Battle of the Java Sea

Lead: Melancholy gripped the Allies in December, 1941. Japanese forces were everywhere victorious in Southeast Asia. It was time to take a stand.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Thailand, Malaya, Wake Island, Hong Kong, Manila, each were attacked by the Japanese and each fell just as quickly. On the 3rd of January, Churchill and Roosevelt formed a joint command with the Dutch and Australians, the purpose of which was to slow down the Japanese assault. The aim was to stop the enemy at the so-called Malay Barrier, an imaginary line stretching from Singapore at the base of the Malayan Peninsula down along the archipelago that is today known as Indonesia to the west coast of New Guinea.

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Harriet Beecher Stowe

Lead: She was Harriet Beecher Stowe, the little lady who made the big war.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: In 1850 a series of laws were passed by the Congress of the United States that came to be known as the Compromise of 1850. This secured relative peace between North and South and delayed by a decade the coming Civil War. One the parts of the compromise was a strengthened Fugitive Slave Law. It was passed to block the growing campaign by abolitionists and others opposed to slavery who were trying to help slaves escape captivity.

 

 

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Indira Gandhi II

Lead: Cloudy were the political fortunes of India’s longtime Prime Minister Indira Gandhi in the late 1970s. Unfazed, she engineered a vigorous comeback.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Her political intuition, which in the past had seemed infallible, was failing. Power was slipping from her grasp. In June 1975 the High Court of Allabahad (‘a la ba had) found the Prime Minister guilty of irregular and illegal election practices. Economic decline was forcing many Indians further into poverty. When rising public disorder threatened the government, Gandhi resorted to desperation tactics. She declared an emergency, sent political enemies to prison, rescinded constitutional rights, and censored the press with unusual harshness. Confident that her actions had cowed the opposition Gandhi called a snap election. The people rejected her borderline authoritarianism and handed the Prime Minister’s Congress Party a sound thrashing.

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Indira Gandhi I

Lead: Born of a political family prominent in the movement for independence, Indira Gandhi became a leader in her own right as Prime Minister of India

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: The daughter of Jawahalal Nehru, India’s first Prime Minister after independence, after education in Switzerland and Oxford, she returned home, married a lawyer, Feroze Gandhi, then served her widowed father as hostess. By 1955 she had her own seat in the Indian Parliament and four years later became President of the Congress Party, the nation’s strongest political alliance.

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Dillinger and Hoover II

Lead: Like two combatants, John Dillinger and J. Edgar Hoover circled around each other during Dillinger’s year-long crime spree in the 1930s. They used each other for publicity and public relations.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: In 1917 Edgar Hoover was hired as a file clerk by the Department of Justice. Within two years he had secured a position as Special Assistant Attorney General Mitchell Palmer. It was in this capacity that Hoover oversaw deportations and arrests of many Bolsheviks during the Red Scare of the 1920s. By 1924 he was temporary head of the Bureau of Investigation and was confirmed several months later. Gradually, Edgar Hoover transformed the agency into a professional powerhouse. Agents were recruited on the basis of merit, the world’s largest fingerprint file assisted in the apprehension of criminals, the FBI labs provided law enforcement agencies with world class forensic assistance, and the FBI National Academy trained top cops from around the country.

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Dillinger and Hoover I

Lead: In the 1930s two men came to represent the struggle between forces of law and lawlessness. Dillinger and Hoover used the popular press to portray themselves to the public.

Intro: A Moment In Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: John Herbert Dillinger was perhaps America's most famous bank robber. He was raised on a farm in Mooresville, Indiana. After a turn in the U.S. Navy, from which he deserted, Dillinger was caught after a botched holdup and served nine years in various state prisons. He learned the craft of bank robbery at the hands of the professionals while incarcerated, and shortly after his release began a round of bank heists, five in four months. He gained his first national notoriety. He was daring, physically commanding, and was known for being a sharp dresser.

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Pearl Buck

Lead: In 1938 an American woman was first awarded the Nobel Prize for literature.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: The Nobel Prizes were established in 1901 by the trust of the Swedish inventor and scientist Alfred Nobel. They are awarded annually to persons conferring “the greatest benefit on mankind.” To the prizes for chemistry, medicine, literature, physics and peace, a prize for economics was added in 1969, endowed by the Central Bank of Sweden. Two American women have won the prize for literature, Tony Morrison in 1993 and in 1938 Pearl Buck.

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Flying Blind (Autopilot)

Lead: If the airplane was ever to become more than an object of sport or tool of war, it had to be flown at night and in bad weather.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: The enormous potential for aviation was beginning to be felt in the early 1920s but flying at night and during bad weather was hazardous and unreliable and posed serious limitations on the airplane in carrying cargo and passengers. Planes could compete with the railroads because of their speed but trains were far more reliable and in the case of mishap did not bounce as high. Often aviators would be caught in fog or lose sight of the ground at night, become disoriented, lose control of their aircraft, and crash, more often than not with fatal consequences.

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