Robert Goddard III

Lead: Robert Goddard, one of the pioneers of rocket research, worked in secret, almost alone.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: One of the important features of successful scientific research in the modern era has been collaboration. To a certain degree, scientists have recognized the importance of sharing the results of their research with their colleagues, if nothing more than to prevent a duplication of effort. Progress is hampered if researchers are constantly re-inventing the wheel in their particular area of research.

John Singleton Mosby

Lead: After Lee’s surrender at Appomattox, the Confederacy’s premier partisan, John Singleton Mosby, had to decide how spend the rest of his life.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.          

Content: John Mosby grew up in rural Virginia, graduated from the University in Charlottesville and established a law practice in Bristol. When the Commonwealth seceded he volunteered for service in the Cavalry, fought at the First Battle of Manassas and rose to the rank of Lieutenant. An excellent scout, throughout the summer and fall of 1862, he conducted reconnaissance patrols for General J.E.B. Stuart in Northern Virginia.

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The Trial of John Peter Zenger

Lead: In the summer of 1735, the jury in the trial of New York publisher John Peter Zenger helped establish primary freedoms secured in the Constitution of the United States. 

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts. 

Content: In 1731 William Cosby was appointed colonial Royal Governor of New York. He quickly established a reputation as arrogant, greedy and corrupt. His popularity plummeted in part due to bitter criticism in the pages of The New York Journal. While much of impetus for this censure came from the financiers of the Journal who were part of an equally unscrupulous anti-Cosby faction in the city, the governor’s fury was directed at John Peter Zenger, the Journal’s publisher.

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Canberra: Capitol of Australia II

Lead: The site chosen for its new capital chosen, Australia turned to an international competition to choose the designer. The winner was an American of the Prairie School of Architecture, Walter Burley Griffin.

 Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Walter Griffin was considered part of the Prairie School of Architecture, the most prominent proponent of which was Frank Lloyd Wright, who employed Griffin for several years after 1901. Functional, of economic design, and unpretentious, Prairie School Houses were designed to fit into their surroundings. In 1912, Griffin was selected to design the new capitol of Australia southwest of Sydney.

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Canberra: Capitol of Australia I

Lead: With the coming of the Australian Federation in 1901, the new constitution required the establishment of a capitol. Not Sydney, not Melbourne, but an entirely new seat of government.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Prior to 1900 the continent of Australia was divided between six separate European colonies: New South Wales, Victoria, Tasmania, Queensland, Western Australia and Southern Australia. In the debates leading to Federation, regional rivalries were so intense, particularly between Sydney and Melbourne, that  the price for agreement was a new capitol, in New South Wales, but at least 100 miles from Sydney.

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Silas Deane and Arthur Lee Dispute – II

Lead:  The events surrounding the recall of Silas Deane in 1778 revealed the first public exposure of political and personal divisions among the leaders of the new American Republic. Congress began airing its dirty linen and hasn’t stopped since.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Connecticut native Silas Deane had been in Paris during the early months of 1776 sent by Congress to open trade, buy munitions for the Army on credit, and work for French recognition of American independence. He was very successful in large part because the government of Louis XVI was looking for a path of revenge against Britain for France’s losses in the Seven Years War, which ended in 1763. Even before the crucial Battle of Saratoga, New York in 1777 demonstrated that the Americans might just pull off this Revolution, a supposedly neutral France secretly sent supplies to help.

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Silas Deane-Arthur Lee Dispute – I

Lead: In the mid-1770s, the dispute, principled and personal, between Silas Deane and Arthur Lee illustrated sectional and political tensions that helped define public policy in the infant American Republic.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: As the thirteen colonies of British North America began to consider breaking away from the mother country, the problems threatening this enterprise were daunting. Britain was the most powerful political and military force on the globe. Those colonials advocating separation were clearly in the minority. Heavy industry was almost non-existent and the colonies’ fountainhead of wealth flowed out of the very nation from which they sought separation. America needed alternative avenues of trade and, above all it needed an ally.

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John Wesley – I

Lead: In 1738 a little known and skeptical Anglican clergyman, freshly returned from a failed mission to America, encountered what he later described as divine assurance of salvation. From that point, John Wesley’s life was changed.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: John Wesley’s father was a pastor, rector of the small congregation at Epworth not far from the town of Doncaster in east central England. He was the ninth of thirteen children.  Educated at the Charterhouse School in London and Christ Church College, Oxford he assisted his father for several years and entered the Anglican priesthood in 1728. The following year he returned to Oxford to teach and there with his brother Charles and two companions formed a religious study group, which came to be known as the Holy Club. Their methodical approach to study and piety also earned them the uncomplimentary name, “methodists.” The group studied the Bible, visited and counseled prisoners in the castle jail, and distributed food and clothing to the poor. For this activity their fellow students hounded them, but under John Wesley’s leadership the group had modest growth.