Dorothea Dix I

Lead: She came from a life of wealth and social prominence, but Dorothea Dix devoted her life to good causes, especially helping to improve the treatment of the mentally ill.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

Content: Dorothea Dix’s early years were not happy. Her father was the estranged son of a prominent Boston family. An alcoholic who suffered religious delusions, Joseph Dix barely kept his family out of starvation. Dorothy refused to live in such conditions and eventually, at the age of twelve, fled to Boston where she lived with relatives for the next several years.

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Leadership: Oliver Hill – II

Lead: Some civil rights leaders became masters of the sound bite, making their contribution in public protest. Not so Oliver Hill. He chose legal weapons to take apart the institutions of white supremacy.               

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.              

Content: Leadership is not always a visible, public exercise. In the twentieth century civil rights movement a variety of stratagem was applied. Some went for public demonstrations. Oliver Hill, following the lifelong approach of his mentor at Howard University Law, Dean Charles Hamilton Huston, went after the legal apparatus that sustained segregation. From their Richmond law firm Hill and his associates litigated scores of cases during the 1950s and 1960s, never losing one.

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Leadership: Oliver Hill – I

Lead: In the leadership ranks of the twentieth century civil rights movement, few equal the contribution of Oliver Hill. His quiet, unobtrusive legal and personal tenacity helped break the back of massive resistance.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts. 

Content: Oliver Hill was born in 1907 and grew up in Richmond and Roanoke Virginia and in Washington, D.C. He attended Howard University and Howard Law School where he and other students, including his classmate and friend, future Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall, came under the pervasive influence of Dean Charles Hamilton Huston. Huston imparted to his students his lifelong dream of taking apart, root and branch, the legal apparatus of discrimination against blacks in twentieth century America.

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John Kennedy Loses the Vice-Presidency

Lead: In 1956 a little known Senator from Massachusetts suddenly emerged on the national scene by losing.

Intro.: "A Moment in Time" with Dan Roberts.

Content: In 1956 there was little doubt in party circles about who the Democrats would nominate for President. If he wanted it Adlai Stevenson of Illinois could again run against President Eisenhower. The question was who he would chose as a running mate. Jack Kennedy, Senator from Massachusetts considered the race. Some of his advisors, most especially his father, Ambassador Joseph Kennedy, were skeptical. Assuming that Stevenson would lose, the defeat might be attributed to Jack's Catholicism. Also, despite his wealth, physical attractiveness, and stunning victory over Henry Cabot Lodge for the Senate, Kennedy's career had been rather lack-luster to that point and was considered by many to be a political light-weight.
All that changed when the freshly re-nominated Stevenson threw the convention into chaos by declining to name a running mate. The Kennedy competitive juices began to flow and his forces at the Chicago convention jumped into action. There were five candidates but the real race was between Kennedy and Tennessee's Estes Kefauver. By the second ballot Kennedy was ahead but just barely. With the voting so close states previously committed to the other candidates were waving their standards to switch votes. Whoever switched first would probably put one or other over the top.

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Kennedy Gives LBJ the Nod

Lead: The nomination in hand the Senator from Massachusetts needed a running mate who would help him win.

Intro.: "A Moment in Time" with Dan Roberts.

Content: Wyoming did it, the entire delegation at the 1960 Democratic Convention moved for Kennedy in a single vote and he went over the top. After short talk with his pregnant wife on Cape Cod, a brief appearance in the meeting hall, the nominee motored back through the streets of Los Angeles to his hide-a-way on North Rossmore Boulevard for a well-earned rest. While an aide fixed some eggs Jack Kennedy prepared for bed, the nomination for vice-President very much on his mind. He was a Senator from a northeastern state, perceived as a liberal with little experience. He had seized the nomination often ignoring the wishes of Party elders by a combination of hard work, careful strategy, and the generous distribution of his family's enormous financial resources. He needed balance and he needed it badly.

 

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The Last Full Measure – Founding of the Coast Guard

Lead: For 400 years service men and women have fought to carve out and defend freedom and the civilization we know as America. This series on A Moment in Time is devoted to the memory of those warriors, whose sacrifice gave, in the words of Lincoln at Gettysburg, the last full measure.

Content: The United States Coast Guard was founded in 1915, but its roots go far back into American history. Other agencies preceded it or became a part of this consolidation: The Revenue Cutter Service, often called the Revenue-Marine, the Lighthouse Service, the Steamboat Inspection Service, the Bureau of Navigation, and the Lifesaving Service.

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Last Full Measure: P-51 Mustang

Lead: For 400 years service men and women have fought to carve out and defend freedom and the civilization we know as America. This series on A Moment in Time is devoted to the memory of those warriors, whose devotion gave, in the words of Lincoln at Gettysburg, the last full measure.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: In the run-up to the Normandy invasion, the Allies faced a daunting problem. They had to secure air superiority in order to insure the invasion’s success. This meant that they had to destroy the Luftwaffe, the German Air Force. As long as Germany could continue to produce ample quantities of high quality fighter aircraft such as the Messerschmitt 109 and continue to train and bring experienced pilots on line, then the goal of removing German air power would go begging.

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The Man Pursued by War (McLean) II

Lead: In 1861 the first major battle in Virginia took place in the front yard of Wilmer McLean along Bull Run Creek. Seeking to protect his family from the fighting he moved them to south central Virginia.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: It was not uncommon for civilians to remove themselves from areas of intense fighting. Up to this point war was, for the most part, left to soldiers. As the war intensified Federal generals such as Sherman in Georgia and Sheridan in the Shenandoah Valley made destruction of civilian property a matter of military policy. Sherman, in particular, boasted that he had destroyed $100,000,000 in property during his dash from Atlanta to Savannah in the fall of 1864.

 

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