Battle of the Java Sea

Lead: Melancholy gripped the Allies in December, 1941. Japanese forces were everywhere victorious in Southeast Asia. It was time to take a stand.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Thailand, Malaya, Wake Island, Hong Kong, Manila, each were attacked by the Japanese and each fell just as quickly. On the 3rd of January, Churchill and Roosevelt formed a joint command with the Dutch and Australians, the purpose of which was to slow down the Japanese assault. The aim was to stop the enemy at the so-called Malay Barrier, an imaginary line stretching from Singapore at the base of the Malayan Peninsula down along the archipelago that is today known as Indonesia to the west coast of New Guinea.

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Harriet Beecher Stowe

Lead: She was Harriet Beecher Stowe, the little lady who made the big war.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: In 1850 a series of laws were passed by the Congress of the United States that came to be known as the Compromise of 1850. This secured relative peace between North and South and delayed by a decade the coming Civil War. One the parts of the compromise was a strengthened Fugitive Slave Law. It was passed to block the growing campaign by abolitionists and others opposed to slavery who were trying to help slaves escape captivity.

 

 

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Dillinger and Hoover II

Lead: Like two combatants, John Dillinger and J. Edgar Hoover circled around each other during Dillinger’s year-long crime spree in the 1930s. They used each other for publicity and public relations.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: In 1917 Edgar Hoover was hired as a file clerk by the Department of Justice. Within two years he had secured a position as Special Assistant Attorney General Mitchell Palmer. It was in this capacity that Hoover oversaw deportations and arrests of many Bolsheviks during the Red Scare of the 1920s. By 1924 he was temporary head of the Bureau of Investigation and was confirmed several months later. Gradually, Edgar Hoover transformed the agency into a professional powerhouse. Agents were recruited on the basis of merit, the world’s largest fingerprint file assisted in the apprehension of criminals, the FBI labs provided law enforcement agencies with world class forensic assistance, and the FBI National Academy trained top cops from around the country.

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Dillinger and Hoover I

Lead: In the 1930s two men came to represent the struggle between forces of law and lawlessness. Dillinger and Hoover used the popular press to portray themselves to the public.

Intro: A Moment In Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: John Herbert Dillinger was perhaps America's most famous bank robber. He was raised on a farm in Mooresville, Indiana. After a turn in the U.S. Navy, from which he deserted, Dillinger was caught after a botched holdup and served nine years in various state prisons. He learned the craft of bank robbery at the hands of the professionals while incarcerated, and shortly after his release began a round of bank heists, five in four months. He gained his first national notoriety. He was daring, physically commanding, and was known for being a sharp dresser.

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Flying Blind (Autopilot)

Lead: If the airplane was ever to become more than an object of sport or tool of war, it had to be flown at night and in bad weather.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: The enormous potential for aviation was beginning to be felt in the early 1920s but flying at night and during bad weather was hazardous and unreliable and posed serious limitations on the airplane in carrying cargo and passengers. Planes could compete with the railroads because of their speed but trains were far more reliable and in the case of mishap did not bounce as high. Often aviators would be caught in fog or lose sight of the ground at night, become disoriented, lose control of their aircraft, and crash, more often than not with fatal consequences.

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William Pitt the Younger

Lead: As it had leaders before and after him, the stubborn question of Ireland consumed William Pitt the Younger.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: During the last half of the 1700s, the name William Pitt dominated British politics. William Pitt the Elder helped save the country from defeat by France in the Seven Years War and his son of the same name brought together international coalitions to oppose the aggression of the French Revolution. But despite this record the thorny question of Ireland brought the younger Pitt's ministry to grief and his service to an end.

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William Pitt the Elder

Lead: Like Winston Churchill, the first William Pitt might never have become leader had Britain not been losing the war badly.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Educated at Eton and Trinity College, Oxford William Pitt organized England's war effort and secured the beginnings of a vast overseas empire.

The Seven Years War with France opened in 1756 with a series of disastrous defeats for the British. The Mediterranean fleet was decimated in a battle off the island of Minorca. In India, a portion of the garrison was stifled in the notorious Black Hole of Calcutta. In North America, Native Americans and their French allies raided western settlements with impunity.

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Augustine II

Lead: In AD 386 an official orator in the imperial city of Milan, Italy, Augustine, his intellectual system in tatters and his personal life in shambles, reached a life-changing conclusion.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: When the ambitious new teacher of rhetoric arrived in the imperial capital, he paid a courtesy call on Ambrose, the local Christian bishop. The younger man was impressed with the Bishop’s demeanor, teaching ability and the honor in which the entire community held him. This encounter set in motion the steps leading to Augustine’s conversion to Christianity. He eventually became a priest and, in 395 Bishop of the City of Hippo a North African diocese in what is present-day Algeria.

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