Whitefield and Franklin I

Lead: In the 1740s George Whitefield and Benjamin Franklin combined business and religion in a most unlikely alliance.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: The Great Awakening was a powerful religious revival in British North America between 1720 and 1750. Part of a general stirring of religious interest among Protestants and Roman Catholics in Continental Europe and under John Wesley, in England at about the same time. In America the movement was a reaction to dry, formalistic religion in the main denominations and at one point or another many Baptists, Presbyterians, Congregationalists along with some Anglicans were swept along in the tide of revival.

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John Singleton Mosby

Lead: After Lee’s surrender at Appomattox, the Confederacy’s premier partisan, John Singleton Mosby, had to decide how spend the rest of his life.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.          

Content: John Mosby grew up in rural Virginia, graduated from the University in Charlottesville and established a law practice in Bristol. When the Commonwealth seceded he volunteered for service in the Cavalry, fought at the First Battle of Manassas and rose to the rank of Lieutenant. An excellent scout, throughout the summer and fall of 1862, he conducted reconnaissance patrols for General J.E.B. Stuart in Northern Virginia.

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The Trial of John Peter Zenger

Lead: In the summer of 1735, the jury in the trial of New York publisher John Peter Zenger helped establish primary freedoms secured in the Constitution of the United States. 

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts. 

Content: In 1731 William Cosby was appointed colonial Royal Governor of New York. He quickly established a reputation as arrogant, greedy and corrupt. His popularity plummeted in part due to bitter criticism in the pages of The New York Journal. While much of impetus for this censure came from the financiers of the Journal who were part of an equally unscrupulous anti-Cosby faction in the city, the governor’s fury was directed at John Peter Zenger, the Journal’s publisher.

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Big Four of the Central Pacific Railroad II

Lead: After failing to sell the stock necessary to build his dream, a transcontinental railroad, visionary engineer Theodore Dehone Judah met four shopkeepers who made his dream come true.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: After great disappointment in failing to raise the capital for the railroad, Judah was approached by four men and in a meeting above a hardware store they listened to his plan. The founders of the Central Pacific Railroad were a study in contrast.

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The Big Four of the Central Pacific Railroad I

Lead: Above the hardware store on a cold January night, Theodore Dehone Judah met the four men who would make his dream come true.

Intro.: "A Moment in Time" with Dan Roberts.

Content: Judah had a vision. To span the Continental United States with a railroad. After brilliant success as an engineer in New York, Judah had been lured to California to build the first railroad on the West Coast. In doing so, he fell under the spell of the Sierra Nevada Mountains which piled up just east of his work cite in the Sacramento Valley. He soon found himself spending more and more of his free time roaming the Sierras on foot and muleback with his wife, doing preliminary surveys of the best railroad routes across the mountains. By November 1860, he had found what he thought was the best way across, established a company, issued stock, but found he could hardly give the shares away.

 

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Canberra: Capitol of Australia II

Lead: The site chosen for its new capital chosen, Australia turned to an international competition to choose the designer. The winner was an American of the Prairie School of Architecture, Walter Burley Griffin.

 Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Walter Griffin was considered part of the Prairie School of Architecture, the most prominent proponent of which was Frank Lloyd Wright, who employed Griffin for several years after 1901. Functional, of economic design, and unpretentious, Prairie School Houses were designed to fit into their surroundings. In 1912, Griffin was selected to design the new capitol of Australia southwest of Sydney.

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Canberra: Capitol of Australia I

Lead: With the coming of the Australian Federation in 1901, the new constitution required the establishment of a capitol. Not Sydney, not Melbourne, but an entirely new seat of government.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Prior to 1900 the continent of Australia was divided between six separate European colonies: New South Wales, Victoria, Tasmania, Queensland, Western Australia and Southern Australia. In the debates leading to Federation, regional rivalries were so intense, particularly between Sydney and Melbourne, that  the price for agreement was a new capitol, in New South Wales, but at least 100 miles from Sydney.

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