republic of Geneva. In that year was born one of the west’s most influential social critics, Jean-Jacques Rousseau.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Rousseau’s aristocratic mother died in childbirth and he was raised and educated by his father, a restless artisan who preferred upper class diversions, hunting, dancing, dueling, to his watch-making duties. Rousseau’s early education consisted mostly of readings from the ancient Roman author Plutarch. As an adolescent, he was apprenticed first to a notary and then a brutish and cruel engraver. Rousseau washed out with both. His downward social spiral was humiliating to him and to escape he converted, for a short time, to Catholicism. After a wandering youth, he arrived in Paris in 1742 filled with great hopes and ambition.

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The Navajo-Hopi Land Dispute II

Lead: The Hopi-Navajo land dispute derives much of its intensity because it is wrapped up in issues of energy independence, resource exploitation, and environmental annihilation.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: After centuries of peaceful cohabitation, the arrival of white civilization pushed the Hopi and Navajo tribes into close proximity in the Four Corners region of northeast Arizona. What would be a normal intertribal dispute caused by the crowding, has been vastly complicated because their individual and shared lands sit on top of enormous energy resources, particularly coal.

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