Japanese Naval Alliance I

Lead: In 1902, Great Britain ended a century of splendid isolation and cut a deal with Japan.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: For nearly a century the oceans of the world were dominated by the British Navy. It was technologically superior to any other and was backed by an industrial economy that overshadowed all others until the late 1800s when other nations such as Germany, France, Russia and the United States began to catch up. The power of this naval machine was so overwhelming that Britain was permitted a freedom of action unequaled as it established and maintained the largest empire in the modern era. By 1900 this power was under challenge. The greatest threat to British interests at this time was in the Far East. The Chinese Empire was set to rot. Various European powers were nibbling around the edge of that Eastern giant. It could hardly handle its own internal affairs much less resist pressure from the modern states of the West. The weakness of the Chinese meant that Britain had to protect her trading interests there against the infringement of other powers. Russia was expanding into areas of special British interest along Russia's borders: Manchuria in northern China, northern India, and Persia. Germany, France and the United States were increasing their navies which threatened Britain's link with her colonies.

 

American Revolution: The Sugar Act II

Lead: In the 1700s the United States broke from England. No colony in history had done that before. This series examines America’s Revolution.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

Content: In 1764, after the French and Indian War, to pay for 10,000 troops stationed on the American frontier, Parliament passed The Sugar Act. It was the first experiment in colonial taxation that was to eventually drag Britain and its North American colonies into conflict. The Sugar Act was really an import tax on molasses, the key ingredient in the colonial manufacture of rum. Molasses came from West Indies sugar plantations. America rum makers could get molasses much more cheaply from French, Dutch or Spanish islands than British-owned islands.

American Revolution: The Sugar Act I

Lead: In the 1700s the United States broke from England. No colony in history had done that before. This series examines America’s Revolution.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

Content: At the end of the Seven Years’ War or French and Indian War in 1763, one of the last decisions of the British ministry of Lord Bute which had negotiated the peace, was to establish a standing army in America. Considering that the third rail of English politics in that era had been intense opposition to standing armies, Parliament inflicted one on the colonies with relative ease and no significant opposition. King George III was enthusiastic because many leaders of the British Army sat in Parliament and formed a powerful block of support for royal policies in that body. He also saw it as a make-work policy for thousands of soldiers who would soon be mustered out and unemployed at the end of the war if they didn’t have something to do.

The Algonquin Roundtable – II

Lead: The years that followed World War I were optimistic and happy times, a new era of creativity in culture and letters. Leading the way were the members of the Algonquin Roundtable.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: They changed the face of American humor. “A hard-bitten crew,” said Edna Ferber, author of Giant, of her fellows at the Roundtable which met daily for lunch at the Algonquin Hotel in New York, “but if they liked your work they said so publicly and whole-heartedly.” They were fluent, fresh, acerbic, and tough. And could they make you laugh. Ferber insisted that, “being an old maid is like death by drowning, a really delightful sensation, after you cease to struggle.”

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The Algonquin Roundtable – I

Lead: In the years following World War I, a group of future literary stars began to meet for lunch at the fabled Algonquin Hotel in New York.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: World War I helped transform society, culture, religion, manners and literary standards into what became the modern era. In America, New York was the center of this transforming spirit and for a decade in the 1920s driving this revolution in thought and energy was the Algonquin Roundtable or as one author has described them, “the vicious circle.” This informal lunch gathering got its start when writers John Peter Toohey and Dorothy Parker and columnist Franklin Pierce Adams organized a celebration and lampooning of the wartime service of their friend Alexander Woollcott, critic for the New York Times. He was so enthusiastic about his his service, that the duty of friendship required them to shut him up. The Algonquin, just off Broadway on Forty-fourth Street, was already a prestigious gathering place for actors and the literary set so it was a logical place for the event. When he found their friendly sarcasm hugely amusing, one of their number suggested that they meet daily for lunch and a historic tradition commenced.

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Emancipation of Brazil’s Slaves

Lead: The abolition of slavery in Brazil was due in large part to the influence of two courageous but pragmatic rulers.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Brazil was one of the few Latin American countries to gain peacefully its independence from European rule. During Napoleon's invasion of Portugal in the early 1900s, its rulers fled to their South American colony. When the French were no longer a threat, the Portuguese monarchs left Prince Pedro in charge. In 1822 he declared the independence of the nation and himself Emperor of Brazil. The stability provided by the monarchy was largely unmatched in the region.

Crash of the Hindenburg IV

Lead: On May 6, 1937 the German airship Hindenburg, filled with 97 passengers and crew and tons of highly flammable hydrogen gas, was preparing to land at the U.S. Naval Station at Lakehurst, NJ at the end of an uneventful first transatlantic trip of the season.

Intro.: "A Moment in Time" with Dan Roberts.

Content: Herbert Morrison was an announcer for WLS in Chicago. He was in Lakehurst to describe to a live radio audience the arrival of the Hindenburg on that overcast May afternoon. This is the voice of Herbert Morrison.

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Crash of the Hindenburg III

Lead: Expanded to huge dimensions and filled with highly flammable hydrogen gas, German airships became an important element of Hitler’s propaganda machine.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: After the Nazi seizure of power in 1933 one of the most important champions of the German Airship was Hitler's propaganda minister, Joseph Goebbels. The Fuhrer himself was not impressed and refused to set foot in a dirigible, feeling them a creation contrary to nature. Without Goebbel’s enthusiasm the Zeppelin program would probably have died since the construction of a large airship was as costly as that of a heavy battleship.

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