Amiens Peace Treaty, 1802

Lead: On March 27, 1802, the Treaty of Amiens, named for a town in northern France, brought hostilities between Britain and France to an end, but as it turned out, the halt would only be only too brief.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: The French Revolution kicked off a series of military conflicts between France and most other European states that lasted over 23 years, from 1792 to 1815. During the first part, the French Revolutionary Wars, 1792-1799, the rest of Europe tried to stamp out what they considered to be the poison of the Revolution.  1799-1815 marked the Napoleonic Wars.

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Battle of Flodden Field II

Lead:  When King James IV of Scotland invaded England in 1513, the campaign became one of the great military disasters in Scottish history. James lost more than his Kingdom.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: In 1512 English King Henry VIII, took up an alliance with Spain and launched a military campaign against France’s Louis XII. Scotland had an ancient alliance with France and Louis called it in. Scotland’s James IV, although married to Henry VIII’s sister, Margaret Tudor, agreed to invade northern England, thereby hopefully drawing English forces away from the main arena of conflict in the south near France.

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Battle of Flodden Field I

Lead:  In 1513, locked in an alliance with France, Scotland invaded England. The decisive battle, that at Flodden Field, was disastrous for the Scots but was one of the few military triumphs of King Henry VIII.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: When good King Hal came to the throne of England in 1509 there was peace between traditional enemies, England and Scotland. After many years of struggle, the northern Kingdom was still fiercely determined to retain its independence, and in 1502, the two had signed the ill-named Treaty of Perpetual Peace, which, for a short time, ended over two centuries of intermittent warfare. As part of the treaty, young Margaret Tudor, daughter of Henry VII and sister of Henry VIII, became Queen to James IV, King of Scotland.

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Samuel Davies and Slave Literacy Part II

Lead:  Although teaching slaves to read was forbidden, the Rev. Samuel Davies, inspired by the Great Awakening, led a campaign to bring slaves the light of knowledge and of the Gospel.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Samuel Davies was born in New Castle, Delaware, in 1723. He was ordained 1747 and the following year moved to Hanover County, in the Virginia heartland. Davies had been caught up in the mid 18th century movement of religious enthusiasm known as the Great Awakening. Originating with the fiery New England sermons of Jonathan Edwards and spread by itinerant evangelists such as Gilbert Tennant and the English cleric, George Whitfield, with passionate and emotional preaching, the movement emphasized internal faith over church doctrine and encouraged the cultivation of a personal relationship with God. Often those inspired by this revival emerged with a sense of responsibility for the spiritual lives of slaves and Native Americans.

Samuel Davies and Slave Literacy Part I

Lead:  Teaching slaves to read became increasingly illegal in the antebellum South. Nevertheless, a small number of slaves achieved literacy through the efforts of courageous whites and even that of some slaves themselves.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: In the colonial and antebellum South there were few efforts to teach Africans to read. In fact, by the early nineteenth century, across the South, whites passed and strengthened anti-literacy laws. Some states frowned upon even the education of free blacks. Much of this sentiment grew out of fear following several high profile slave revolts such as those led by Gabriel Prosser in Virginia in 1800, Denmark Vessey in Charleston in 1822 and Nat Turner in Southeast Virginia in 1831.

Plains of Abraham, Quebec, 1759

Lead: The Plains of Abraham were an abandoned farmer’s field that lay between Quebec City and bluffs that rise 200 feet above the St. Lawrence River. There in September 1759 Britain cemented its colonial control over North America.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: The struggle for European continental dominance between England and France was matched in North America beginning in the 1600s. A century later France controlled New France, a vast claim north and west of the British colonies that hugged the American east coast. Both powers looked with lust on the fertile Ohio Valley. Technically, the French were already there, had established trading posts and fortifications and were doing a brisk business with Native Americans.

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Samuel Johnson’s Birthday

Lead:  Samuel Johnson, England’s great man of letters and author of the first important English dictionary, helped organize and define the language that comes as close as any to the universal language, was born three hundred years ago.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: In London, and Johnson’s hometown of Lichfield as well as in universities and societies throughout the world, celebrations, conferences, lectures and festivities throughout the year have celebrated the life and works of the father of the English dictionary…known to his contemporaries simply as “Dr. Johnson.”

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Samuel Johnson- London the Center of the World

Lead: Of the many passions in a passionate life few exceeded the city of London for Samuel Johnson. He told his biographer, James Boswell, “When a man is tired of London, he is tired of life; for there is in London all that life can afford.”

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: When Samuel Johnson began working in London in the middle of the 18th century, the City was the largest port in the world, one of the first modern industrial hubs. Johnson watched his beloved metropolis boom and boom again, offering the best and worst of life for visitors and residents alike. And Johnson loved it. The City's streets and roads and lanes were packed with pedestrians, wagons, elegant carriages and humble carts. Live animals, ignorant of their fate to come, were herded toward reeking abattoirs. London government was utterly corrupt. The streets were filled with beggars and thieves, and thanks to the Gin Craze, alcohol consumption was on the rise and it spilled out into the streets. Disease and many other social problems were evident to even the casual observer.

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