Louis Pasteur I

Lead: French chemist Louis Pasteur had little scientific inclination in his early years. Despite a lackluster academic record his goal was to become a professor of fine arts.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Born in eastern France, the son of a tanner, Pasteur showed an early aptitude for painting. His interest in matters scientific grew as he studied at the Royal College at Besançon and then the Ecole Normale Supérieure in Paris. Successive teaching posts followed in Dijon, Strasbourg, back to the Ecole, Lille and the Sorbonne in Paris.  From the beginning Pasteur’s approach to his work wedded the theoretical to the practical, always with a view to innovation and never permitting conventional wisdom to suppress his creativity. In 1863 as the dean of the new science faculty at Lille University he instituted night classes so industrial and service workers might engage in continued education.

Loader Loading...
EAD Logo Taking too long?

Reload Reload document
| Open Open in new tab

Download [84.45 KB]

Woodrow Wilson and Women’s Suffrage

Lead: When first reaching the White House, Woodrow Wilson’s support for women’s voting rights was rather tepid. Gradually, however, he evolved into a vigorous cheerleader for the suffrage movement.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Despite his New Jersey professional base, President of Princeton, governor the state, Woodrow Wilson never stopped being a child of the south, the Reconstruction south. His father was a Presbyterian clergyman, rather liberal for the time, but Wilson also absorbed the conservative impulses of his Virginia homeland. Even for his era, he was not a chauvinist, he enjoyed the company of intellectually stimulating women and married two of them, but felt that social change was a gradual process and that decisions on voting matters were constitutionally reserved left to the states. He came to the White House with many matters on his plate. Women’s rights were not at the top of the list.

Loader Loading...
EAD Logo Taking too long?

Reload Reload document
| Open Open in new tab

Download [53.06 KB]

Roger Williams and the Founding of Rhode Island I  

Lead: In 1635, religious dissenter Roger Williams was banished from the Massachusetts Bay Colony. His departure was a milestone in constitutional evolution.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts. 

Content: English Puritan preacher Roger Williams immigrated to Massachusetts in 1631.  A Cambridge graduate, he had sought ordination in the Church of England, but gradually came to advocate separation from the official church. After his arrival in America Williams and his wife settled in, but it was not long before this quick-witted, pugnacious and innovative thinker began to clash with the local colonial church leaders over his “radical views.” Williams believed that churches in the colony should break completely from the Church of England, and he opposed government involvement in church affairs. The colonial government used the power of the state to enforce church rules, regulations, and discipline. Furthermore, Williams argued that the colony should not expropriate land that rightfully belonged to the Native Americans unless the Indians were compensated. Even more dangerous from the point of view of the colonial elders, he insisted that his behavior and personal life should be governed, not by the laws of the Commonwealth or even the church, but by his own conscience.

Loader Loading...
EAD Logo Taking too long?

Reload Reload document
| Open Open in new tab

Download [70.72 KB]

History’s Turning Points: Huckleberry Finn II

Historical study reveals twists in the human journey. Consider the continuing controversy over The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: The publication of Huckleberry Finn was greeted with howls of derision by readers and institutions accustomed to the Romantic style of narrative. The author, Mark Twain, was a devotee of literary Realism, a movement within American and European literature that emerged after the Civil War and extended into the twentieth century. It may be defined as “the faithful representation of reality.” Authors such as William James, Rebecca Harding Davis, and Twain attempted in their writings to describe the lives and language of their characters as they really were. By the middle of the twentieth Huckleberry Finn was being hailed as a milestone in American literary progress.

Loader Loading...
EAD Logo Taking too long?

Reload Reload document
| Open Open in new tab

Download [118.41 KB]

Kenesaw Mountain Landis

Lead: For nearly a quarter century after 1920 Baseball was dominated by an wiry, irascible, stubborn  white-haired dictator, “The Judge,” Kenesaw Mountain Landis.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: When veteran Abraham Landis returned to Logansport, Indiana after the Civil War, he named his younger son, Kenesaw Mountain, after the Georgia landmark and battlefield where Abraham nearly lost his leg as a combat surgeon in the army of General William Tecumseh Sherman. From the beginning the boy took on an imperial air with his siblings and the neighborhood kids. They took to calling him, “the Squire,” but with that name went a grudging measure of respect.

 

Read more →

Leadership Series: Speaking Truth to Power: George Cattlett Marshall

Lead: With the shadow of war hanging over Europe, the Army’s new deputy chief of staff spoke his mind to a startled Commander in Chief.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: It was not the first time George Catlett Marshall had spoken to his superiors with unusually frank if not brutal candor. In fact he had a reputation for it. He was not a pest about it, nor did he use it as an attention getting device, nor did he seek to gain say or embarrass those set above him. He seemed to have the uncanny ability to choose the moment in which an honest assessment secured respect and appreciation rather than irritation.

Loader Loading...
EAD Logo Taking too long?

Reload Reload document
| Open Open in new tab

Download [53.34 KB]

The Trial and Execution of Socrates II

Lead: In 399 BC, Socrates, Greek teacher and philosopher, suspected of complicity in Athens’ defeat in the Peloponnesian War, was condemned to death by a jury of his peers.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: In the modern era, Socrates is regarded as one of the most influential figures in the development of thought and philosophy in the west. In the aftermath of the Peloponnesian War, in 399 BC, Socrates was viewed by some as an enemy of Athenian democracy. Socrates often criticized city officials for their lack of moral and intellectual leadership. In the aftermath of Athens’ defeat, charges were brought against the seventy year old teacher, charges of impiety (religious heresies) and corruption of the morals of the young men of Athens (unpatriotic agitation).

Read more →

The Trial and Execution of Socrates I

Lead: In 399 BC the Greek philosopher and social critic, Socrates, was tried for religious heresies and corrupting the morals of the young. His conviction led to his suicide.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Socrates, left no writings of his own. His life and philosophy are known to us through the writings of Plato, his most famous pupil and follower, and through the Greek historian Xenophon. His ideas became the foundation for an secular ethical philosophy based on knowledge and self-examination. Through knowledge, Socrates maintained, one could learn justice, truth and love, and in their application lead a moral life. Socrates’ method of teaching his philosophy is now known as the “Socratic method”- a dialogue between teacher and student that promotes self-examination. The teacher begins with a question such as “What is courage?” The student responds and thus begins a series of interrogatives, question answer, further question, answer, and so on.

Read more →