Toussaint L’Ouverture – I

Lead: Born a slave, Toussaint L’Ouverture led the fight for Haitian independence.

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

                Content: When Christopher Columbus first visited the island he would name La Espanola, it was inhabited by perhaps 1,000,000 natives who lived primarily by agriculture and fishing. By 1697 the western third of the island had been ceded to France by treaty and during the 1700s renamed became one of the Caribbean’s most successful colonies, its prosperity built of sugar, coffee and cotton production on the back of blacks, African slaves.

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Pearl Buck

Lead: In 1938 an American woman was first awarded the Nobel Prize for literature.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: The Nobel Prizes were established in 1901 by the trust of the Swedish inventor and scientist Alfred Nobel. They are awarded annually to persons conferring “the greatest benefit on mankind.” To the prizes for chemistry, medicine, literature, physics and peace, a prize for economics was added in 1969, endowed by the Central Bank of Sweden. Two American women have won the prize for literature, Tony Morrison in 1993 and in 1938 Pearl Buck.

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Spiro Theodore Agnew – I

Lead: In 1968 Richard Nixon chose as running mate a little-known border state governor, Spiro Theodore Agnew of Maryland.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Ted Agnew, a successful Baltimore County Executive before moving to Annapolis, was one of the rising stars of the moderate wing of the Republican Party. Nixon needed to reach out to his old enemy Nelson Rockefeller, Governor of New York and the leading moderate. He also had to appease the Goldwater faction powerful in the South and West. Above all, he needed a faceless personality who would not outshine himself. Agnew fit these criteria and also proved to be a loyal trooper, taking the low road as the administration's attack dog, a role Nixon himself played to powerful effect during the Eisenhower years.

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Western Virginia Secedes from Virginia – II

Lead: In June 1863, West Virginia, having seceded from Confederate Virginia, became the thirty-fifth state in the Federal Union of the United States of America.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: By the onset of the Civil War, major tension had developed between the eastern region of Virginia (east of the Alleghenies) and the west counties on the other side of the mountains. As sectionalism between the north and the south led to war, sectionalism in Virginia reached a crescendo. In the Commonwealth, before the Civil War, political and economic power lay in the east in the tidewater and piedmont regions where wealthy landowners had grown dependent on slave labor to work their plantations. In contrast, western Virginia was a land of frontiersmen and immigrants who cleared their own land and worked small farms.

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Western Virginia Secedes from Virginia- I

Lead: In 1863, during the Civil War, the western counties of Confederate Virginia, after decades of dissatisfaction, seceded from the Commonwealth to form a new state as part of the Federal Union.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Following the election of Abraham Lincoln in 1860, eleven states, including Virginia, seceded from the Union. Most of the Virginia population west of the Appalachians opposed secession. Wealthy plantation owners, dependent on slave labor, dominated the eastern tidewater region and southside Virginia. The western part of the state, the trans-Allegheny region, was populated by frontiersmen and late-arriving immigrants from Scotland, Germany, Ireland and Wales. They raised their own livestock and farmed land they had cleared with their own hands. Comparatively few slaves or slaveholders could be found in the west.

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Birth of Modern Olympics – I

Lead: Born of optimism about the human spirit and steeped in nineteenth century ideals of progress, the modern Olympics were designed to promote international good will, healthy living and peace. It did not always work out that way.

 Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.    

 Content: Ever since Coro ‘ebus, a young El’ean cook, prevailed in the 200 meter dash in 776 B.C., the Olympic games have been a source of inspiration and controversy. For more than a thousand years, each quadrennial, spectators and athletes, fans and opportunists would make the uncomfortable summer journey to the shrine of the god Zeus for the games. They were held on the Olympian plain in the northwest corner of Greece’s Peloponnesian peninsula.

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The Treaty of Brest-Litovsk – Part II

Lead:  When Lenin and the Bolsheviks took power in Russia in October, 1917, the most important task before them was to stop the war.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: World War I went badly for the Russians. Continued defeat and incompetence had brought down the Czarist regime and the provisional government that followed it. In their place were Lenin and the Bolsheviks. He knew if their regime was to survive, they had to have peace, no matter what it cost.

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Treaty of Brest-Litovsk – Part I

Lead:  After nearly four years of fighting Russia desperately needed peace - at any price.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: By March, 1918, years of warfare had finally taken their toll on the Russian people. The war had gone badly, with German forces racking up one victory after another. There were two million Russian casualties in 1915 alone. Czar Nicholas II had proven to be a profoundly incompetent war leader, so anxious to maintain supreme royal power that he ignored the Duma, the elected legislature. In 1916, no longer willing to listen to the Duma's criticism, he adjourned it and went to the front. His wife, Czarina Alexandra, tried to rule in his absence, but she was equally incompetent and brought scandal to the government by her emotional dependence on the mystic priest Rasputin. His murder by three discontented aristocrats did little to improve the morale of the country and in March, 1917 severe food shortages brought an abrupt end to the famed Russian tolerance of misfortune. The nation snapped. Food riots led to revolution. When the soldiers sent to quell the riots joined in, the Duma declared a provisional government and three days later the Czar abdicated.

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