Lead:  The Roman general Marcellus had met his match. Imagine, a Roman consul beaten back by a mathematician.
            Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

                Content: In 212 BC a Roman army under Marcus Claudius Marcellus moved to take the City-State of Syracuse established on Sicily by Greek settlers from Corinth in the eighth century BC. The City was an ally of Carthage, Rome's hated enemy. The King of Syracuse, Hieron II (High-e-rn) asked a seventy-five year old mathematician named Archimedes to organize the Syracuse's defense. This scholar had such a reputation for intensity that legends grew about how he allowed his work to distract him.  Once it is said he worked on a mathematical problem for so long that he neglected to bathe. His friends had to physically drag him to the public baths before he became a danger to the environment. Another legend had him discovering a way of determining the weight of gold and silver in a precious object. This intuition supposedly occurred while bathing. He ran naked through the streets shouting, "Heureka, I've found it." Whether these legends are true or not, Archimedes was a brilliant pioneer mathematician and mechanical genius.