Dorothea Dix I

Lead: She came from a life of wealth and social prominence, but Dorothea Dix devoted her life to good causes, especially helping to improve the treatment of the mentally ill.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

Content: Dorothea Dix’s early years were not happy. Her father was the estranged son of a prominent Boston family. An alcoholic who suffered religious delusions, Joseph Dix barely kept his family out of starvation. Dorothy refused to live in such conditions and eventually, at the age of twelve, fled to Boston where she lived with relatives for the next several years.

Read more →

Leadership: Oliver Hill – II

Lead: Some civil rights leaders became masters of the sound bite, making their contribution in public protest. Not so Oliver Hill. He chose legal weapons to take apart the institutions of white supremacy.               

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.              

Content: Leadership is not always a visible, public exercise. In the twentieth century civil rights movement a variety of stratagem was applied. Some went for public demonstrations. Oliver Hill, following the lifelong approach of his mentor at Howard University Law, Dean Charles Hamilton Huston, went after the legal apparatus that sustained segregation. From their Richmond law firm Hill and his associates litigated scores of cases during the 1950s and 1960s, never losing one.

Read more →

Leadership: Oliver Hill – I

Lead: In the leadership ranks of the twentieth century civil rights movement, few equal the contribution of Oliver Hill. His quiet, unobtrusive legal and personal tenacity helped break the back of massive resistance.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts. 

Content: Oliver Hill was born in 1907 and grew up in Richmond and Roanoke Virginia and in Washington, D.C. He attended Howard University and Howard Law School where he and other students, including his classmate and friend, future Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall, came under the pervasive influence of Dean Charles Hamilton Huston. Huston imparted to his students his lifelong dream of taking apart, root and branch, the legal apparatus of discrimination against blacks in twentieth century America.

Read more →

Honus Wagner Trading Card

 

Lead: Emerging from the heady days of the alliance between tobacco and baseball, the Honus Wagner Trading Card is an extremely rare piece of memorabilia, fetching in 2007 an anonymous Ebay purchase for a whopping $2.35 million.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Almost from inception the American tobacco industry understood the value of advertising in the rising popularity of the national pastime, baseball. Somehow it all fit together. Tobacco use on and off the field was almost universal with players, managers, and the fans all chewing and puffing away at the pungent weed. One of the earliest forms of baseball advertising was the baseball card, absent the modern statistical or biographical information - just a player’s picture and often in a numbered series which encouraged buyers to repeatedly purchase the company’s products.

Loader Loading...
EAD Logo Taking too long?

Reload Reload document
| Open Open in new tab

Download

Keynes vs Hayek IV

 

Lead: Despite the advocacy of their partisans, the alleged rivalry between John Maynard Keynes and Friedrich August Hayek was more apparent than real. Hayek particularly made his greatest impact in the world of politics.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Keynes’ greatest contribution was in the arena of macroeconomics, particularly the activity of the state in creating orderly capital markets and creation and re-stimulation of demand in time of recession. Even conservative economists and politicians recognized this insight and often insist on stimulation in order to get business activity started back up when it is down. Richard Nixon once significantly opined, “we are all Keynesians now.” Keynes’ theories have largely dominated scholarly and academic economics since the 1930s.

Loader Loading...
EAD Logo Taking too long?

Reload Reload document
| Open Open in new tab

Download

Keynes v. Hayek III

Lead: John Maynard Keynes and Friedrich August Hayek are often arrayed at either end of a vast intellectual divide, but in reality they had virtual agreement on a remarkable range of economic theories.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Despite the near adoration with which Hayek is held in conservative and libertarian circles, he was no lover of laissez-faire economics or advocate of an indolent or passive state, an idea much associated with 19th century classical liberalism. Recognizing that modern economies and societies had irrevocably reached a mixed solution to the marketplace that required state participation and state/private collaboration, he once argued against the idea that the state should be inert. He said, “In no system that could be rationally defended would the state just do nothing.” In fact, he understood that the government would play a role in the economy by providing those services that the free market could not create by itself. Hayek allowed the government to regulate safe working conditions, prevent pollution and fraud, and create a safety net in which citizens receive minimal food, shelter, and clothing.

 

Loader Loading...
EAD Logo Taking too long?

Reload Reload document
| Open Open in new tab

Download

Keynes v. Hayek II

Lead: The work of Friedrich August Hayek represented an acute, powerful intellectual rebellion against the growing power of state involvement in the lives of citizens and commerce, but he was no classical liberal.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Adherents to the Austrian approach to economics and its champion, Ludwig von Mises, rose to intellectually challenge the rise of the state, particularly the two great experiments in state dominance over individual life and the marketplace, Communism and Nazism. Von Mises’s most influential acolyte was Nobel Memorial Laureate Friedrich August Hayek. His premier insight in political economy was that as the involvement of the state grew, the reach of individual freedom was circumscribed and the productive, creative contribution of the marketplace to the general prosperity of society as a whole was compromised.

 

Loader Loading...
EAD Logo Taking too long?

Reload Reload document
| Open Open in new tab

Download

Keynes v. Hayek I

Lead: They represent two distinct approaches to political economy. John Maynard Keynes and Friedrich August von Hayek are perhaps the most influential economists of the modern era.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Lord Bertrand Russell, himself no slouch among the intelligentsia of the 20th century, said John Maynard Keynes’s “intellect was the sharpest and clearest that I have ever known. When I argued with him, I felt that I took my life in my hands, and I seldom emerged without feeling something of a fool.”

 

 

Loader Loading...
EAD Logo Taking too long?

Reload Reload document
| Open Open in new tab

Download