Narvik – II

Lead:  In the Spring of 1940 the town of Narvik on the northwest coast of Norway was the scene of one of the first naval battles of World War II.

Intro. A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: The combination of geography and strategic importance conspired to prevent Norway from maintaining its neutrality in the early months of World War II. Germany needed the Swedish iron ore that was shipped through Narvik during the winter months. When it became apparent that Britain was going to intervene, Hitler ordered the invasion of Norway.

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Narvik – Part I

Lead:  High on the shoulders of the Scandinavian land mass is the small sub-arctic town of Narvik, Norway. In the early days of World War II, Narvik was a strategic target of the British and the Germans.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Until the spring of 1940, Norway had hoped to preserve its neutrality, but it was soon apparent that geography would bring that dream to grief. The coast of Norway was too important for the Germans to let it fall into allied hands. Much of German iron ore came from mines in northern Sweden. During most of the year the ore was shipped through the Gulf of Bothnia and the Baltic Sea, but in winter the Gulf froze and the ore was sent overland to the port of Narvik on the Atlantic coast of Norway and from there through the Leads, a narrow waterway between the mainland and a series of barrier island just off the coast.

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Admiral Grace Hopper – Teaching Computers to Speak

Lead: When Grace Hopper got into the business in 1944, the number of people who had ever heard the word computer could not fill a small room. She stayed with it until she died.

 Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

 Content:. When the United States was sucked into World War II, Vassar College Professor Grace Murray Hopper could have avoided military service. She had a Yale PhD and was in a vital profession, a college math teacher barred from military service, but Grace Hopper loved the U.S. Navy. Her great-grandfather had been a rear admiral, and she battered the doors down and finished first in her midshipman class. The Navy wanted her mind, specifically, her ability to calculate and help operate the new generation of mechanical calculators that would be required if modern weapons were to reach their destructive potential.

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Toussaint L’Ouverture – II

Lead: Drawn into the battle for Haitian independence in 1791, Toussaint L’Ouverture leveraged his military successes into national leadership.

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

                Content: An instinctive leader, Toussaint combined clever military tactics with a politically moderate disposition. This was in contrast to most of the native leaders who were more interested in exacting revenge on the colonial French than building a new society. By 1793 the French were on the ropes. Success by his guerrilla armies along with attacks by the Spanish who controlled two-thirds of the island and intervention by the British raised the prospect that the French might be thrown off the island.

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Toussaint L’Ouverture – I

Lead: Born a slave, Toussaint L’Ouverture led the fight for Haitian independence.

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

                Content: When Christopher Columbus first visited the island he would name La Espanola, it was inhabited by perhaps 1,000,000 natives who lived primarily by agriculture and fishing. By 1697 the western third of the island had been ceded to France by treaty and during the 1700s renamed became one of the Caribbean’s most successful colonies, its prosperity built of sugar, coffee and cotton production on the back of blacks, African slaves.

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Pearl Buck

Lead: In 1938 an American woman was first awarded the Nobel Prize for literature.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: The Nobel Prizes were established in 1901 by the trust of the Swedish inventor and scientist Alfred Nobel. They are awarded annually to persons conferring “the greatest benefit on mankind.” To the prizes for chemistry, medicine, literature, physics and peace, a prize for economics was added in 1969, endowed by the Central Bank of Sweden. Two American women have won the prize for literature, Tony Morrison in 1993 and in 1938 Pearl Buck.

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Spiro Theodore Agnew – I

Lead: In 1968 Richard Nixon chose as running mate a little-known border state governor, Spiro Theodore Agnew of Maryland.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Ted Agnew, a successful Baltimore County Executive before moving to Annapolis, was one of the rising stars of the moderate wing of the Republican Party. Nixon needed to reach out to his old enemy Nelson Rockefeller, Governor of New York and the leading moderate. He also had to appease the Goldwater faction powerful in the South and West. Above all, he needed a faceless personality who would not outshine himself. Agnew fit these criteria and also proved to be a loyal trooper, taking the low road as the administration's attack dog, a role Nixon himself played to powerful effect during the Eisenhower years.

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Western Virginia Secedes from Virginia – II

Lead: In June 1863, West Virginia, having seceded from Confederate Virginia, became the thirty-fifth state in the Federal Union of the United States of America.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: By the onset of the Civil War, major tension had developed between the eastern region of Virginia (east of the Alleghenies) and the west counties on the other side of the mountains. As sectionalism between the north and the south led to war, sectionalism in Virginia reached a crescendo. In the Commonwealth, before the Civil War, political and economic power lay in the east in the tidewater and piedmont regions where wealthy landowners had grown dependent on slave labor to work their plantations. In contrast, western Virginia was a land of frontiersmen and immigrants who cleared their own land and worked small farms.

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