Battle for Color TV I

Lead: If Peter Goldmark had had his way, television would have never been broadcast in black and white.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: By the late 1920s most of the technical problems of TV broadcasting were solved. A way had been found to convert light into electricity. The transmission of this electrical signal would be done just like radio, but the major obstacle proved to be the way in which the signal would picked up or scanned. Television is in many ways similar to a motion picture. Characters in a movie don’t move. Motion picture film is simply a series of still photographs put end to end and run so fast across the screen that the mind of the viewer gets the impression of movement. Television operates in basically the same way. Hundreds of frozen images per second are picked up or scanned by the camera, converted to electricity, and then sent on to the TV set which sits the next room or fifty miles away and reconverts the signal.

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Otis v. Hutchinson III

Lead: In the 1700s the United States broke from England. No colony in history had done that before. This series examines America’s Revolution.

 Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

 Content: The passage of the Stamp Act in 1765 found the colony of Massachusetts in political gridlock between two great families. The Hutchinson clan, allied with royal governor Bernard, was led by Lt. Governor and Superior Court Chief Justice Thomas Hutchinson. On the other  side was the Otis family led by James Otis and his son James, Jr. Up to this time the Hutchinson cabal had held sway and the logjam in politics meant that Massachusetts would likely submit to the collection of the Stamp tax. The news that Virginia had passed a series of resolves condemning the tax spurred into action Boston’s newspapers and a third network of activists who began use violence against the tax collectors and their supporters. This third group was an informal, shadowy assembly who first called themselves the Loyal Nine, but eventually chose the infamous name which went down in history, the Sons of Liberty.

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Otis v. Hutchinson II

Lead: In the 1700s the United States broke from England. No colony in history had done that before. This series examines America’s Revolution.

 Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

 Content: Thomas Hutchinson hailed from an old Massachusetts family. His ancestor Anne Hutchinson had been banished in the early years of the colony for unorthodox religious opinions, but her descendant was a solid citizen, a Harvard graduate, and a wealthy, successful merchant. As Lt. Governor and Chief Justice of the Superior Court, during the Stamp Act Crisis of 1765, he came to represent accommodation to the desires of the British parliament to tax the American colonies to pay for British troops stationed in America.

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Otis v. Hutchinson I

Lead: In the 1700s the United States broke from England. No colony in history had done that before. This series examines America’s Revolution.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

Content: One of the most important results of the growing antipathy between Britain and its North American colonies in the 1760s was the significant political re-alignment within the colonies that arose out that conflict. Old alliances within the colonies, such as among the first families of Virginia of Virginia, built on beneficial economic connections with London, came under attack from new forces more than willing to consider an independent course for American society, politics and business. The Stamp Act Crisis of 1765 gave these new factions a chance to identify the old alliances as pawns of Great Britain, responsible for unpopular and what many considered to be unconstitutional taxation without representation, and in some cases allied with London in undermining American liberty.

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Mexico: Miguel Hidalgo

Lead: In 1810, Father Miguel Hidalgo led an uprising against Spanish colonial rule in Mexico. Although he was defeated, he became a symbol of Mexican Independence.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.             

Content: Miguel Hidalgo was born in 1753 in the central highlands of Mexico near Guanajuato. Hidalgo was a “criollo” – born in Mexico but with Spanish ancestry. He studied in Valladolid, now Morelia in central Mexico, at first with the Jesuits, and, after their expulsion, at the College of San Nicolas Obisbo where he earned a degree in theology, philosophy and the liberal arts. He was most certainly influenced by the subversive ideas of the Enlightenment. Ordained a Catholic priest in 1778 he taught as well as doing parish work. Hidalgo was a most complex man, some would say poorly managing his passions. He loved gambling, owned multiple haciendas, and fathered several children, but at the same time combined his spiritual duties with a keen sense of social justice. In 1803 Father Hidalgo moved to Dolores, a town in the Mexican highlands of mostly poor indigenous people. He introduced new farming techniques and helped to develop a brick-making and pottery industry.

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Mexico: La Malinche

Lead:  Reviled as a traitor, La Malinche is alleged to have served as a translator and mistress to Conquistador Hernán Cortés and became the mother of his first son.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Although she lives in folklore and legends, there is actually little known about the life of La Malinche, and the derivation of her name is uncertain. Some historians believe Malinche was a corruption of her given Nahua name – Malintzin.

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Spy Satellites

Lead: It was mid-August 1960. In a White House ceremony, President Dwight D. Eisenhower displayed a United States flag that been recovered from an environmental satellite orbiting the earth. He wasn’t exactly telling the whole truth.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Actually, the flag had been carried into orbit aboard Discoverer XIII and was returned to earth in an ejected capsule which was then recovered from its splash down point northwest of Hawaii by a Navy taskforce. It was the first time an object had been catapulted into earth orbit and brought back without mishap, but this exercise was far more than patriotic chauvinism. The Discoverer program was a ruse, a clever cover-up for a secret reconnaissance operation known as Corona.

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British General Strike IV

Lead: In the spring of 1926 Britain endured the only General Strike in its history.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Labor leaders were frustrated. Led by Walter Citrine of the Trades Union Congress, they wanted to work out a settlement of the looming strike of the mine workers and the possibility of a national sympathy strike, but radical rank and file workers pushed for a confrontation. The conservative government of Prime Minister Stanley Baldwin was clearly on the mine owners’ side and had used a nine-month cooling off period to prepare. Labor was not prepared, but when the mine owners locked out their workers and a million of them went on strike, on May 3, 1926, a million and a half transportation, electric, steel and dock workers followed right behind. It was the only time in British history when the vast majority of organized industrial workers gave support to another group of workers for more than one day.

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